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BizIPEsq., Attorney
Category: Intellectual Property Law
Satisfied Customers: 996
Experience:  I am a tech attorney and I represent clients with technology, internet and intellectual property matters
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I am creating PowerPoint presentations that will be posted on a website and made freely available (no commercial use) to members of my Christian church denomination to show to others. At this point, the presentations contain: 1. about 40 stock photos that I have purchased copyright privileges for on sites like istockphoto.com and shutterstock.com. 2. pictures of historical figures from the twentieth century which are freely available (except I purchased a photo of Albert Einstein because his image is very tightly controlled by a law firm in Los Angeles). 3. old paintings from the 1600s, 1700s and 1800s that I used freely because I do not think they are subject to copyright law. I still have two paintings that were done by contemporary artists, and I need to ask them for permission to use their paintings in my PowerPoint presentation. How do I go about asking permission? Is there a standard form or wording available? Do I need to ask them what kind of attribution they would like to have? Should I suggest attribution wording that will appear in the presentation? Do I need to send them a copy of my entire presentation to see the context in which it will be used? What if I want to use their pictures again in another presentation or context -- can I just get permission right now to use their pictures freely as I choose without having to send a copy of my presentation (I would prefer to not be limited to one presentation)? Thanks, XXXXX XXXXX


BizIPEsq. :

Hello, I will be assisting you

BizIPEsq. :

Here's what you ought to do:

BizIPEsq. :

1) confirm that the license for the 40 stock photos you purchased permits you to post them online as part of your work. 2+3) What's important to understand is that the photographer of the photos holds copyright regardless of the subject matter. So unless the photographs of the historical figures and paintings are out of copyright or have an open license (like creative commons) you need to obtain permission

BizIPEsq. :

Asking for permission is a very time consuming process because there a central clearing house for images does not exist (unlike music). So you will need to track down the photographer of each photo in question and ask the photographers if they own the copyright and then ask for permission. Those that say yes may request attribution or may request to see your power point before hand. I will be up to the photographer

BizIPEsq. :

If you are planning to use the photos again then by all means try to get as wide of a permission as possible.

Customer:

1) I will look at my istockphoto and shutterstock agreements to see if they allow me to post the pictures on my church's website.

Customer:

2) Most of the paintings I used in my draft were from the 1600s. I assume that something of that kind, prior to the 1920s would not be subject to copyright law.

BizIPEsq. :

as noted it's not about the subject matter of the photo it's the photographer. Unless these are your photos in which case you hold the rights or unless the photos themselves are in the public domain you would still need to seek the permission of the photographer

Customer:

3) The two artists I need permission from are painters who are used to selling their work in the form of posters, greeting cards, etc. However, I do not think they will have much experience in making their work available digitally, which is all that I need. For instance, I don't think they will know what to charge. They might not know how to deal with non-commercial digital distribution. Is there a form or common wording I can use to ask permission?

BizIPEsq. :

If I take a photo of an old painting you still have to seek my permission to use the photo regardless of the subject matter

BizIPEsq. :

you can search for "creative commons license" and use that license to be your permission

BizIPEsq. :

this is what you would have the artists approve as the permission

Customer:

Okay, thanks

BizIPEsq. :

you're welcome

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