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Dr. D. Love
Dr. D. Love, Doctor
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Experience:  Family Physician for 10 years; Hospital Medical Director for 10 years.
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What is Sara Agers syndrome

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What is Sara Agers syndrome
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Sara Agers syndrome is a rare genetic defect that can cause a variety of manifestations. The genetic defect is on the X chromosome and is expressed in males because there is no normal gene with which it is paired. Women can carry the gene and pass it on to about half of their sons, but a woman cannot be affected unless two genes are present, which can only occur is an affected male mated with a woman who carries the gene.

The most common manifestations are signs of excessive growth, such as in height, weight, or head size. However, it also can cause brain malformations and can cause mental retardation that can vary in severity from mild to severe.

If this was never discussed with you, it is possible that a doctor was wondering about the possibility of the disease, but was never confirmed. However, you can obtain a copy of your medical records to ascertain the context and what evaluation is the basis of any diagnosis.

If you have any further questions, please let me know.

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

I am sorry, but your comments do not describe me in any way. I am 78 years of age, I weigh 172, I am 5' 11" tall. This does not fit your "excessive growth" description which appears to have been copied from a medical dictionary. You certainly have not answered my question or my physician has made a major error.

I did not say that you had the syndrome. You asked what it was, and I provided the answer to that question. I'm sorry if it sounds like a definition, but your question was seeking a definition.

If you do not have any of the common manifestations of the syndrome and the doctors have never told you of the diagnosis, then it is more likely that you do not have the syndrome, and that this is primarily a failure of communication. If you will obtain a copy of your records, then the context of the comment and the basis of the comment can be determined.

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

While I was waiting for your reply, I reviewed the records and they

clearly list "Sara Agers syndrome" as a diagnosed "problem." In view of your answer, I could not have accomplished the items I listed if I, in deed, have the Sara Agers syndrome. I am sure you understand where I am coming from. I, up to this point, have total confidence in my doctors and am now confused as to their expertise. My records indicate clearly that I am retarded, but one does not achieve graduate degrees and still have the Sara Agers syndrome. Do you agree?

A person can have Sara Agers syndrome and not have any mental retardation at all. As noted above, Sara Agers syndrome can cause mental retardation, but that also means that it may not. In those people in which it can cause mental retardation, it can vary from mild to severe. The presence of Sara Agers syndrome does not preclude you from having accomplished any of these feats.

This is the same as saying that smoking can cause lung cancer or that high blood pressure can cause heart attacks. There are many people that smoke that do not develop lung cancer and many people with high blood pressure that do not develop a heart attack.

If you have your medical records, you can also look to find how the diagnosis was made.

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