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Dr Uzair
Dr Uzair, Doctor
Category: Medical
Satisfied Customers: 5935
Experience:  MBBS, FCPS (R) General Surgery. Years of experience in Emergency Medicine.
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I have a half golf ball sized bump on top of my left kneecap.

Resolved Question:

I have a half golf ball sized bump on top of my left kneecap. It feels like a jel pad under my skin. What could it possibly be?
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Dr Uzair replied 5 years ago.
Hi. Welcome to JustAnswer. I shall try my best to assist you while you are corresponding with me.

Q. How long has it been there for?

Q. Did you have any trauma to the knee?

Q. Is it tender?

Q. Do you take any medication?
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

its been there about two weeks now getting a little bigger. yes its alittle tender. you cant kneel on it. Ive had no trauma to it. I cleaned houses for 7 years and now Im a painter for13 years so ive been on my knees alot. Both knees have a tendency to want to bend the oppisite direction,and no i take no medication other than asprins.

Expert:  Dr Uzair replied 5 years ago.
Thanks for the details.

Your history and the physical appearance of the swelling you describe point towards this being a Ganglion cyst of the knee joint. This is a benign cyst that has a gel like material in it and is soft or rubbery to the touch and can often cause pain when pressure is applied on it.
These cysts form on joints. A ganglion is a cyst formed by the synovium (joint fluid) that is filled with a thick jelly-like fluid. Ganglions can follow local trauma to the tendon or joint, they usually form for unknown reasons.

They can be treated by aspiration and steroid injections as well as by surgery.
But the first thing you need to do is to get this examined by your PCP. A referral can then be made to an Orthopaedic surgeon who can suggest whether to operate on it or deal with it by other methods of treatment available. The Orthopaedic surgeon might also want to investigate the underlying cause of the cyst.
Hope this helps.
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