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Alex Reese
Alex Reese, Lawyer
Category: Intellectual Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 3424
Experience:  Experienced in intellectual property law
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Hi Alex, thanks for the help with the question about putting

This answer was rated:

Hi Alex, thanks for the help with the question about putting the patent pending number on my mold. I'm looking into applying for another provisional patent for another year. I understand I lose my date, I just don't have the dough to file the utility. I was reading about a "micro entity" discount...do you know anything about that?

Alex Reese :

yes

Alex Reese :

the micro entity qualification is that you make less than 150k annually and also that you have only file 3 prior patents I believe, let me try to confirm that

Alex Reese :

the costs are half for micro vs. small entity I believe, so it is a big savings

Alex Reese :

there is a form that you must fill out and submit to the PTO in order to qualify for it

Alex Reese :

it is actually a max of 4 patent applications (not including provisionals)

Alex Reese :

The folks at Brown & Michaels have provided a concise write-up to help inventors and small companies understand whether they qualify for Micro-Entity-Status and the resulting fee reduction. http://www.bpmlegal.com/howsmall.html


The basic questions are:



  1. Does the applicant qualify as a small entity? (If no, then no micro-entity)

  2. Has the applicant or any joint inventor filed more than four US non-provisional patent applications? (If yes, then no micro-entity, unless those applications were from a prior employment and assigned to the prior employer)

  3. Did the applicant or any listed inventor have an income for the past year that was greater than $150,000? (If yes, then no micro-entity). This number will change annually based upon median US household income.

  4. Have rights in the application been promised or licensed to a non-micro-entity? (If yes, then no micro-entity)


In addition to the Brown & Michaels site above, the next stop for further reading is the USPTO's final rules published in the Federal Register at 77 Fed. Reg. 75019.


The big deal here is that micro-entities receive a 75% reduction in USPTO fees.

Alex Reese :

sorry I have to step away but I will get back to you later if you need more info (just leave your question)

Customer:

Hi Alex - I can't read your reply because the response window for your response is so small. Have you heard similar complaints? Know any fixes?

Alex Reese and other Intellectual Property Law Specialists are ready to help you

Are you able to see my main response above? I am re-posting here:

Alex Reese :

yes

Alex Reese :

the micro entity qualification is that you make less than 150k annually and also that you have only file 3 prior patents I believe, let me try to confirm that

Alex Reese :

the costs are half for micro vs. small entity I believe, so it is a big savings

Alex Reese :

there is a form that you must fill out and submit to the PTO in order to qualify for it

Alex Reese :

it is actually a max of 4 patent applications (not including provisionals)

Alex Reese :

see if this link works (The PTO form): http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&frm=1&source=web&cd=1&ved=0CCsQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.us pto.gov%2Fforms%2Fsb0015a.pdf&ei=78HlUcmENaPeiAL37YGACA&usg=AFQjCNGOaVL7FPachbcgxJN3KqpsatmPXw&sig2=pHiyo65k0G5aHm8bC2x2-g&bvm=bv.49405654,d.cGE

Alex Reese :

The folks at Brown & Michaels have provided a concise write-up to help inventors and small companies understand whether they qualify for Micro-Entity-Status and the resulting fee reduction. http://www.bpmlegal.com/howsmall.html

The basic questions are:


  1. Does the applicant qualify as a small entity? (If no, then no micro-entity)

  2. Has the applicant or any joint inventor filed more than four US non-provisional patent applications? (If yes, then no micro-entity, unless those applications were from a prior employment and assigned to the prior employer)

  3. Did the applicant or any listed inventor have an income for the past year that was greater than $150,000? (If yes, then no micro-entity). This number will change annually based upon median US household income.

  4. Have rights in the application been promised or licensed to a non-micro-entity? (If yes, then no micro-entity)
    In addition to the Brown & Michaels site above, the next stop for further reading is the USPTO's final rules published in the Federal Register at 77 Fed. Reg. 75019.

The big deal here is that micro-entities receive a 75% reduction in USPTO fees.

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