How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask Dan C., DVM Your Own Question
Dan C., DVM
Dan C., DVM, Veterinarian
Category: Large Animal Veterinary
Satisfied Customers: 1174
Experience:  Equine Practitioner. Owner of Mobile Equine/Large Animal Practice for 16 years.
8634083
Type Your Large Animal Veterinary Question Here...
Dan C., DVM is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Our billy goat is around 3 yrs old. Was dignoised with

Customer Question

Our billy goat is around 3 yrs old. Was dignoised with stomach worms by local vet. Said full of eggs in his fecal sample. We last week wormed him with three times the recommended does of safe guard wormer for three days and then recommended to give him 3 cc Ivermectin injected under skin. This was week ago Thursday. He is eating and his bowl movement is not as runny. About pancake consistency. He really does not feel well though really lethargic. I do not see him chewing his cud since this on set. I am very concerned we are not out of the woods yet. Any suggestion on helping him back to health.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Large Animal Veterinary
Expert:  Dan C., DVM replied 1 year ago.

Greetings, and thanks for the question. My apologies for the delay, I just got in for the evening and saw your post.

I'm sorry to hear about Sammy's ongoing parasite problem. What you are describing is, unfortunately, a concern that we are seeing more and more of due to the parasites developing a resistance against many of the common dewormers that have worked so well for years. Unfortunately, "Safegard", which contains the active ingredient Fenbendazole, is one of the least effective these days due to resistance. We are also seeing more and more resistance against Ivermectin, which at one time had full efficacy.

One of the dewormers that has recently worked well for me is a product called "Valbazen", when all others seem to have failed. I would recommend that you consider discussing this change in treatment with your Vet, as another treatment that may help to get rid if the problem entirely.

It is also very important to repeat the treatment ten days after the initial treatment, as the dewormer doesn't kill the eggs, only the adults. Then, as the eggs hatch, the hatchlings are killed before they reach maturity (ten days later) and the ability to lay more eggs.

One other question, however. Did your Vet say what type of eggs were present? Not all dewormers will be effective against all of the types of the internal parasites that are found among goats. One very common goat parasite is a species called "Coccidia" which requires a totally different type of medication.

I do hope that I've been of some help to you, and please let me know if you have any further questions.

All the best to you and Sammy, and I hope he is doing well soon!

Thanks again,

-Dan.

Expert:  Dan C., DVM replied 1 year ago.

Greetings, and thanks for the question. My apologies for the delay, I just got in for the evening and saw your post.

I'm sorry to hear about Sammy's ongoing parasite problem. What you are describing is, unfortunately, a concern that we are seeing more and more of due to the parasites developing a resistance against many of the common dewormers that have worked so well for years. Unfortunately, "Safegard", which contains the active ingredient Fenbendazole, is one of the least effective these days due to resistance. We are also seeing more and more resistance against Ivermectin, which at one time had full efficacy.

One of the dewormers that has recently worked well for me is a product called "Valbazen", when all others seem to have failed. I would recommend that you consider discussing this change in treatment with your Vet, as another treatment that may help to get rid if the problem entirely.

It is also very important to repeat the treatment ten days after the initial treatment, as the dewormer doesn't kill the eggs, only the adults. Then, as the eggs hatch, the hatchlings are killed before they reach maturity (ten days later) and the ability to lay more eggs.

One other question, however. Did your Vet say what type of eggs were present? Not all dewormers will be effective against all of the types of the internal parasites that are found among goats. One very common goat parasite is a species called "Coccidia" which requires a totally different type of medication.

Also, it would be a good idea to have your vet recheck the fecal sample to be sure that progress is (or isn't) being made.

I do hope that I've been of some help to you, and please let me know if you have any further questions.

All the best to you and Sammy, and I hope he is doing well soon!

Thanks again,

-Dan.