How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask TexLaw Your Own Question
TexLaw
TexLaw, Attorney
Category: Legal
Satisfied Customers: 4430
Experience:  Lead trial/International commercial attorney licensed 11 yrs
17219180
Type Your Legal Question Here...
TexLaw is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Can I sue my property management company?

This answer was rated:

Can I sue my property management company for not managing my property? There are several issues: first they failed to evict the deadbeat tenant that eventually destroyed my house which is costing me thousands to repair; second, they charged me for repairs but never verified the repairs were done correctly (some were not done at all), when I asked them about it, I was told that if I had an issue, I could take it up with the repair/ service personnel. I asked for the repair/ service personnel contact information and it was not provided; third, there was an accident at the property and the property manager was non-responsive, no one was available to meet with the insurance adjuster- I had to come from out of state to meet the insurance adjuster. It was two weeks after the accident before they visited the property (that was located about three miles from their office) and that was because I became irate. Do I have a case or do I have to just accept the situation??

Hi,
Thank you for your question.
It sounds like you definitely have a case against your property manager for breach of contract and negligence. You will be able to recover as damages the amount of money that was loss as a direct consequence of the property manager's failure to act. So, in this case, the damage that was done by the deadbeat tenant may be partially recovered when you show that the property manager had a duty to inspect the property and make sure it was in a good condition and that the they are responsible for the damage that occurred after the date you show they should have evicted the tenant.
TexLaw and 2 other Legal Specialists are ready to help you

Related Legal Questions