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Brad The Therapist
Brad The Therapist, LCPC
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 549
Experience:  10 years of experience in working with youth and adults
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I put my first hypomanic episode down to a supernatural agent

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I put my first hypomanic episode down to a supernatural agent of cosmic significance (God) because I didn't realise my feelings of immense well- being were down to doparminergic activity. I thought I had a calling from God. When I was in hospital, I asked to see a catholic priest and asked him if he could get a calling from God, could the same thing not happen to me? When I told my psychiatrist of the encounter, he thought I had a good point and I was discharged from hospital.

It seems that God routinely and indiscriminately targets parts of the Irish Republic to call on male humans to do his bidding. I presumed that such a calling would induce a state of euphoric happiness that would inform every atom of ones being, yet the care-worn ordinariness that emmanates from the majority of catholic priests I have met suggests otherwise. In short, do you think anyone who claims to have a calling is delusional?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Mental Health
Expert:  Brad The Therapist replied 5 years ago.

Brad The Therapist :

Thank you for your question as this is very intriguing. Before I answer your question, I wonder what your intentions are for this question. For example, are you looking for a confirmation or denial of your belief?

Customer:

Most of the psychiatrists I have been involved with have been atheists, so my feeling is that they reject out of hand the notion of supernatural activity. I'm pretty much agnostic these days. For me the notion of an omnipotent being in a possibly infinite universe having a controlling interest in the thoughts and day to day activities of six billion humans unlikely. However at the time of my first hypomanic experience, I was convinced otherwise, and feel that if I had trained to be a priest nobody would have batted an eye lid and I would not have been hospitalised.

Brad The Therapist :

I definitely agree with what you are saying in terms of having a calling or a spiritual awakening. I believe that spiritual callings can be detrimental to a person as well if it affects one's functioning. For example, if you had your spiritual calling while you are hypomanic, why doesn't the calling happen when you are not? Do you believe that all priest had some neurological event happen to have their calling as well?

Customer:

I think the notion of a genuine "calling" rather than a predisposition to religion has to be pretty momentous. From my own point, I as fully functional in that I went to work on a daily basis, did not neglect myself and was promoted. This went on for 4 years. At one point I was sectioned under the Mental Health Act for being elated, when I was actually mildly disgruntled. After a couple of weeks I told the Psychiatrist that I was over the moon. He asked me why. I told him it was because I was not elated any more. This is pure conjecture but I think if Jesus really existed 2000 years ago, well before the advent of modern psychiatry, he was hypomanic or experiencing frontal lobe epilepsy. If one is experiencing a hypomanic episode, the feeling, certainly with me is tht it confers so many benefits, it is difficult to imagine that anything is wrong.

Brad The Therapist :

I agree, I have heard from other patients that being hypomanic allowed them to accomplish so many things and enjoy the feelings they are experiencing. However, the consequence of hypomania is the depression, which makes the hypomania not worth it for some. In terms of your experience, I am surprised that you were involuntarily hospitalized for your hypomanic state. Typically if there were questions around your functioning or risky behaviors, than providers sometimes have their patients hospitalzied

Customer:

Well, that's the thing. I never experienced the depression for the first five years. The depression in my opinion was the result of being bludgeoned with powerful anti-psychotic drugs and mood stabilizers that caused anxiety memory loss and substantially reduced creativity. It strikes me that being morbidly depressed is more socially acceptable than being happy and exuberant. In short overly happy people boil a lot of other people's piss.

Brad The Therapist :

Reading your post and your original question, I am not sure if I have been helpful to you. Do you have any other questions?

Customer:

Course you have. Thank you for your patience Brad. I appreciate it must be wearing having to deal with so many people's problems on a day to day basis. I remain ambivalent abot the psychiatric profession vis a vis manic depression. Forgive the crude analogy but in the 19th century psychiatry was like cutting someone's head off with a rusty knife. Now they've moved up to the axe - messy, violent and often unnecessary.

Brad The Therapist :

I appreciate your feedback. I agree that the history of psychology and psychiatry is often scary to say the least, but I am happy to say that trainng, science, and technology of the field has vastly improved. I do not blame you of your perspective of psychiatry as you have been through a lot through the hospitalizations, side effects, etc. However, you have many strengths going for you such as intellegence and insight. As you have commented on my patience, I am facinated with the human mind and behavior and learn from my clients daily, including our discussion today. I appreciate your questions since they do come up. I wish you luck!

Customer:

Thanks again Brad. I'm not depressed or manic at the moment, in fact I feel like I did in 1999 before this happened. Now that my faith in God has been severely rocked, I think it's unlikely I will become delusional. The penny has dropped as we say in England. My interest in art and philosophy and of course social interraction sustains me. I know this may be odd but I think everyone should experience a bit of hypomania. I don't regret it. I'd like to recommend The Hedonistic Imperative by David Pearce. It's online and it's food for thought.

Brad The Therapist :

Great! Thanks for the recommendation.

Customer:

Good night and best of luck. You do a great job

Brad The Therapist :

I hope you consider pressing the accept button on the button. Best of luck to you.

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