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Linda D.
Linda D., Psychotherapist, LMSW, CASAC
Category: Mental Health
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Experience:  LMSW, CASAC
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What are some medicines?

Customer Question

What are some medicines for schizophrenia?
Submitted: 4 months ago.
Category: Mental Health
Expert:  Linda D. replied 4 months ago.

Hello, my name is ***** ***** I am a licensed psychotherapist in private practice in New York State. Thank you for using Just Answer.

Antipsychotic drugs are the cornerstone in the management of schizophrenia. They have been available since the mid-1950s, and although antipsychotics do not cure the illness, they greatly reduce the symptoms and allow the patient to function better, have better quality of life, and enjoy an improved outlook. The choice and dosage of medication is individualized and is best done by a physician who is well trained and experienced in treating severe mental illness. In schizophrenia, antipsychotic medications are proven effective in treating acute psychosis and reducing the risk of future psychotic episodes. The treatment of schizophrenia thus has two main phases: an acute phase, when higher doses might be necessary in order to treat psychotic symptoms, followed by a maintenance phase, which is usually life-long. During the maintenance phase, dosage is often gradually reduced to the minimum required to prevent further episodes and control inter-episode symptoms. If symptoms reappear or worsen on a lower dosage, an increase in dosage may be necessary to help prevent further relapse. Clozaril is the only drug that has been shown to be effective where other antipsychotics have failed. It is less strongly linked with the side effects mentioned above, but it can produce other side effects, including weight gain, changes in blood sugar and cholesterol, and possible decrease in the number of infection-fighting white blood cells. Blood counts need to be monitored every week during the first six months of treatment and then every two weeks and eventually once a month indefinitely in order to catch this side effect early if it occurs.

Other atypical antipsychotics include: Abilify, aripiprazole lauroxil (Aristada), asenapine, brexpiprazole (Rexulti), cariprazine (Vraylar), lurasidone (Latuda), paliperidone, Seroquesl, Risperdal, Consta, Zyprexa, and Geodon Another atypical antipsychotic, iloperidone (Fanapt), has been FDA-approved for acute (but not long-term) treatment of schizophrenia. The use of all of these medications has allowed successful treatment and release back to their homes and the community for many people suffering from schizophrenia.

Although sometimes more effective and better tolerated than older conventional neuroleptics, atypical antipsychotics also have side effects, and current medical practice is developing better ways of understanding these effects, identifying people at risk, and managing complications. Importantly, all atypical antipsychotics carry the possible risk for causing weight gain and raising blood sugar, cholesterol, and trigyleceride, which must be periodically monitored during treatment. Some antipsychotics -- typical and atypical -- can cause heart rhythm problems that may require monitoring by a doctor.

Most of these medications take at least two to four weeks to take effect. Patience is required if the dose needs to be adjusted, the specific medication changed, and another medication added. In order to be able to determine whether an antipsychotic is effective or not, it should be tried for at least four weeks (or even as long as several months in the case of clozapine).

Even with continued treatment, some patients experience relapses. The most common cause of a relapse is stopping medications.

The large majority of schizophrenia patients experience improvement when treated with antipsychotic drugs. Some patients, however, do not respond to medications, and a few may seem not to need them.

Since it is difficult to predict which patients will fall into what groups, it is essential to have long-term follow-up, so that the treatment can be adjusted and any problems addressed promptly.

I hope this information is helpful to you. Please take a moment to rate my service to you as this is the only way we are compensated for our time. I would truly appreciate it and will continue to answer any other questions you may have related to this topic. Sincerely, ***** ***** LMSW, CASAC

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