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Elliott, LPCC, NCC
Elliott, LPCC, NCC, Psychotherapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 7662
Experience:  35 years of experience as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, National Certified Counselor and a college professor.
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Does lexapro interfer with oxycontin, coreg,plavix,allopurinal,

Resolved Question:

Does lexapro interfer with oxycontin, coreg,plavix,allopurinal, celexa or norvasc??
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Mental Health
Expert:  Elliott, LPCC, NCC replied 1 year ago.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Seeking expert counseling is a sign of strength. A personal relationship with a caring professional is proven clinically effective.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Dear friend,

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

You are taking a great deal of medication but none of them cause serious side effects in combination with each other. Since there are so many of them there may be some mild side effects but nothing high risk.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

I have prepared a website listing all these drugs for you and you can see for yourself that the risks are all moderate, which is considered acceptable.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Access this list which as all of your medications and the possible interactions. I question why you are taking Lexapro AND Celexa since they are so similar, but it is not a medical problem.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :


http://www.drugs.com/interactions-check.php?drug_list=127-0,679-335,531-266,1013-565,172-78,1770-2012,705-360

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :


which says:

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Interactions between your selected drugs



oxycodone ↔ amlodipine


Applies to: OxyContin (oxycodone), Norvasc (amlodipine)



AmLODIPine and oxyCODONE may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.


Switch to professional interaction data



oxycodone ↔ carvedilol


Applies to: OxyContin (oxycodone), Coreg (carvedilol)



Carvedilol and oxyCODONE may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart rate. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.


Switch to professional interaction data



oxycodone ↔ citalopram


Applies to: OxyContin (oxycodone), Celexa (citalopram)



Using oxyCODONE together with citalopram can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, blurred vision

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, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience these symptoms during treatment. In addition, combining these medications may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience some impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.


Switch to professional interaction data



oxycodone ↔ escitalopram


Applies to: OxyContin (oxycodone), Lexapro (escitalopram)



Using oxyCODONE together with escitalopram can increase the risk of a rare but serious condition called the serotonin syndrome, which may include symptoms such as confusion, hallucination, seizure, extreme changes in blood pressure, increased heart rate, fever, excessive sweating, blurred vision

Full Size Image
, muscle spasm or stiffness, tremor, stomach cramp, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. You should contact your doctor immediately if you experience these symptoms during treatment. In addition, combining these medications may increase side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, and difficulty concentrating. Some people may also experience some impairment in thinking and judgment. You should avoid or limit the use of alcohol while being treated with these medications. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.


Switch to professional interaction data



amlodipine ↔ carvedilol


Applies to: Norvasc (amlodipine), Coreg (carvedilol)



Carvedilol and amLODIPine may have additive effects in lowering your blood pressure and heart rate. You may experience headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting, and/or changes in pulse or heart beat. These side effects are most likely to be seen at the beginning of treatment, following a dose increase, or when treatment is restarted after an interruption. Let your doctor know if you develop these symptoms and they do not go away after a few days or they become troublesome. You may need a dose adjustment or more frequent monitoring by your doctor to safely use both medications. Avoid driving or operating hazardous machinery until you know how the medications affect you, and use caution when getting up from a sitting or lying position. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.


Switch to professional interaction data



carvedilol ↔ citalopram


Applies to: Coreg (carvedilol), Celexa (citalopram)



Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.


MONITOR: Limited clinical data suggest that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may potentiate the pharmacologic effects of some beta-blockers. There have been case reports of patients stabilized on beta-blocker therapy who developed bradycardia, hypotension, and complete heart block following the addition of a SSRI, subsequently requiring discontinuation of one or both agents and/or institution of a permanent pacemaker. The interaction is also corroborated by data from in vitro and clinical studies

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involving paroxetine and metoprolol conducted by one group of investigators. The proposed mechanism is SSRI inhibition (competitive and/or noncompetitive) of CYP450 2D6, the isoenzyme responsible for the metabolic clearance of beta-blockers such as carvedilol, labetalol, metoprolol, nebivolol, propranolol, and timolol. Paroxetine and norfluoxetine (the active metabolite of fluoxetine), in particular, are potent inhibitors of CYP450 2D6 and may be more likely than other SSRIs to cause the interaction. On the other hand, fluvoxamine is a potent inhibitor of CYP450 1A2 and may significantly interact with propranolol, which is a substrate of both CYP450 2D6 and 1A2.

MANAGEMENT: During concomitant therapy with SSRIs, a lower initial dosage and more cautious titration of the beta-blocker may be appropriate. Cardiac function should be closely monitored and the beta-blocker dosage adjusted accordingly, particularly following initiation, discontinuation or change of dosage of SSRI in patients who are stabilized on their beta-blocker regimen. Due to the long half-life of fluoxetine and its active metabolite, norfluoxetine, the risk of an interaction may exist for an extended period (up to several weeks) after discontinuation of fluoxetine. To avoid the interaction, use of beta-blockers that are primarily eliminated by the kidney such as atenolol, acebutolol, betaxolol, carteolol, and nadolol may be considered.



clopidogrel ↔ citalopram


Applies to: Plavix (clopidogrel), Celexa (citalopram)



Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.


MONITOR: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) may potentiate the risk of bleeding in patients treated with ulcerogenic agents and agents that affect hemostasis such as anticoagulants, platelet inhibitors, thrombin inhibitors, thrombolytic agents, or agents that commonly cause thrombocytopenia. The tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine, is also a strong

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SRI and may interact similarly. Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis, thus SRIs may alter platelet function and induce bleeding. Published case reports have documented the occurrence of bleeding episodes in patients treated with psychotropic agents that interfere with serotonin reuptake. Bleeding events related to SRIs have ranged from ecchymosis, hematoma, epistaxis, and petechiae to life-threatening hemorrhages. Additional epidemiological studies have confirmed the association between use of these agents and the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and concurrent use of NSAIDs or aspirin was found to potentiate the risk. Preliminary data also suggest that there may be a pharmacodynamic interaction between SSRIs and oral anticoagulants that can cause an increased bleeding diathesis. Concomitant administration of paroxetine and warfarin, specifically, has been associated with an increased frequency of bleeding without apparent changes in the disposition of either drug or changes in the prothrombin time. Bleeding has also been reported with fluoxetine and warfarin, while citalopram and sertraline have been reported to prolong the prothrombin time of patients taking warfarin by about 5% to 8%. In the RE-LY study (Randomized Evaluation of Long-term anticoagulant therapy), SRIs were associated with an increased the risk of bleeding in all treatment groups.

MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if SRIs or clomipramine are used in combination with other drugs that affect hemostasis. Close clinical and laboratory observation for hematologic complications is recommended. Patients should be advised to promptly report any signs of bleeding to their physician, including pain, swelling, headache, dizziness, weakness, prolonged bleeding from cuts, increased menstrual
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flow, vaginal bleeding, nosebleeds, bleeding of gums from brushing, unusual bleeding or bruising, red or brown urine, or red or black stools.



clopidogrel ↔ escitalopram


Applies to: Plavix (clopidogrel), Lexapro (escitalopram)



Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.


MONITOR: Serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) may potentiate the risk of bleeding in patients treated with ulcerogenic agents and agents that affect hemostasis such as anticoagulants, platelet inhibitors, thrombin inhibitors, thrombolytic agents, or agents that commonly cause thrombocytopenia. The tricyclic antidepressant, clomipramine, is also a strong SRI and may interact similarly. Serotonin release by platelets plays an important role in hemostasis, thus SRIs may alter platelet function and induce bleeding. Published case reports have documented the occurrence of bleeding episodes in patients treated with psychotropic agents that interfere with serotonin reuptake. Bleeding events related to SRIs have ranged from ecchymosis, hematoma, epistaxis, and petechiae to life-threatening hemorrhages. Additional epidemiological studies have confirmed the association between use of these agents and the occurrence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and concurrent use of NSAIDs or aspirin was found to potentiate the risk. Preliminary data also suggest that there may be a pharmacodynamic interaction between SSRIs and oral anticoagulants that can cause an increased bleeding diathesis. Concomitant administration of paroxetine and warfarin, specifically, has been associated with an increased frequency of bleeding without apparent changes in the disposition of either drug or changes in the prothrombin time. Bleeding has also been reported with fluoxetine and warfarin, while citalopram and sertraline have been reported to prolong the prothrombin time of patients taking warfarin by about 5% to 8%. In the RE-LY study (Randomized Evaluation of Long-term anticoagulant therapy), SRIs were associated with an increased the risk of bleeding in all treatment groups.

MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if SRIs or clomipramine are used in combination with other drugs that affect hemostasis. Close clinical and laboratory observation for hematologic complications is recommended. Patients should be advised to promptly report any signs of bleeding to their physician, including pain, swelling, headache, dizziness, weakness, prolonged bleeding from cuts, increased menstrual flow, vaginal bleeding, nosebleeds, bleeding of gums from brushing, unusual bleeding or bruising, red or brown urine, or red or black stools.



citalopram ↔ escitalopram


Applies to: Celexa (citalopram), Lexapro (escitalopram)



Consumer information for this interaction is not currently available.


MONITOR: The central nervous system effects of escitalopram may be additive with those of other centrally-acting drugs.

MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised when escitalopram is prescribed in combination with other centrally-acting drugs. Patients should be counseled to avoid hazardous activities requiring mental alertness and motor coordination until they know how these agents affect them, and to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.


No other interactions were found between your selected drugs.
Note: this does not necessarily mean no interactions exist. ALWAYS consult with your doctor or pharmacist.


Other drugs that your selected drugs interact with



Interactions between your selected drugs and food



oxycodone ↔ food


Applies to: OxyContin (oxycodone)



Do not drink alcohol or use medications that contain alcohol while you are being treated with oxyCODONE. This can increase nervous system side effects such as dizziness, drowsiness, difficulty concentrating, and impairment in thinking and judgment. In addition, you may be at greater risk for serious side effects such as respiratory depression, low blood pressure, fainting, coma, and even death. You may also want to avoid or limit the consumption of grapefruit and grapefruit juice, which can significantly increase the blood levels of oxyCODONE in some people. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :



I hope that this information is helpful to you.

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Warm regards,

Elliott, LPCC, NCC :

Elliott, MAE, LPCC, NCC, CCMHC

Elliott, LPCC, NCC, Psychotherapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 7662
Experience: 35 years of experience as a Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, National Certified Counselor and a college professor.
Elliott, LPCC, NCC and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you
Expert:  Elliott, LPCC, NCC replied 1 year ago.
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