How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dr. David Your Own Question
Dr. David
Dr. David, Board Certified Physician
Category: Medical
Satisfied Customers: 42872
Experience:  Experienced Physician trained in New York City. I'm ready to help.
41363181
Type Your Medical Question Here...
Dr. David is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

My fiancé needs a medical opinion stating that the following

Customer Question

Hello,
My fiancé needs a medical opinion stating that the following is possible.
Some background:
My fiancé is unfairly involved in a CPS (Child Protective Services) case, and her daughter has been taken from our home. She submits to random drug screenings, and calls each morning to determine if she will be taking a screening that day. Her case manager should be providing results of these screenings, but has not done so unless specifically asked. Even then, her case manager is still lackadaisical with her response time.
In the beginning of the case, my fiancé was very honest with the CPS agents and admitted to taking Percocet that was not hers. She was given a screening on that day, and the test showed positive for Percocet. Since then, she has refrained from doing such things. She wants her daughter back badly and although she’s incredibly angry about all that is happening, she is abiding by the many rules and regulations.
Upon the most recent request for the results of the drug screenings, we were both very surprised to find that she tested positive for morphine. Upon researching online, we found that the poppy seed “myth” is no myth at all, and indeed can cause a positive for morphine. However, in addition, we found information about a substance called “thebaine”. It is present in the poppy seeds and, if screened for, is able to distinguish between poppy seed consumption vs illicit or prescription drug use. This has been brought to the attention of the case manager, but as expected, will go no-where. It would likely be safe to assume that the sample has since been disposed of and that testing it for thebaine is not an option. Hindsight is 20/20. With all known now, it would have been better to have not consumed any foods of question. But, as many are, we were under the impression the poppy seed myth was truly a myth and didn’t come to mind as any concern at all.
Information about thebaine can be found at this link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9288591
So, my question and request is 2 parts: 1. In your medical opinion, is it possible that poppy seed consumption can produce a positive result for morphine? 2. Also, can you produce a formal letter stating this? An additional question is: My assumption is that the original test samples that tested positive for morphine have been disposed of. Do you have any insight or suggestions concerning what to do - i.e. the validity of a doctor’s opinion vs re-testing the original samples?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Dr. David replied 1 year ago.

This is Dr. David

yes, eating poppy seeds can turn urine screening tests positive for opiates like morphine.

here are medical articles which say so

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=morphine%20and%20codeine%20on%20poppy%20seeds%20thevis

http://www.usada.org/can-poppyseeds-cause-a-positive-drug-test/

we can not give out letters to clients here.

if she screened positive for morphine, they still need to do a confirmatory MS/GC test

if she is not using morphine, the MS/GC confirmatory test will be negative.

ask if they did a confirmatory test yet.

let me know if you have questions.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
First off, the test was a saliva test.Yes, they did a confirmatory test using MS/GC. That confirmatory test came back positive. I am going to need a formal letter to submit to the court. Is there not a way around this limitation posed by just answer?
Expert:  Dr. David replied 1 year ago.

no, we are not allowed to submit letters for clients we can't see and can't examine.

we are here only to answer medical questions.

if she has a primary care doctor, she should bring those articles to her primary care doctor and ask for a letter.

if she has a gyn doctor, she can do the same thing.

or she can bring those medical articles to her lawyer or judge for review.

Related Medical Questions