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Dr. B.
Dr. B., Veterinarian
Category: Large Animal Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 19634
Experience:  As a veterinarian, I have been educated to treat all animals, big and small.
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I have a Hereford that is showing signs of bloat. The herd

Customer Question

I have a Hereford bull that is showing signs of bloat. The herd is on hay this fall due to drought situation. Is there anything I can give him to get rid of the bloat?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Large Animal Veterinary
Expert:  Dr. B. replied 1 year ago.

Hello & welcome, I am Dr. B, a licensed veterinarian and I would like to help you today. I do apologize that your question was not answered before. Different experts come online at various times; I just came online, read about your situation, and wanted to help.

First, I would note that we don't usually see bloat associated with adding hay to the ration. Instead, it tends to be lush pasture, legumes, or high levels of concentrates that trigger bloat in cattle. In any case, just to note, if you were using hay with alfalfa, clover or winter wheat, these could be higher risk to feed. So, we'd want to make sure we were using roughage that is a cereal, grain straw, grass hay, or equivalent.

Now in regards ***** ***** bull, if he is showing bloat now, you can try treating with an antifoaming agent just now. Commercial ones (ie Bloat-rid, Tympanyl, No-Bloat,etc) are available or you can use vegetable oils (eg, peanut, soybean, corn, etc ) and mineral oils (paraffins), at doses of 250–500 mL. After dosing, keep him moving to encourage the preparation to mix with the frothy rumen contents. If severe, then he may need a stomach tubed passed to release the gas build up. Or in some cases, your vet may even need to use a trochar to open/deflate the rumen through the body wall.

Otherwise to prevent recurrence for him or further cases, we again want to be offering a high fibre diet (hay or straw & possibly restricting their pasture access if lush) and can use preventative anti-bloating treatment (ie Bloataway preventative bloat drench) for at risk animals.

I hope this information is helpful.

If you need any additional information, do not hesitate to ask!

All the best,

Dr. B.

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