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DrFee
DrFee, Psychologist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 437
Experience:  I help people overcome anxiety and enjoy life again.
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I have been driving on freeways for thirty-five years. A couple

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I have been driving on freeways for thirty-five years. A couple of years ago I had my first attack on a long bridge I used to love to drive on. Sweat, could not get air, car seeemed out of control, what a siezure may feel like. It seems to happen more and more, and
I think about it constantly. Taking a small dose of xanax. What about Seredyn? Worth
a try? Joe

DrFee :

Hello! Please remember that my response is for information only, we are not establishing a therapeutic relationship.


 

DrFee :

I have 20+ years of experience working with people who have anxiety/panic attacks.


 

DrFee :

In my experience, natural remedies have been very "hit and miss" for my clients.


 

DrFee :

If you are going to try it, I recommend that you try it at a time when you don't have to drive over the bridge and see how it helps or doesn't help you.


 

DrFee :

Xanax is much more likely to be effective, but you have to keep in mind it does not cure the problem.


 

DrFee :

In the case of having a panic attack on a bridge that you previously drove over anxiety free for 35 years --there were other triggers that came into play during that first panic attack.


 

DrFee :

However, panic attacks can be "contagious," because the constant thinking about it and anticipation of another attack makes it more likely for future attacks to occur


 

DrFee :

Hi --


 

DrFee :

I stopped to get your reaction so far.


 

Customer:

Here, on the phone at work

DrFee :

OK...I can either resume with you in awhile or go to the Q&A format, which is slower --you can respond later in the day if you like.


 


 

Customer:

Had one today getting on the freeway, had to pull over. Is therepy the answer for a cure?

Customer:

Did you receive my response?

DrFee :

Hi...sorry about that


 

DrFee :

Therapy is the best approach to get your anxiety under control


 

DrFee :

I specifically recommend Cognitve Behavioral Therapy (CBT).


 

DrFee :

You can read about it here: www.mindovermood.com and here www.nacbt.org/whatiscbt.htm


 

DrFee :

It should include psychoeducation about anxiety, help identifying triggers (I can talk more about triggers with you) and help implementing strategies for keeping anxiety at a normal level.


 

DrFee :

There's lots of triggers for panic attacks. I've divided them into 2 categories-- External and Internal. External triggers are always linked with Internal triggers. The triggers happen fast, are often subtle, so it appears that the panic attack is "coming out of the blue"


 

DrFee :

External triggers include anything perceived by the senses --sight/sound/smell/taste and "overstimulation" (too much going on) and "Understimulation" (not enough going on), and for some --flourescent lights.


 

DrFee :

Internal triggers include: thoughts, feelings, memories, body sensations, and fears (of going crazy, losing control, or dying). Being too hot, tired, hungry are body sensations that can trigger anxiety even relaxation can trigger panic because it's a body sensation.


 

DrFee :

The triggers are subtle and can occur very quickly.


 

DrFee :

And can be connected to one another.


 

DrFee :

Essentially, the brain perceives that "danger" is present and reacts --to help us fight, run away from, or freeze in the face of danger.


 

DrFee :

One huge problem is that the brain does not know the difference between "real" danger and perceived danger. If you had to fight off an attacker, the danger is very real, in your face so to speak.


 

DrFee :

But --when your anxiety gets triggered by a body sensation (common on a bridge), then a thought associated with that body sensation, "What if I have another attack?" the body gets you ready just as if you had to fight off an attacker.


 

DrFee :

I'm going to pause here --not sure you are here or if you've read all of that.


 


 

Customer:

Thanks.Any infor on Seredyn or is Xanax better until I can check CBT

DrFee :

As you know Serdyn is a herbal remedy and Xanax is a prescription drug. Xanax works great for a lot of people, in my experience the herbal remedies are really "hit or miss"

DrFee :

Some people think they are great, others notice no difference at all.


 

DrFee :

They aren't regulated by the FDA, as you might know.


 

DrFee :

I'd ask the pharmacist about any concerns about mixing the two --sometimes that's not advised.


 

Customer:

Thanks for your help. I think I will ask my Dr and give it a try. Also check out your links.

DrFee :

OK. You are very welcome. I wish you all the best and that you get some good help soon.


 

DrFee and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you

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