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Ask Aggie Mac Master Your Own Question

Aggie Mac Master
Aggie Mac Master, Mac Genius
Category: Mac
Satisfied Customers: 316
Experience:  B.S. Biology from Texas A&M University and Long-time Mac User
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smb network drive disappears

Customer Question

I''m using and IBook, MAC OS X 10.4.11. I connect to a few shares on a windows 2003 Server. I''ve done this for quite a while without a problem. Now when I open the server and the share I can view the folders and files for about 5-7 seconds then the window just disappears.   Sometime I get a message saying that I am already connected to that server volume.   Can you help?   thanks
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Mac
Expert:  Aggie Mac Master replied 8 years ago.
Step One
Connect to your network drive in the usual manner. Either use the Command-K shortcut, or from the Menu Bar use Go -> Connect to Server. In either case, you’ll be presented with a Connect to Server dialog box. The server address should be specified as:


Click the Connect button and wait for Finder to connect to your network drive. If you have more than one shared folder set up on the drive you’ll be prompted for the folder that you want to connect to. Once Leopard has connected to the shared folder a new Finder window should open.

Step Two
Open Terminal from Applications -> Utilities -> Terminal. At the prompt, type the following command:

sudo smbclient -L NETWORK_DRIVE_NAME

The NETWORK_DRIVE_NAME refers to the the Windows name for your drive and is usually set using the configuration interface for the drive - this may be a web interface or an application, the exact details will depend on your specific drive. When you press Return, you’ll be prompted for your password. Type your password XXXXX press Return again. When you run this command, you should get a response like this:

Receiving SMB: Server stopped responding
session request to NETWORK_DRIVE_NAME failed (Call returned zero bytes (EOF))
Receiving SMB: Server stopped responding
session request to *SMBSERVER failed (Call returned zero bytes (EOF))

Although the Samba Client returns with an error message, don’t worry, you’re still on track to be able to browse the drive contents.

Step Three
Restart the Finder. This is achieved by typing the following command in Terminal:

sudo killall Finder

Once this command has been entered, the Leopard Finder will restart. You’ll notice that your Desktop icons disappear, as will any open Finder Windows. Your Desktop icons should reappear almost immediately.

Step Four
Repeat Step Three:

sudo killall Finder

Open a Finder Window, and under the Shared section your network drive should be listed. Click the drive name, and then double-click the shared folder name. You should now be able to browse the contents of the drive.

Important Notes
- I don’t know why, but the Finder has to be restarted twice for this work.

- The Terminal commands must be run using sudo or as root (using su), even if you are logged in as an adminsitrator. If you are an administrator, you’ll be able to run the smbclient command and the killall command, but the process just won’t work.
- I have no idea why this works, or how, I just know that it does work for me.

- I’d recommend that you close all open programs while doing this, just in case. Using the killall command may have some strange effects on open programs, or lead to system instability.