How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask LawTalk Your Own Question
LawTalk
LawTalk, Attorney
Category: Legal
Satisfied Customers: 36342
Experience:  I am a practicing attorney with more than 30 years of experience in the legal field.
15277592
Type Your Legal Question Here...
LawTalk is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

On 12-4-15 I filed a Federal Lawsuit against the US

Customer Question

On 12-4-15 I filed a Federal Lawsuit for damages against the US Department of Agriculture and the US Department of Agriculture the Office of the Inspector General.
I requested a jury trial. I just received a letter from the court saying "This is to advise you that you may consent to proceed to disposition of this case before a Magistrate Judge pursuant to 28-USC-636 (c). You may, however, without penalty, withhold your consent, and the case will be tried by the district court judge. Which is better? Advise within 30 days.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Legal
Expert:  LawTalk replied 1 year ago.

Good afternoon,

I'm Doug, and I'm sorry to hear of the confusion. My goal is to provide you with excellent service today.

In the federal court system, a Magistrate Judge is appointed by the District Court Judges to serve a renewable term of ten years, while a United States District Court Judge is appointed by the President of the United States and is tenured for life.

A Magistrate judge cannot try or sentence a person on a felony case, and because 90% or more of typical federal cases are felony cases, if you reject the offer to have a Magistrate Judge preside over your trial it may take you longer to get a trial date because of a felony case backlog.

Neither judge is truly better than the other. Both class of judges are highly skilled and you are not likely to see a difference in any verdict between the two. So really, neither one is better if you goal is to just get your case before the court at a jury trial.

You may reply back to me using the Reply link and I will be happy to continue to assist you until I am able to address your concerns, to your satisfaction.

Please be so kind as to rate my service to you. That is the only way I am credited for assisting you.

I wish you and yours the best this holiday season,

Doug

Customer: replied 1 year ago.

The Western District of New York has an ADR plan. Alternative Dispute Resolution. Each case must enter the ADR program and try to settle the lawsuit before trial. Do you know how it works. I filed Pro Se. I just received a list of 40 attorneys in the Rochester, NY area from the court. Mediation Attorneys that work with the court.

Expert:  LawTalk replied 1 year ago.

Good afternoon,

I believe that I have already fully answered your original question. These are not follow up questions you are now asking, but entirely new ones.

As you may not be aware, theRules of Just Answer specify that each customer ask one question in each question thread. For new questions, the customer is asked to open a new question thread. I do sincerely ***** ***** any inconvenience this might cause you.

You may ask for me personally byreferring to me by name (Doug) in your new question and I will be able to assist you. As the questions that you are posting are new, I am required to ask you to please open up a new question thread for them. Thank you for your understanding.

Please keep in mind that, even though you have already paid your deposit money over to JustAnswer, until you rate me highly for my service, I will not be paid for having assisted you with your questions.

I wish you well,

Doug

Customer: replied 1 year ago.

I received a note from just answer that this question was put out for all attorneys to respond.

How the ADR Program works?

Expert:  LawTalk replied 1 year ago.

I wish you well.

Doug

Expert:  LawTalk replied 1 year ago.

a