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Ask Selah R, M.S. LPC Your Own Question
Selah R, M.S. LPC
Selah R, M.S. LPC, Therapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 582
Experience:  Licensed Professional Counselor; over 13+ yrs exp working with adults, teens, & families/couples.
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Selah R, M.S. LPC is online now
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i was here earlyier im lookin 4something i can relate to myself

This answer was rated:

i was here earlyier im lookin 4something i can relate to myself ive been told by some of my closest friends at times i turn into somebody they dont know! they even have a name 4 that person and this alarms me! my best friend when she see's this person she will have nothing to do with me! i feel alarmed because... of that and when it takes over i feel like im watching a movie or something im not quite sure at one point i laughed histaricly and i remember tellin myself it isnt funny and it wasnt funny i threatined somebody a close friend y would i laugh about that?? thats not me

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Thank you for trusting JustAnswer with your important question.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

What you describe can be part of a dissociative disorder. In dissociative disorders people can feel removed from themselves, feel like they are watching a movie, and feel like they are saying/doing things that aren't like them. These experiences can be more frequent and more severe when you are under stress.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Asking your friends for more information may help you better understand how often this is happening, and if they see any pattern (such as stress levels, alcohol, other significant changes in mood, etc).

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

You may also want to consider talking to a counselor who is familiar with dissociative disorders to help figure out what is causing this, how severe it is, and what your treatment options are.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

You may also want to take the Dissociative Experiences Scale online at http://counsellingresource.com/quizzes/des/index.html to help you figure out how severe your dissociation is.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Sincerely,

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Selah

Customer:

I think i should mention too i was involved in a bad car accident date being 5/16/00 i put my head thru the windshield.. the main part that got damaged was the left side of my brain mainly the frontal left lobe i lost close to half and thats when this started... I was mis diagnosed with a bipolar disorder and did take meds for a while but that was no good.. I am aware since the accident i did lose a part of myself although i am better now than i was then which does indacate i have healed but not completely... The main thing i do notice is i can't handle emotions like normal people can i have what i call overloads and what happens is i'm overwhelmed with what i'm feeling and it takes over at times... My solution to this isnt the best but i live fairly detached from emotion, anyway i wanted to say ty selah your help means alot the only other person i've talked to is my bestfriend about all this and i love her t death but at times she's not the brightest light on the block always so i decided to seek an outside source once again ty

Customer:

john

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Traumatic brain injury, strokes, and other neurological damage can cause huge changes in personality, temperment, anger/frustration tolerance, and tolerating stress. I have worked with a few clients who have had significant changes to their personality and their anger levels, especially frontal lobe injuries, because it seems to reduce the tolerance for stress and reduces the intern censor that keeps you from saying or doing things out of stress/anger. Neurocognitive testing can help identify these issues, and some people have had success in managing their symptoms with medications (some of the same medications used for seizures, Bipolar, and Depression). But the brain heals slowly, and if the damage is too severe you may be stuck with some of these changes forever. Then your best tool is educating yourself, your family, and your friends about your issues, and learning ways of trying to better manage your stress and anger. Also identifying your triggers that make you more prone to acting "out of character" such as inadequate sleep, high stress, low blood sugar levels, etc.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Sincerely,

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Selah

Here are two books that may be useful:

For you and your family & friends:
Mindstorms: Living with Traumatic Brain Injury by John W. Cassidy MD and Lee Woodruff

Workbook style for you:
The Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Workbook: Your Program for Regaining Cognitive Function & Overcoming Emotional Pain (New Harbinger Self-Help Workbook) by Douglas J. Mason and Gottfried Jean-Louis
Selah R, M.S. LPC and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

what u told me really ment alot ty so much for this