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Eric
Eric, Automotive Repair Shop Manager
Category: Mercury
Satisfied Customers: 23998
Experience:  20+ yrs. experience as repair shop manager and technician.
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Remove the transmission on a 1993 mercury topaz. Manual transmission.

Resolved Question:

How do you remove the transmission on a 1993 mercury topaz. Manual transmission.
Submitted: 3 years ago.
Category: Mercury
Expert:  Eric replied 3 years ago.
Hi,

below are step by step directions with photos to help out:

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.

  2. Wedge a wooden block under the clutch pedal to hold the pedal up slightly beyond its normal position. Grasp the clutch cable, pull it forward and disconnect it from the clutch release shaft assembly. Remove the clutch casing from the rib on the top surface of the transaxle case.

  3. Remove the upper 2 transaxle-to-engine bolts. Remove the air cleaner assembly.

  4. Raise and safely support the vehicle on jackstands.

  5. From underneath the car, support the engine with jackstands or other suitable equipment. This is because you will be removing engine/transaxle mounts, and the engine will need some support.

  6. Drain the transaxle fluid into a container and dispose of properly.

  7. Unplug the reverse switch harness, and any other harness or vacuum line which may be in the way of the removal of the transaxle assembly.

  8. Remove the front stabilizer bar-to-control arm nut and washer, on the driver's side and discard the nut. Remove both front stabilizer bar mounting brackets and discard the bolts.

  9. Remove the lower control arm ball joint-to-steering knuckle nut/bolt and discard the nut/bolt; repeat this procedure on the opposite side.

  10. Using a large prybar, pry the lower control arm from the steering knuckle; repeat this procedure on the opposite side.

Be careful not to damage or cut the ball joint boot and do not contact the lower arm.

  1. Remove the front wheels and tires. Remove the nut from the outer CV-joint/halfshaft assembly on both side of the front of the car. Push the halfshaft assembly toward the engine. It may be necessary to use a puller to free the splines in the outer joint.

  2. Using a large prybar, pry the inboard CV-joint assemblies from the transaxle.

Plug the seal opening to prevent lubricant leakage.

  1. Grasp the steering knuckle and swing it and the halfshaft outward from the transaxle; this will disconnect the inboard CV-joint from the transaxle. Inspect the joint boots and replace if needed. Place halfshafts out of the way.

  2. Remove the starter studs-to-engine mount hardware. Remove the mount from the vehicle. Unfasten the starter wires. Remove the starter stud bolts and starter.

  3. Remove the bolts securing the transaxle to the engine above the starter.

  4. Remove the shift mechanism-to-shift shaft nut/bolt, the control selector indicator switch arm and the shift shaft.

  5. Remove the shift mechanism stabilizer bar-to-transaxle bolt, control selector indicator switch and bracket assembly.

  6. Using a suitable crowfoot or wrench, remove the speedometer cable from the transaxle.

  7. Remove the exhaust to the engine/transaxle nuts and bolts.

  8. Remove both oil pan-to-clutch housing bolts. Unfasten the hardware securing the exhaust bracket to the engine oil pan.

  9. Using a floor jack and a transaxle support, position it under the transaxle and secure the transaxle to it.

  10. Remove the insulator-to-body bracket nuts and bolts. When complete, check to make sure all necessary hardware has been removed and no other pieces are preventing the transaxle from being lower out of the car.

  11. Slowly, lower the floor jack, until the transaxle clears the rear insulator. Support the engine by placing wood or jackstands under the oil pan.

  12. Remove the engine-to-transaxle bolts and lower the transaxle from the vehicle.

One of the engine-to-transaxle bolts attaches the ground strap and wiring loom stand off bracket.

To install:

  1. Raise the transaxle into position and engage the input shaft with the clutch plate. Install the lower engine-to-transaxle bolts and tighten to 28-31 ft. lbs. (38-42 Nm).

Never attempt to start the engine prior to installing the CV-joints. Damage to the bearings, differential or transaxle side gear for dislocation and/or damage may occur.

  1. Tighten the left front insulator bolts to 25-35 ft. lbs. (34-47 Nm) and the rear insulator bolts to 35-50 ft. lbs. (47-68 Nm).

  2. Remove the floor jack and adapter.

  3. Using a suitable wrench, install the speedometer cable; be careful not to cross thread the cable nut.

  4. Install the oil pan-to-transaxle bolts and tighten to 28-38 ft. lbs. (38-51 Nm).

  5. Install the shifter stabilizer bar/control selector indicator switch-to-transaxle bolt and tighten to 23-35 ft. lbs. (31-47 Nm).

  6. Install the shift mechanism-to-shift shaft, the switch actuator bracket clamp and tighten the bolt to 7-10 ft. lbs. (9-13 Nm); be sure to shift the transaxle into 4th gear for a 4-speed or 5th gear for a 5-speed, and align the actuator.

  7. Install the starter stud bolts and tighten to 30-40 ft. lbs. (41-54 Nm) and install the engine roll restrictor and the attaching nuts.

  8. Tighten the attaching nuts to 21-20 ft. lbs. (26-27 Nm).

  9. Install the new circlip onto both inner joints of the halfshafts, insert the inner CV-joints into the transaxle and fully seat them; lightly, pry outward to confirm that the retaining rings are seated.

When installing the halfshafts, be careful not to tear the oil seals.

  1. Install the exhaust bracket and hardware.

  2. Connect the lower ball joint to the steering knuckle, insert a new pinch bolt and tighten the new nut to 37-44 ft. lbs. (50-60 Nm); be careful not to damage the boot.

  3. Refill the transaxle and lower the vehicle.

  4. Install the air cleaner.

  5. Install the both upper transaxle-to-engine bolts and tighten to 28-31 ft. lbs. (38-42 Nm).

  6. Connect the clutch cable to the clutch release shaft assembly and remove the wooden block from under the clutch pedal. Connect the negative battery cable.

Prior to starting the engine, set the hand brake and pump the clutch pedal several times to ensure proper clutch adjustment.

  1. Start vehicle and allow to reach normal operating temperature. Check for leaks. Road test the vehicle.

Support the clutch pedal with a wooden block in order to aid in the removal of the clutch cable

Support the clutch pedal with a wooden block in order to aid in the removal of the clutch cable

For safety, support the engine with jackstands, or (like here) tighten a wire come-along under the engine, to keep it from falling when the mounts are removed

For safety, support the engine with jackstands, or (like here) tighten a wire come-along under the engine, to keep it from falling when the mounts are removed

Drain the fluid from the transaxle

Drain the fluid from the transaxle

Unplug any necessary wire harnesses, vacuum lines and any components which may prevent the unit from being easily removed

Unplug any necessary wire harnesses, vacuum lines and any components which may prevent the unit from being easily removed

Click to Enlarge
Unplug the wiring from the reverse switch-it is not necessary to remove the switch itself unless you intend to replace it or the transaxle

Unplug the wiring from the reverse switch-it is not necessary to remove the switch itself unless you intend to replace it or the transaxle

Click to Enlarge
Use a puller to free the outer CV-joint

Use a puller to free the outer CV-joint

Carefully pry the inner CV-joint out-Be aware that some remaining transaxle fluid may leak

Carefully pry the inner CV-joint out-Be aware that some remaining transaxle fluid may leak

Remove the front engine mount

Remove the front engine mount

Remove the starter studs and nuts

Remove the starter studs and nuts

It may be easier to remove the bolts from the starter instead of from the engine assembly, but DO NOT forget to disconnect the starter wiring

It may be easier to remove the bolts from the starter instead of from the engine assembly, but DO NOT forget to disconnect the starter wiring

Click to Enlarge
Remove the retaining bolt above the starter

Remove the retaining bolt above the starter

Loosen the shifter nut and bolt using a wrench ...

Loosen the shifter nut and bolt using a wrench ...

... then remove the nut and bolt to free the linkage

... then remove the nut and bolt to free the linkage

Separate the shifter from the transaxle

Separate the shifter from the transaxle

Remove the stabilizer bar attached to the transaxle

Remove the stabilizer bar attached to the transaxle

Unfasten the exhaust hardware

Unfasten the exhaust hardware

Remove the oil pan-to-transaxle bolts

Remove the oil pan-to-transaxle bolts

Remove the exhaust bracket from the engine/transaxle assembly

Remove the exhaust bracket from the engine/transaxle assembly

Click to Enlarge
Remove the engine mounts/insulators, including the rear mount

Remove the engine mounts/insulators, including the rear mount

Separate the transaxle from the engine and carefully lower the transaxle

Separate the transaxle from the engine and carefully lower the transaxle

Eric, Automotive Repair Shop Manager
Category: Mercury
Satisfied Customers: 23998
Experience: 20+ yrs. experience as repair shop manager and technician.
Eric and 5 other Mercury Specialists are ready to help you

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