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RSRBOB
RSRBOB, Technician
Category: Motorcycle
Satisfied Customers: 1078
Experience:  Former Factory Service Rep, Dlr Line Tech, Service Manager, General Manager, Store Owner
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I changed the starter clutch on my v-star 1100 and now the

Customer Question

hi. i changed the starter clutch on my v-star 1100 and now the "T" mark on the flywheel is not lining up as it was in the window. I dont remember moving the crank during the removal or installation of the starter clutch. Do i have a problem or can i attempt to start the engine? Thanks.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Motorcycle
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Do not start the engine until we check some things first.

The first thing you need to do is pull the flywheel off the crank again and make sure the groove (slot) cut into the taper in the center of the flywheel is actually going over the woodreff key in the crankshaft.

This would be the most common cause for the symptoms it sounds like you are describing.

I am curious how it is that you are determining the T mark is now off.

Thanks

RSRBOB

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I noticed that the T Mark was off when I temporarily reinstalled the alternator cover and look through the hole that the plug came out of.
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

OK.

What I am not clear on is if you confirmed the timing by checking the marking on the cam sprocket. If the cam sprocket index mark is off also, it sounds like the crank has just turned. I would turn the crank carefully by hand until you see the TDC mark and check the cam timing from there. Remember you want to see the intake valve open and close to know that cylinder is coming up to TDCC.

Thanks

RSRBOB

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
The cam mark was off about 1/8 " before i removed the flywheel so that is where i marked the chain and left it there. I haven't had a chance to remove the flywheel as u suggested last night because of how late it was. I'm off tomorrow so i will follow your guidelines then.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
When i set the timing before i removed the alternator cover, i noticed that the cam timing was about a 1/2 chain link off the mark or about 1/8" and the flywheel was at the TDC mark. However, i figured that it should be reinstalled the same way. Also, I think that it is very important to note that all 4 years that i have had the bike, it have had small popping (backfire) whenever i let up of the accelerator. A shop mechanic told me that it was just compression but from reading some reviews, it might have been 'out of time' for quite some time now. Thanks...
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I removed the flywheel and the woodrufff key is still n place. The mark on the tming gear is also aligned with the Woodbridge key. The cam mark is also aligned but the TDC mark on the flywheel is off when looking through the opening of the alternator cover.
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Thank you for the additional information.

I am getting confused on what you are telling me, so allow me to explain what I need you to check for me and report that so I can help you.

We need to set the mark on the flywheel so it appears in the window. Turn the crank to get that to happen. For this entire operation, any time we need to turn the crankshaft, make sure both spark plugs are removed and stay removed. Since we are not sure if the cam(s) are in time, we want to minimize as much resistance to turning as possible. That was it is easy to tell if something is wrong.

While we are turning the crankshaft, we need to watch the Intake valve on the rear cylinder open (go down) then close (come back up). Once you see the intake valve close (stop moving up) now look for the TDC mark on the flywheel in the window. This is all we are focusing on at this time. Once you have that mark visible in the window, look for the mark on the cam gear and see if it lines up with the reference mark on the cylinder head. If the TDC mark on the flywheel is visible in the window and the reference mark on the cam and head line up, the cylinder is in time.

Yamaha makes a big deal about making sure the intermediate gear is timed, but the truth of the matter is it does not matter. In timing cams, the only critical factor is when the valve is being opened relative to where the piston is in its travel. I mention this because you said something about marking the cam chain and trying to get it back where it was. Although a noble intent, if I understand what you did, it may not have been necessary.

Since you had the flywheel off, I am guessing you did not alter the cam timing for the front cylinder, so it should be ok.

Check that out and let me know if you need more help.

Thanks

RSRBOB

PS, under no circumstances should you ever force the crank to turn. IF it offers unexpected resistance, stop and look things over. If you force it you could bend a valve creating an even bigger problem. If you feel the rotation get hard or stop, turn the crank backwards a little bit and see if you see a valve trying to open, and look down the cylinder and see if the piston is trying to come up. If it is, back it off and take the gear of the cam and start from there setting the cam timing from scratch.

it appears in the win

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I work away from my home and when u responded, i had already left. I should return home in a week or so, then i will be able to follow your latest instructions. Thanks.
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Not a problem. I get an e mail plus top of the list notifications that you have responded. I will be here whenever you are ready.

RSRBOB

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
ok...i rotated the flywheel until the rear cyclinder was in the up position and the "T" mark was in the window. However, the cam gear mark does not line up with the cyclinder head mark. It's off by one chain link.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Posted by JustAnswer at customer's request) Hello. I would like to request the following Expert Service(s) from you: Live Phone Call. Let me know if you need more information, or send me the service offer(s) so we can proceed.
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Thank you for checking and the additional information.

You need to watch the intake valve open and close to be sure you are on compression stroke. The T mark comes around twice in a 4 stroke cycle so we need to be sure we are not on exhaust/valve overlap. That is the opposing stroke to Top Dead Center Compression. If you are on compression then the reference mark should line up on the cam sprocket. This is crucial that we are on the correct stroke so we don't set our cams "out of phase"

RSRBOB

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I am on compression stroke and the cylinder head is TDC and the "T" mark is in the window however the cam sprocket is still a link off...
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Thank you.

That means we definitely need to change the cam timing so both the mark on the flywheel and the mark on the cam gear line up at the same time.

That means releasing the tension on the cam chain tensioner, taking the cam sprocket off the cam, rolling it which ever direction it needs to go so the timing marks are aligned and bolting it back together. Once you do that, rotate the crank 720 degrees to double check the cam timing compared to the TDCC mark on the flywheel.

After you set the rear cylinder, double check the front cylinder too. The crank rotates something like 290 degrees for TDC front. There is another mark on the flywheel for that. This step is crucial so you keep the engine in phase.

RSRBOB

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Is there a recommended way to loosen the tension on the cam chain? My manual should have those instructions but I am NOT close to it right now. Thanks.
Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Yes, remove the bolt on the end of the tensioner, then you use a small screwdriver (flat blade) inserted where you removed the bolt and screw it in. However, as soon as you remove the screwdriver it is going to return to proper tension. If you have the T shaped tool you can remove the tensioner, screw it in to retract the plunger, then install the T shaped tool to hold it retracted while you work. The T shaped tool works as a screw driver to engage the plunger, then the sides of the T engage the housing to prevent the plunger from screwing itself back in.

RSRBOB

Expert:  RSRBOB replied 1 year ago.

Hopefully you have this completely resolved by now. If you need more assistance, please let me know!

Thanks

RSRBOB