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Elliott, LPCC, NCC
Elliott, LPCC, NCC, Psychotherapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 7664
Experience:  35 years of experience as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, National Certified Counselor and a college professor.
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My son is suffering from paranoia at age 47. He is an attorney

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My son is suffering from paranoia at age 47. He is an attorney and his practice is all but gone. He is angry, distrustful and suspicious. He believes that his family is involved in sabatoging his marriage, his business and his reputation. We are meeting with him as a group this week i.e. his mother, sister and brother and his father. His will not respond to our attempt to help if we suggest that he needs a doctor. Please advise.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Seeking expert counseling is a sign of strength. A personal relationship with a caring professional is proven clinically effective.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Dear friend,

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

I believe that I can help.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

I am so sorry that your son, and your entire family, is going through this ordeal.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

It seems as if your son has a psychotic disorder. There is a remote possibility that this disorder is induced by a pre-existing medical condition or by some use of medication, but most likely it is a psychiatric disorder, most likely Delusional Disorder, Persecutory Type, unless he is also having other symptoms such as hallucinations and negative behavior, which would then be Schizophrenia.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Either way, if he does not get diagnosis and treatment is symptoms will continue to manifest and he may continue to deteriorate.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Because he has paranoid delusions he will not even trust you, his mother, and will not voluntarily go for treatment.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

If he makes suicidal or homicidal threats then he can be taken into custody for brief observation.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

In order to get him in to treatment he will have to be judged to be unable to make decisions for himself.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Since the laws vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, your best option is to speak with your local country or district attorney and find out how to proceed.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

He will be better off if he can start therapy right away, but he is not likely to volunteer and will have to be coerced.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

And that means coerced under the law, which may be difficult to do.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

You can have him involuntarily committed if you come up with evidence as to why he needs help. You may need the help of a private attorney as well. That is what I would do for my loved one. It is always difficult for families when one member has a serious paranoid disorder because they will not trust you to help them, and they will think that their delusions are real and those who don't agree are lying to them and are the enemy.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

I urge you to let legal advice and get him into treatment.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

I wish you great success and shall keep him, and all your family, in my prayers.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Warm regards,

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Elliott, MAE, LPCC, NCC, CCMHC

Customer: replied 3 years ago.


In regards XXXXX XXXXX family meeting we are having this week, how do we express our concern about the change in his relationship to us? I feel that he does have some trust in me, as he continues to say he loves me and that he believes me when I explain that I don't have a clue about any of the bizarre things that he thinks are going on. Do we indicate to him that his suspicions are irrational? Do we act as though nothing is happening? How do we give him a sense of being loved and cared for and supported in all the ways we possibly can?

Customer: replied 3 years ago.
Relist: Incomplete answer.
Dear Neva,

You did not indicate whether or not your son will be present at the family meeting. I would not recommend it, for he is bound to feel that you are all ganging up on him.

You are perhaps expecting to have a rational meeting with close family members and that if you could just find the right words then you could simply demonstrate to him that he is feeling imaginary threats, and that this feeling is affecting his relationship with the family.

If only it were so simple. Unfortunately his thinking is not clear, but rather quite
clouded and he may not be able to decipher reality from delusion. That is the nature of his disorder.

I suggest that you gather the legal material you need before the meeting and discuss all possibilities. Perhaps, because of your mother-son relationship, that you can win his trust and have him see a psychiatrist on his own volition.

Be gentle, natural, and cautious and you may convince him to go for an evaluation.

If not you may have to revert to using the power of the law.

Elliott, MAE, LPCC, NCC, CCMHC
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