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Dr Jones, Board Certified MD
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Experience:  MD-Post graduation.10 years in handling and helping patients.Expert in emergencies and diagnosis.
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Can high risk hpv be passed through saliva if a person has

Resolved Question:

Can high risk hpv be passed through saliva if a person has a micro abrasion in their mouth?
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: Medical
Expert:  Dr Jones replied 6 years ago.

HPV transmission typically occurs through direct skin-to-skin contact, including genital-to-genital contact. Though virus levels are less in saliva compared to other body tissue transmission can occur . The chances of transmission can increase with micro abrasion or oral lesions related to HPV.

 

 

I hope I have been helpful to you,

 

POSITIVE FEEDBACK and BONUSES are always welcomed.

Please note that this information is not a substitute for a personal visit to the doctor

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
While it ranges as to when a person might notice a mouth wart from an hpv infection through saliva or kissing (w/ micro abrasion), is there an average time that something visible like this might occur i.e. 3 months, 1 year, etc.?

Expert:  Dr Jones replied 6 years ago.

Though its variable the symptoms can be obvious as early as 3 to 4 months.

 

 

I hope I have been helpful to you,

 

POSITIVE FEEDBACK and BONUSES are always welcomed.

Please note that this information is not a substitute for a personal visit to the doctor

Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Dr Jones, you have been great at giving me a knowledge foundation. I will compensate you dearly for the additional clarifications.

I would greatly appreciate further clarification on this statement "The chances of transmission can increase with micro abrasion or oral lesions related to HPV." What if my partner does not have visible signs of a lesion related to HPV and I kiss her (while having a micro abrasion from eating a chip)? Does this still hold true if no signs are visible and saliva is exchanged (while she is a possible carrier from us having oral sex) and I have a small cut from eating a chip?

Lastly, provided my wife and I have been married for 6 years, our dental visits have been normal, as has her pap smears (after 2 children). My concern is stemming from before our marriage, I had to much fun in college and had bumps on my shaft that went away and have not returned. Do I or any of my family members risk developing oral warts by transferring an invisible wart from my private, if I don't wash my hands for 15-20 seconds before handling food?

Has the medical community decided if our body clears HPV after so many years or if becomes dormant?
Expert:  Dr Jones replied 6 years ago.

HPV can be transmitted by mere physical contact (skin to skin contact) and with saliva even without any cut or abrasion also. And this chances of transmission by saliva are increased in case of cut or HPV related mouth lesions (mouth warts).

 

If your partner is symptomless carrier you have chances of getting the disease and it will depend on the viral load which you receive and your immunity.

 

And yes the virus remains dormant for very long periods even decades and the person can be source of possible infection without him/herself having any symptoms.

 

 

I hope I have been helpful to you,

 

POSITIVE FEEDBACK and BONUSES are always welcomed.

Please note that this information is not a substitute for a personal visit to the doctor

 

Dr Jones and 2 other Medical Specialists are ready to help you

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