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Ask Dr. Ed Wilfong Your Own Question
Dr. Ed Wilfong
Dr. Ed Wilfong, Psychologist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 1528
Experience:  Twenty-five years treating all ages; Specialities: psychopharmacology & diagnosis, MMPI-2, testing.
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Hello Dr. Wilfong, At the risk of sounding monotonous, I am

Resolved Question:

Hello Dr. Wilfong,
At the risk of sounding monotonous, I am just still really suffering with my OCD. I keep having these awful "flashbacks" that I for a minute think are real, but after a moment's more thought I realize that I am remembering either past dreams (that were the result of high anxiety) or past thoughts that I have had. Is this a "normal" symptom of OCD? It's as though I give my old thoughts and dreams so much importance that I honestly wonder for awhile if they happened. After the anxiety subsides a little bit, I can see more clearly that I am just remembering old anxious moments, but it is so disturbing to me how vivid my memories of these thoughts are. I have always had an oddly exact memory about things, so could this just be part of my mental problems? I don't think it is derealization or dissociaton, per se, because I am thinking back on things that are merely the product of my own imagination. Can someone become so anxious that their own thoughts can become traumatic to them? Could I be remembering thoughts that disturbed me so much that I am almost traumatized by them? I know that sounds odd, but I just can't think of another explanation.

Thank you again for your help.
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Mental Health
Expert:  Dr. Ed Wilfong replied 6 years ago.

Dr. Ed Wilfong :

Actually this is beginning to sound more like PTSD than OCD. IN either event, treatment is the same. Your dosage of prozac is inadequate to treat either. It typically take 60-80mg to treat either disorder. Some people cannot tolerate that much Prozac (stimulation) but other SSRIs work as well. My guess is you are having highly intrsive thoughts (OCD) but it is unusual for them to occur during sleep. You symptoms sound like repressed trauma from childhood is finding it's way to surface. It is usually some type of abuse/neglect. I have seen people repress (forget) these memories into their 50s. Psychotherapy is especially helpful.

Customer :

I know that you said that before, and I understand why you would think so. However, don't you think it is odd that I remember dreams from so long ago? Also, the dreams that disturb me most are the ones where I am harming others, not others harming me. Also, how does it explain my fear of my own bad thoughts? I truly do know they are only thoughts, but the emotional reaction that I have to them at the time feels the exact same when I think about them now. Also, my intrusive thoughts are almost like little "vignettes", for lack of a better word. Like very detailed stories. What disturbs me most is that I have such an emotional response to the remembrance of these thoughts, which strikes me as odd because they are just thoughts.

Dr. Ed Wilfong :

There is a condition where there is a mild schizophrenic tendency that is controlled by OCD (OCD keeps bizarre experiences under control). At time treating the OCD makes the bizarre thoughts worse. Personally, the only way I can diagnose it is with the MMPI2 as it is a tough differential diagnosis. The vivid anxious memories being so intense may be a part of OCD. You really need to see someone good at diagnosis to find out.

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