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Ask Selah R, M.S. LPC Your Own Question
Selah R, M.S. LPC
Selah R, M.S. LPC, Therapist
Category: Mental Health
Satisfied Customers: 582
Experience:  Licensed Professional Counselor; over 13+ yrs exp working with adults, teens, & families/couples.
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I am a 51 yo female who was stricken by Guillian-Barre Syndrome

Resolved Question:

I am a 51 yo female who was stricken by Guillian-Barre Syndrome 1 and a half years ago. My symptoms at this time are significant pain in my pelvis, low back, and legs that I take methadone 25mg a day and oxyIR 60mg a day (These meds don't seem to have an effect on much except my pain and slow bowels), moderate weakness in my legs, and what seems to be a complete inability to reach orgasm.
I must admit also that with the huge changes this has wrought in my life (I am still unable to work as an ICU nurse, which I did for 17 yrs) my depression has become significant over the past 4 to 6 months. For this a take Effexor 375mg (divided) daily with minimal effect, although I hate to think what my crying jags would look like if I weren't taken it.
I live in Key West and am seeing a phychiatrist, having had only one appt so far, but he seemed to glaze over when I mentioned my problem with orgasm and did not address the statement at all.
So my question is this: How can I get treatment in this secluded area? Are there therapists available through skype perhaps, or can you suggest a book that my husband and I can work through? Nothing I/we have tried has worked i.e.; massage, masterbation, toys, no toys, all about me with return stimulation discouraged, water masterbation, ect.
Thanks in advance for your thoughtful reply.
Michelle
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Mental Health
Expert:  Selah R, M.S. LPC replied 5 years ago.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Thank you for trusting JustAnswer with your important question.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

The first thing I'd recommend is to give the psychiatrist more time. They probably did not address the orgasm issue because the depression and the pain meds can both kill sexual desire and sexual performance. As your psychiatrist gets to know you better, they may be willing to try different antidepressants which may have lower sexual side effects. They may take your sexual side effects more seriously or as a higher priority if they see that the depression improves but the sexual effects aren't improving.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

You may also want to talk to your regular physician or an OB/GYN about trying estrogen cream that can be used to help increase your sex drive and may help you reach orgasm. Your doctor may also do more in-depth bloodwork to determine if your hormone levels are in need of stronger medication to help correct them. I have seen many women with depression who have not responded well to antidepressants, but once they started estrogen therapy they saw huge improvement in mood, energy, pain levels, and other symptoms that had previously been chalked up as "mental" or depression related.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

From a sex therapy perspective, you need to look at if you're getting sexual pleasure, and if what you're getting is satisfying. You may have to stop trying to have an orgasm to take that stress of you and your partner. For most women orgasm isn't the goal, it's a byproduct of adequate sexual stimulation and adequate emotional bond or intimacy with their partner. If either of those are missing, the chances of orgasm decrease.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Some books:

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

How to Have an Orgasm...As Often As You Want by Rachel Swift

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

There are therapists you can talk to via Skype and other electronic means.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

http://www.liveperson.com/experts/professional-counseling/relationship-issues/sex-therapy/

Customer :

this is all very good information. the link above is a list of therapist that work online?

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Yes, Live Person have online counselors

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

That's the link to their professionals who are specialize in Sex Therapy issues

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

You can also look at http://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/prof_search.php for therapists near you who may specialize in sex therapy.

Customer :

Oh...very good then. I am so glad I contacted you. I suppose I have quite a period of muddling through yet but the info you have provided me is a great start!

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

But my recommendation would be to get a checkup with your OB/GYN first and rule out the role of estrogen before spending money on sex therapy.

Customer :

I believe I have already gone to that site but I will double check.

Customer :

What do you think about the plant estrogen creams?

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

They are worth trying, especially if your natural estrogen levels are fairly normal but the antidepressants and pain medications are just making it harder for your body to respond to sex.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

There has even been research on using Viagra in women who are having sexual issues due to antidepressants, but your insurance may not pay for it. But it's another avenue worth looking at.

Customer :

OK. Thank you very much for all of this information. It is greatly appreciated.

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Good luck!

Customer :

thanks!

Selah R, M.S. LPC :

Thanks for using JustAnswer :-)

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