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TherapistMarryAnn
TherapistMarryAnn, Therapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 5770
Experience:  Over 20 years experience specializing in anxiety, depression, drug and alcohol, and relationship issues.
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KATE MC COY Why would an MD prescribe Celexa if there is no panic disorder and no social

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KATE MC COY
Why would an MD prescribe Celexa if there is no panic disorder and no social anxiety disorder ? This also says it is px' ed for major depressive disorder. The possible side effects are frightening, I read them and did not start to take this drug. for several months, I decided to try it today and took one pill.

If you are feeling uncomfortable with taking Celexa, then don't do it. It is mainly prescribed for depression. It is an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) which helps increase the amount of serotonin in your brain so you feel better. It is sometimes prescribed to help panic disorder, though it's main purpose is to alleviate depression.

 

Anytime you are prescribed medication you feel uncomfortable taking, you should contact your doctor and let them know you will not be using it. Your doctor needs to work with you to help you find medication you are comfortable with. If the doctor will not work with you, you may need to find a new one that will. Doctors that do not listen to your needs are more likely to prescribe medication that is wrong for you.

 

If you were not evaluated by a psychiatrist or therapist for depression, you may want to take that step first. While doctors are helpful with prescribing medication when you are having trouble functioning on a day to day basis, a mental health professional needs to evaluate you and provide a diagnosis to determine your long term treatment needs. A psychiatrist should then take over your medication, if it is determined you need it.

 

Kate

TherapistMarryAnn and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.
Now days finding a decent medical doctor is a challenge, many offices have a one or two month waiting time, are totally impersonal, or worse. This doctor just says, ''Loose weight'' and thinks that it means something to me. Or that it is possible, I'd have already lost weight if I had been able to, had the ability to do so. Easy words, not an easy reality. Not for me.

It is a challenge, I know. You may want to ask your friends and family for suggestions for a good doctor. It may take a few tries, but there are good doctors out there. And the effort you make will be better than trying to deal with someone who won't work with you and possibly make you worse because they will not listen.

 

Kate

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
Yes and no both. This MD has been right on 99% since I started seeing him about 8 years ago. That impresses me about him. He got me through the gastro-by-pass, all the qualifying, then the preparations for the plastic surgery operationss in Costa Rica, very helpful, very. He is busy, all the time, but I can always get an appointment and he knows me. The blind spot is that he is extremely thin, has been all his life according to him, and has absolutely no idea of my trauma in this area.

Oh and once he did not explain why he wanted some tests. I did not do the tests and had serious trouble. I ended up in a hospital in PA for a couple weeks, operations and upper GI and lower GI, internal bleeding to collapse. He was extremely angry about that. I had not understood the importance of the tests he had ordered, so I did not do them. I am not one to just follow orders I have not verified or that have not been explained, actually both. He is a no-nonsense kind of person, I like that, and practice's no nonsense medicine.

I really want somebody effective and direct, not a baby sitter. You have no idea how difficult it is to find a doctor here and especially more like one who takes my HMO. Another heads up, I have no family except for my husband and young son, and another son in the ARmy. My friends have all died off in the neighborhood or moved away when Pan AM closed in '91 and most have not kept in touch, anyway, a doctor in another state is not much good for me.

Diet doctors are just too expensive and not covered by most insurance either . Truth. There is nothing that anybody can tell me that I don't already know except Why on earth I keep on eating, over eating, grazing, when I am technically full of food. I have the experience and knowledge to create perfect diets, balanced, excellent nutrition, etc etc. I just do not have the ability to stay on one myself. This is the nightmare reality that led me to the surgeon and the gastro by pass in the first place.

My problem is in my head and lack of ability to limit food intake. I keep searching my own mind for the answer almost all the time. Comparing my thinking at past times when I was so successful at being able to just go without food and feel fine about it to now. Trying to open the window to my soul, so to speak, about this with me.

Hello,

 

I can understand your struggle finding a doctor. Most people go through the same thing when searching for the right balance of bedside manner and skill in a doctor. You can only do what you are happy with. If you feel your current doctor is very skilled and you have limited resources, you may have to cope with him until your choices open up and you can find someone else. From your description, it sounds like the doctor has somewhat of a controlling personality. Once you know this, you can try to work with it or around it. Also, insurances add and lose doctors so you may be able to check back with them every few months to see if they have added anyone you may want to try.

 

Diet doctors are ok, but if your issue with eating is about your emotions, then a therapist is a better choice for treatment. Getting to the root of why you feel as you do is not going to be fixed by a diet, like you said.

 

You may want to start by writing down how you feel when you eat. Keep a diary of when you eat, what you eat and what you feel. Identifying your emotions at the time you graze or overeat can pinpoint the emotions underneath and help you begin to address them. Starting any type of diet or trying to cut back now may not be a good idea yet until you can find out what is going on emotionally first.

 

Kate

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Customer: replied 4 years ago.

''''You may want to start by writing down how you feel when you eat. Keep a diary of when you eat, what you eat and what you feel. Identifying your emotions at the time you graze or overeat can pinpoint the emotions underneath and help you begin to address them. Starting any type of diet or trying to cut back now may not be a good idea yet until you can find out what is going on emotionally first.''''

YOU JUST wrote this to me and it is the most electric eye opener to me that I have had in too many decades. Of course, this is perhaps the only way for a valid start for me to understand, to identify , why and what . I am going to do exactly this from this moment on, writing it all down, how I feel, what I feel , while I am grazing and over eating. I always carry a tablet in my purse and pens, long years of habit, so I can easily do this, I just never thought of it in connection with my serious , life threatening problems of obesity.

At one point long ago, some doctor or other did tell me to write down every bite that I put in my mouth, and I remember being shocked at how much I was really consuming even back then, but I stoped doing that and forgot about it until now. Thank you, XXXXX XXXXX so much. Now I have an additional tool to help me try to understand why I am killing myself with food.

You're welcome! I'm glad it helped. Overeating, if it's not caused by a physical problem, is almost always emotional. Writing your emotions down when you eat something (even if it's just a small taste of something) can help pinpoint which emotions are triggering your eating. It is a good place to start.

 

Let me know how it goes,

 

Kate

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