How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Selah R, M.S. LPC Your Own Question
Selah R, M.S. LPC
Selah R, M.S. LPC, Therapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 582
Experience:  Licensed Professional Counselor; over 13+ yrs exp working with adults, teens, & families/couples.
3241695
Type Your Mental Health Question Here...
Selah R, M.S. LPC is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

What are some of the issues that a teen may have after there

This answer was rated:

What are some of the issues that a teen may have after there brother comitted suicide? Can that adversely affect the child as far as them contemplating the same thing? The age of the boy whose brother commited suicide is 15.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Thank you for trusting JustAnswer with your important question.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Issues that we would look for in a sibling in this situation would be:

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Depression - either that existed before the sibling died or that has worsened following the suicide

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Increased risk of suicidal thoughts and attempts - this is true for friends, school peers, and others close to the situation

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Anxiety or Guilt - fear that someone else will leave them suddenly or commit suicide, guilt over having "not done enough" to prevent the suicide, or guilt over "not know it was going to happen". Sometimes called "Survivor's Guilt" when they feel like they should be the ones who died instead of their sibling

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Remorse or Grief - Remorse for not having a chance to say good things before the sibling died, and grief over the loss

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Anger or Shame - Anger at the sibling for causing such pain and turmoil in the family, and shame or depression for feeling angry

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Mood Swings - this is especially true as the survivor begins to have "good days" but then feels like they are not allowed to feel normal or happy yet because the family is still in mourning, or because they feel they shouldn't be allowed to have joy as part of the survivor's guilt

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Withdrawal - the concern and attention from family and friends can be overwhelming, and the survivor may pull away from social contact in order to try to sort out their own emotions. This may increase their risk of self-injury, suicidal thoughts, and substance abuse as ways of "checking out" or "getting away from the pain."

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Counseling and keeping a close eye on the child is highly recommended. It is also recommended that the parents seek counseling to help them cope with their loss, their own emotional baggage from having a child choose suicide, and helping them move through the grief in healthy ways so they can better repair the family unit for themselves and the surviving siblings.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

A period of increased depression, withdrawal, crying, decreased performance at school, and other symptoms of normal bereavement or grief are expected. The survivor child may go through a period of denial where they appear to be fine, or they put on a mask that they are doing ok to protect the parents. Parents and school counselors are encouraged to keep an eye on kids immediately after the incident, 2-4 weeks later when the shock starts wearing off, and 3-6 months after the event when progress should be seen in normal grief. If the symptoms continue to worsen, or do not show signs of improvement after that time, counseling and medication may be needed to help the survivor child move forward.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Hope that helps,

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Selah

Selah R, M.S. LPC and other Mental Health Specialists are ready to help you

Related Mental Health Questions