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Doug C.
Doug C., ASE Certified Technician
Category: Mitsubishi
Satisfied Customers: 6383
Experience:  Mitsubishi employed and Factory trained ASE certified technician
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Mitsubishi Montero Sport LS: 1) Need to replace timing (belt,

Customer Question

1) Need to replace timing (belt, pulleys, tensioner) & water pump which is driven by timing belt on a 2000 Mitsubishi Montero Sport, 3.0 Liter.

2) Need to replace the valve guide seals on a 2000 Mitsubishi Montero Sport, 3.0 Liter.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Mitsubishi
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi,

What can I help you with in regard to these two jobs? Are you looking for price estimates, or an idea of how much work it is to do yourself, or?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Hello Doug,


 


1) Timing Belt: I was looking for a listing of components that needed to be removed and what their torque specifications/tightening sequence are. I believe the 3.0 is an interference engine so I will need instructions on pulley locations when installing the belt


 


2) Valve Guides: I am going to be using an air-compressor to hold valves up. I don't know what to expect when replacing the seals. I am guessing I will have to remove the cam shaft & valve keepers. Not sure if there is anything else to this...or any potential difficulties I may run into.


 


Regards,

David

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi David.

Thanks for the clarification.

This is a lot of information to provide, and will take some time to look up all your torque specifications, etc. Most of these are not critical torque, however a few are (crank bolt, for example).

With regard to the valve guide seals, you do not need to remove the cams on this model however you do have to remove the entire upper intake and valve covers of course.

Would it be okay if I got with you in just a little bit once I am able to recover all of the information you need? Again this is a lot of information and will take some time to retrieve it all for you.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Sure, time will not be a problem. I have not purchased the parts yet. Will be doing that this weekend.



Thanks for your help


 


David

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
No problem David.

Are you able to view PDF files? If you would like I can actually provide you with a copy of this relevant section of the engine repair manual if that would work for you. That way you could print out the pages of relevance to review at your leisure.

Let me know if that would be better, or if you would prefer I make some scans a bit later.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

PDF is perfect. Much clearer than a scan.

Thanks,

David


 

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Great.

Thanks for your patience, there was still a good bit I wanted to cover in addition to the manual material.

I am attaching the PDF of the engine repair section of the Factory Service Manual below:

6G7x Engine Repair Manual

For your timing belt job turn to pages 11A-6-1 through 11A-6-6. It will have all of your alignment marks provided as well as tensioner information, etc. Most torque specifications are on the first page, however any missing (I believe the harmonic balancer is omitted) will be in the "Specifications" section at the beginning of the PDF.
The waterpump section is further down, but for the most part it is simply remove bolts, pull out water pump once you get the belt off.

I will give you some supplemental information here:
When removing the belt, take the bolts out of the hydraulic tensioner only. Leave the mechanical tensioner set. Once the belt is off, you can spin check the mechanical tensioner to listen for noise or looseness. If there is none and you don't need to replacement, then you won't have to adjust it later since it is already properly set. If you were to loosen this bolt in the mechanical tensioner, you really need the special tool to adjust it again. Considering these rarely fail, it can save you a bundle of time doing it this way and not having to readjust it later.

When doing the water pump, aftermarket pumps will only be "half" a pump. They are half the price of factory units because you don't get the whole thing. The water pump is a large chunk of aluminum that goes all the way up to the thermostat neck, etc. Aftermarket units will only give you the front half. Now reliability of some aftermarket pumps aside, there is a bigger immediate issue with this. When you remove six of the large bolts for the front half of the water pump, you are loosening the rear half of the pump from the block. This compromises the gasket back there and you will often end up with a coolant leak after installing a new half-pump. To combat this, apart from recommending a factory pump anyway, I strongly recommend getting the gasket that goes on the back of the pump housing, then removing the entire pump housing to install the water pump, using the new gasket between the housing and the block. This extra 15 minutes is worth it in the case that you did get a leak there as you would avoid having to pull the whole front end down again.
You'll see the gasket I mentioned on page 11A-8-1, numbered "9". This picture will be slightly different from yours as a front wheel drive 6G72 is shown which has a smaller pump housing, but the information is all the same otherwise.
Here is what your pump and gasket will look more like (that gasket is "11" in this picture):
graphic


Your valve seals will require the intake to be removed. This is not specifically covered in this manual (As again the pictures are primarily FWD 6G7's). I am attaching the appropriate RWD intake manifold disassembly and torque info below; the parts are numbered in order of removal:
graphic

Once removed you will be able to get to your valve covers to unbolt and remove them (this takes some tricky maneuvering). You will want to not just have new valve cover gaskets but also new spark plug tube seals as well. If your plug wires are oil soaked on removal, you will want to replace the wire set.

Once in there you will see rocker shafts over the valves. These are held in by 12mm bolts, loosen them evenly to remove them... be prepared for the lash adjusters to drop out. We have special tools that hold them in, but you can just lift one rocker at a time and loop some masking tape around it to temporarily hold them.
Do NOT mix up the shafts. They can go back together backwards and this will block oil flow, so make sure you note the side and orientation of each.
graphic

The manual is not going to have steps for on-car stem seal replacement as this isn't an approved repair method. You and I both know there is no sense in removing the heads for seal replacement though.
Hook up your air line to one cylinder at a time and release the valve retainers one at a time. I use a chrome socket with a small magnet in it to put over the stem then pop it with a rubber mallet. This will quickly compress the spring and release the keepers and hopefully catch them in the magnet then you can remove the spring and perch.
Removing the old seals I like to use an old pair of spark plug wire pliers like we used on the old american V8s. They usually grip them just about right then pull and twist to remove.
To install the new seal, slide it over the stem then use a 10mm 1/4 inch drive six point deep well socket to slide over the stem and top of the seal then tap into place. It will snap on when it seats.
Reinstall the spring and perch, then use an automatic keeper tool to set the keepers back in (Lisle makes these and they are available at a lot of auto parts stores).


If you have any questions please just let me know.
IF you feel the need to use one of the lower two negative ratings, please contact me first via the Reply/Continue Conversation link so that I may address your concerns.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Wow. This is exactly what I was hoping for. All vehicles are pretty much the same technology. It's the little details that are unique...like using a 1/4" drive 6-point socket, or the masking tape detail. Thank You very much. Your information has been very useful.

Regards,

David

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
No problem David.

Again if you need anything else (or catch something in the manual that is FWD biased that I missed), just let me know. I can get any specifics you need.

If we are all set for today, you can give a rating to credit my time and close the session. You can always return to this page for related help though; no need to open a new question for the same topic.
Doug C., ASE Certified Technician
Category: Mitsubishi
Satisfied Customers: 6383
Experience: Mitsubishi employed and Factory trained ASE certified technician
Doug C. and 4 other Mitsubishi Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Doug. Believe it or not, I just started the work yesterday. Started valve stems today. I'm almost positive I know the answer to this, but since it happened to all cylinders and the car does run excellent I will get your feedback:

After removing both intake & exhaust rockers on passenger side head, i pumped each cylinder with air. In each case, I heard air leaking through the valves or piston rings. With both sets of rockers removed the valves are all closed & the cylinder should be perfectly sealed. Could all my piston rings be bad?

Your feedback is much appreciated.

Regards,
David
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi David,

You could have worn compression rings on the pistons, or you could have valve sealing issues.
Your best bet is to listen for where the air is escaping to determine where the primary leak is located. With the air connected, go listen to the tail pipe. If you hear a lot of air exiting the tail pipe you have leaking exhaust valves. Listen at the manifold ports; if you hear a lot of air exiting at the manifold ports, you have leaking intake valves. Finally, and this is a bit more difficult since you have the valve covers off, place the valve covers back on (leave the rocker shafts out etc) then listen through the oil filler hole; if you hear the air exiting through the oil filler, you have leaking piston rings.

Some leaking is normal; if you are concerned with how much you have, it would be best to get a leak down tester to determine how bad the situation is. A leak down tester is the same as your air line you are using now, just with two gauges on it... one reading the supply pressure and the other reading the stable pressure in the cylinder. Typically you don't want to see any less than 85% air pressure (15% pressure loss). It will not hold all the pressure though, it will always leak some, that is why there is a usually 15-20% passable scale on the leak down testers.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Hi Doug. Believe it or not, I just started the work yesterday. Started valve stems today. I'm almost positive I know the answer to this, but since it happened to all cylinders and the car does run excellent I will get your feedback:

After removing both intake & exhaust rockers on passenger side head, i pumped each cylinder with air. In each case, I heard air leaking through the valves or piston rings. With both sets of rockers removed the valves are all closed & the cylinder should be perfectly sealed. Could all my piston rings be bad?

Your feedback is much appreciated.

Regards,
David

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi David. I think our site hiccuped for a second there as I got your last post twice. If you didn't see it I addressed your question on the previous post; if you can not see it let me know and I will re-post it.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Got it. Thanks Doug. I will try all your suggestions.

David
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
You're welcome, good luck!
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
What's your opinion on the valve guides? I've got all the seals but now I'm second guessing if this will fix the oil burning. Also, you said to spon gge mechanical timing adjuster and that tgese rately fail. Are you referring to the idler pulley itself? Should I not replace either pulley if they both spin well?

Thanks,

David
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi David,
Valve guides are rarely an issue unless there has been a belt failure in the past, bending valves, and the guides were not checked for damage before valves were replaced.
Otherwise you might see some wobble at very high mileages, it isn't real common though.
Piston rings will leak at upper mileages and burn oil as well... the valve seal issues outnumber them at least 10 to 1 though.

With regard to the idler and tensioner pulleys, if they spin quietly and stop fairly quickly (they don't spin 10 spins on their own etc), and there isn't signs of oil leakage out the back, they are typically fine. If you are pushing 180k it is cheap insurance to just do them and not worry about it. If you are at 60k I wouldn't even consider it unless you see something unusual... 120k a little more prone to replace, but still would go by inspection primarily.
The hydraulic tensioner is the one you really have to be careful about; it will get weak (the tension) and allow the belt to loosen. Look for signs of oil in the top of the hydraulic tensioner where the piston extends; if it is leaking there, replace it.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Doug,

Couple of last things. There is a black plastic cap on top of each lash adjuster. It retains a metal cap with an oil hole in it. A couple of these plastic retainers are broken. Is this a big deal?

Also, are there different intake/exhaust stem seals?

Had to make my own tensioner pukeey adj. tool. Seems to work great. How important is the 4.4Nm? Auto tensioner is within spec.


Thanks,

David
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Hi David,

If you are referring to the retaining rings on the lash adjusters, yes you should replace them if this is damaged.

Yes the intake and exhaust valve seals are slightly different diameter. If you put them on backwards it will smoke like nobodies business. They should be marked on the package which is which. If you just have a bag of seals.... well that is going to stink. Try one then the other to see if one is particularly loose/tight indicating they are backwards.

The belt tension is not terribly critical as long as your auto tensioner is within spec. The piston needs to be extended 3.5-5mm maximum. If it is over 5mm extended or under 3.5mm extended when you pull the pin, the tensioner will be out of its pressure range and during normal operation the belt tension could force it into a spongy spot in it's travel, causing the belt to jump. You must make sure the piston extension is right; if it isn't, readjust the mechanical tensioner.
Always rotate the mechanical tensioner anti-clockwise into the belt, and when setting it the two adjustment holes in the tensioner should be on the bottom side of the fixing bolt and roughly parallel with the body of the hydraulic tensioner.
Customer: replied 1 year ago.

Hi Doug,


 


This is turning into somewhat of a nightmare. Everything is installed and running. I test drove it till it warmed up and even let it sit for awhile to verify there would be no smoke and that everything would run as expected. It did for me... so I turned it over to my buddy. However, on his way home, he said the oil light was coming on/off, particularly when he accelerated. I am crossing my fingers...hoping it is the pressure sensor and not a more serious problem. Could end up being a clogged screen or filter but I doubt it. Can you tell me where the oil pressure sensor is located so I can check its operation? Also, we have been covering a lot of information. I don't want to use this service unfairly...let me know if I need to post a new question.


 


Thanks for all your help/guidance on this.



David

Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.

Hi David,

Did you do any work near the oil filter (the oil pressure switch is right there)?
Did you have any sludge in the head, and if so did you try to clean it?

You mentioned some timing belt work you had done... you didn't happen to tug hard on the wire harness that goes down on the driver side upper timing cover area did you? This leads down to the AC and oil pressure switch.

No risk the rocker shafts were put on backwards?

 

With the light coming on with rpm rather than going out with rpm, I would be more concerned with a loose/damaged wire and fan turbulence is making it lose connection. Let me know on those questions though. I will be leaving shortly, but will catch up with you in the morning if we miss each other.

It's OK to continue here for now. You can always offer a bonus later :)

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I had to move those wires all over the place. Hopefully that's all it is. Regarding the rocker shafts, I noticed that the shafts had a notch in them on one side. Right bank = notch at front, left bank = notch at rear. I did not clean any sludge out although there was a lot. I was working on a place with quite a few leaves. I hope one didn't make it down into crankcase. The one problem I had was that my buddy didnt want to replace the bad lifter so there is a nice tapping going on. He told me the tap got louder as he was driving. So with the fact that sound got louder I'm a little concerned the oil pressure actually dropped. I will check tomorrow. Told him not to drive it.
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Thanks.

There is an excellent chance the pressure switch connector wiring got damaged/pinched etc.
With regard to the rocker shafts, as long as you paid attention to how they came off that's fine. If you get them backwards they will not be oiled due to oiling hole alignment.

If you knocked some sludge loose we may have an issue then. This is a royal pain to resolve if this happened. Check it out and lets go from there..... disconnect the switch and see if the light still flashes. If it does the wire is grounding somewhere. If it doesn't, it is usually easiest to just replace the switch for diagnosis.... a new switch is $7-10 usually and a mechanical oil pressure gauge is significantly more :)
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Hi Doug. Test drive the car. Took awhile but the oil light finally came in. But it did not stay lit. It flashed on and off quickly & randomly. When I pulled over to wiggle the sensor/wiring my buddy said the light just stayed on. I turned the car off and then back on and the light stayed off for a few miles and the same random flashing occurred. I also noticed that when I turned hard to the right, the light would stop flickering. Possibly a bad sensor or some sludge floating around, blocking pressure readings. I feel that it's safe to drive. As long as they turn car off and on when the flickering occurs, and the light does not come back on immediately, they should be safe.

Thoughts?

Thanks, David.
Expert:  Doug C. replied 1 year ago.
Thanks David.

The wiggling of the sensor and the light randomly staying off is a good sign, however the light going out on hard right turns is a bit off-putting.

I assume this problem was definitely not present before?

It might be worth your while to put a new oil pressure switch in there since they are cheap and only take a few minutes to change. If the problem maintains with the new switch, you have bigger problems that will need addressing.

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