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Dr. Thomas, MD
Dr. Thomas, MD, Board Certified Physician
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Experience:  Internal Medicine--practice all of internal medicine, all ages, family, also Integrative, CAM, etc
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Can Beta Blockers cause increaced blood alcohol concntrati

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Can Beta Blockers cause increaced blood alcohol concntration?
Hello
No
There is nothing that causes an increase other than the amount of alcohol.

The measure does vary individual per individual, depending on the amoutn consumed.

However, beta blockers do not cause an increase in any direct way.
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Customer: replied 3 years ago.

It was my impression that some medications such as beta blockers, blood thinners, gastronomical medications like Tagamant, potentially AF med like Flecainide could reduce metabolizing of alcohol therefore showing a higher level.

No in fact they do not change metabolism enough to significantly affect your alcohol level.
Even if you metabolism was slowed down, this would not change the accuracy of the alcohol level.
You might get rid of the alcohol level slower, but the level would still reflect an accurate alcohol blood content.
Make sense?

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Customer: replied 3 years ago.

I understand the reading is accurate but may not reflect a true representation of how much the individual drank because the body rid itself of the alcohol at a normal rate. Am I wrong?

In almost all instances that would not be correct.
Propanalol, just as the classic example of a beta blocker, might slow metabolism a little, but only in some people, and the mechanisms is not known as to how it does this. In addition, a slightly slower metabolism in general does not indicate any direct effect on alcohol degradation, in fact, it might speed up independently.

The direct interaction of the two drugs is to lower blood pressure, but not to affect the catabolism of propanalol.

So, you can not argue that your alcohol level would not reflect the amount you actually drank because you are on propanalol. There are too many factors involved.

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