How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr Chaithanya Your Own Question
Dr Chaithanya
Dr Chaithanya, General Physician, Medical Researcher, All medical and health questions answered.
Category: Medical
Satisfied Customers: 798
Experience:  General Physician, Family medicine, Internal medicine, all age groups.
88123236
Type Your Medical Question Here...
Dr Chaithanya is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Microbiologist RESEARCH SCIENTIST expert ONLY.. not just a

Customer Question

Microbiologist RESEARCH SCIENTIST expert ONLY.. not just a physician,
(please no experts like Rick, Phil, Thomas, etc. thanks)There is a shelf-stable product with an viable Lactobacillus, suspended in sunflower and coconut oil, with a long shelf life at room temp. Regarding bacterial stages, how does a bacteria (in this case anaerobic) survive this long in an undesired environment and without food source? And what does it take to become live and active again. e.g. let’s say you put this bacteria solution on your skin, what’s the ideal way to make it switch from that dormant shelf state, to a state of feeding and multiplying, (especially since it's anaerobic). And how do I determine if this strain can cause infection if enter through broken skin?
Submitted: 5 months ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  TheGermDoctor replied 5 months ago.

Lactobacilli are facultative anaerobes, not obligate anaerobes- If obligate anaerobes, they would die in the presence of O2-

It goes into a "dormant state" when preserved/ dried as in probiotic products- They do quality control tests, (for what it's worth- remember these are not FDA regulated so the level of quality control varies....) to assure a certain number of live colonies will be present per dose-

Lactobacilli then reactivate under the conditions in the human body- in the small intestine

The surface of skin would not be ideal for growth- which depends on moisture, temp, pH etc... Clinically however, we rarely do see some patients that get "bacteremic" with probiotic strains- the most classic example that has been reported in the literature is patients who have a G-tube ( a feeding tube through the skin) who are on probiotics and presumable some of the organisms colonize the skin when administered and then occasionally can lead to systemic infectiions- but this is uncommon of course..

Please rate the reply if that answered your question

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
Hi, thanks for the info. I didn't yet see the answer.
"And what does it take to become live and active again. e.g. let’s say you put this bacteria solution on your skin, what’s the ideal way to make it switch from that dormant shelf state, to a state of feeding and multiplying, (especially since it's anaerobic)."
So how do I take that dormant Lactobacilli and activate it to live on the skin? What specific solution providing a certain moisture, pH, food, etc? What is the Lactobacilli preferred temp range for growth? or does it depend greatly on the strain?
Expert:  TheGermDoctor replied 5 months ago.

Probiotic lactobacilli are not prepared for cutaneous use, and there is no rationale for such usage- There are GI and vaginal preps, not cutaneous- with conditions comparable to the GI tract or vaginal mucosa appropriate for usage.

I would not advise topical use of lactobacilli and can think of no therapeutic usage for such

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
that's the conclusion I came to and so I thought to come on JustAnswer in order to ask the ideal prep for cutaneous delivery of lactobacilli.
Expert:  TheGermDoctor replied 5 months ago.

Well glad I could help, as much as the data is "out there".

Please rate my reply for my time and effort

Thanks

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
I'm not understanding.
If you are saying you don't know the answer to this question, can you release the question to a different expert. Thanks.
Expert:  TheGermDoctor replied 5 months ago.

I am not saying I don't know the answer- I have given you the answer. Re-read it if necessary.

You will not receive any other "better" answer from this site or elsewhere.

Expert:  TheGermDoctor replied 5 months ago.

Please supply a rating at this time to acknowledge the time I have already provided you for this question.

Expert:  Dr Chaithanya replied 5 months ago.

Hello,

I'm another expert as per your request

Dr Chaithanya here, Medical researcher as well

Lactobacillus are given for treatment of few skin conditions as well, like eczema, acne, atopic dermatitis. Recent researches prove this

They are given as per oral even for the treatment of skin conditions.

They are nutritionally fastidious, requiring rich media to grow (carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, fatty acid esters, salts, nucleic acid derivatives, and vitamins

Please study this link,

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2593565/

This is so extensive, and clear, that you will not be left with any doubts further about Lactobacillus

Hope this helps

Please leave a positive rating at the top right corner of the page, so that I'm compensated from justanswer for helping you.

Have a good day

Thank you very much

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
Ah yes, I remember reading that article 6-7 years ago.
It was one of the first I read on the subject.
I will read it again to see if I can find the answer.
Expert:  Dr Chaithanya replied 5 months ago.

Can you click on 5 rating at the top right corner of the page. I appreciate that.

Expert:  Dr Chaithanya replied 5 months ago.

Dear, do you have further questions? Can you kindly leave a positive rating? so that, my answer counts.

Customer: replied 5 months ago.
I am currently reading the article again to see if I can find the answer myself, as to the ideal growing medium for my specific strain of Lactobacilli.
Expert:  Dr Chaithanya replied 5 months ago.

Can you leave a positive rating?

I can answer any question after the rating