How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. Mark Your Own Question
Dr. Mark
Dr. Mark, Psychotherapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 5240
Experience:  Dr. Mark is a PhD in psychology in private practice
50444359
Type Your Mental Health Question Here...
Dr. Mark is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

I have been on pain meds for 30 years can my pain doctor refuse to write my script. I

This answer was rated:

I have been on pain meds for 30 years can my pain doctor refuse to write my script. I had a disagreement with my pain doctor and he will not write my meds. which is fentanyl transdermal 75mcg/hr I need time to find a new doctor

Hi! I'll be glad to be of help with this issue.

I can imagine how distressing this situation must be for you. You have clearly been left in the lurch by your pain doctor. I'm sorry this has happened to you. You've been stranded and this is very unusual: doctors are trained to not abandon their patients because of emotional arguments.

But, you do have to move forward, I understand. I'm not sure, though, if the fact that fentanyl is an opioid based medication had anything to do with it. I don't know if your doctor's practice was based on prescribing opioid medications a lot and if he is trying to cut down on those prescriptions. Let me explain.

Opiate based pain relief is very effective. These medications have been prescribed more and more over the last decades as pain medicine has become a specialty. Problem: they have also become among the most widely abused prescription drugs on the street. The DEA (Drug Enforcement Agency) has taken notice. They're now keeping track of prescriptions: which pharmacies and doctors are prescribing them a lot. Some pharmacies have been closed and some doctors investigated. So all doctors are now very, very cautious.

Again, I don't know if that played a role in his decision to summarily stop prescribing the fentanyl or not. But here is the next step you must take. You need to confer with your primary care physician and describe to him/her the situation. That you have an appointment with a new pain specialist and that until that relationship is in place and the new doctor decides on the pain management treatment plan with you, you need a maintenance prescription for the fentanyl. This would be a short term prescription by your PCP so hopefully he/she will be willing to do this for you.

Okay, I wish you the very best!

My goal is for you to feel like you've gotten Great Service from me and the site. If we need to continue the discussion for that to happen, then please feel free to reply and we'll continue working on this. If the answer has given you the help you need, please remember to give a rating of 5 (Great Service) or 4 (Informative and helpful), or even 3 (Got the job done) button. This will make sure that I am credited for the answer and you are not charged anything more than the deposit you already made by pressing any of these buttons. Bonuses are always appreciated! If I can be of further help with any issue now or in the future, just put "For Dr. Mark" in the front of your new question, and I'll be the one to answer it. All the best, XXXXX XXXXX

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

This doctor has been my doctor for 3 years what I need to know is it legal for him to do this I need a script for 30 days isn't there a law proctecting my rights

I am not aware of such a law in any state. A doctor can refuse to prescribe a prescription to a patient if he/she has a medically justifiable reason for doing so. As you can imagine, it is always possible to provide a justification for NOT prescribing a controlled substance medication.


A doctor can also terminate the doctor/patient relationship at any time. The doctor needs only to offer to give you a referral to a different doctor if you ask for one. In a situation such as this where the doctor/patient relationship did not end pleasantly, I don't know that you would want such a referral from him anyways, though.


The doctor/patient relationship is indeed a relationship. It is based on trust and mutual agreement and can be terminated at any time by either party. So for example, when a patient decides they don't like their doctor any more or they don't like what the doctor recommends, they can always go see a different doctor. It's the same on the other side: the doctor can choose to not see a patient any more. A common example is when a doctor stops taking a certain insurance. There is no obligation to keep seeing patients from that insurance any longer. The same is true if there is a disagreement on treatment or any other reason to terminate the relationship.


So you do need to ask your doctor that you see regularly to help in this case for the interim until you start up with the new pain doctor.


I wish you the very best!

My goal is for you to feel like you've gotten Great Service from me and the site. If we need to continue the discussion for that to happen, then please feel free to reply and we'll continue working on this. If the answer has given you the help you need, please remember to give a rating of 5 (Great Service) or 4 (Informative and helpful), or even 3 (Got the job done) button. This will make sure that I am credited for the answer and you are not charged anything more than the deposit you already made by pressing any of these buttons. Bonuses are always appreciated! If I can be of further help with any issue now or in the future, just put "For Dr. Mark" in the front of your new question, and I'll be the one to answer it. All the best, XXXXX XXXXX

Dr. Mark and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you