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ScottyMacESQ
ScottyMacESQ, Lawyer
Category: Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 16152
Experience:  Texas General Practice Attorney
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I am 30 years old man and I met a woman who is 55 now we are

Customer Question

I am 30 years old man and I met a woman who is 55 now we are planning to get marry?is there any problem when I put my documents for green card?we are in relationship from one month.thanks5
Submitted: 6 months ago.
Category: Immigration Law
Customer: replied 6 months ago.
She is US citizen
Expert:  ScottyMacESQ replied 6 months ago.

Thank you for using JustAnswer.

I assume that you're concerned about the 25 year age difference between you two in applying for a green card. There are a number of "red flags" that could come up in a green card application, but will not necessarily stop you from getting a green card:

  • No shared language. If the couple can’t talk to each other, how can they really build a shared life together?
  • Vast difference in age. People of different ages certainly do get married sometimes. But when combined with other red flags, the thinking is that it may represent a compromise by someone who is either interested in obtaining a green card or in being paid to help someone else do so.
  • Difference in religion. Because religious beliefs are fundamental to many people’s approach to life and daily behavior, the U.S. government takes a second look at applications from people of different religions who have married.
  • Different social class or cultural background. People of different wealth levels or place in society often get married, too – but the U.S. government will be curious to know more about how this occurred, and whether it’s for real.
  • Difference in race. You can see a pattern here – any time a couple doesn’t share basic characteristics, it raises questions.
  • Unequal educational background. Studies show that most women don’t believe they could admire a man less educated than they; and that men put intelligence and education at number five on their ranking of desirable qualities in a mate. So if one person in the couple is highly educated and the other not, expect questions.
  • Different addresses. After marriage, most couples live together. If you don’t – particularly if both of you are living in the same country – you will need to provide a good explanation, for example, that one of you is finishing a university degree and the other one can’t leave his or her job. Also be ready to show that you plan to live together as soon as possible.
  • Same house, but no actual interaction. If, for instance, your work and other schedules are set up so that you are never home at the same time, the U.S. government will wonder whether that was intentional.
  • Secret marriage. If you haven’t told your friends and family, USCIS will wonder whether it’s because you don’t want them to get all excited about a marriage that you plan to end as soon as the immigrant gets a green card.
  • All-too-convenient timing of marriage. A goodly number of marriages happen after an undocumented person in the U.S. is caught and placed into removal proceedings, or before someone on a nonimmigrant visa is reaching the date by which he or she must leave the United States. (One can apply for a green card based on marriage as a defense to deportation.) You will have to explain why you didn’t choose to marry until it became a matter of urgency.
  • Attempts to manufacture evidence of shared life right before the interview. You will be asked to provide evidence of joint accounts, assets, memberships, and so on. Those items will likely have dates showing when they were begun. If those dates are mere weeks before the green card or visa interview date, it will create suspicion that you were trying to make your case look good rather than taking natural steps to join your lives.
  • Marriage soon after you met. Most people like to take at least several months to consider getting married. If you got married after only a few meetings or weeks, the government will wonder whether the cause was more romance or, say, money.
  • Marriage soon after a divorce. Again, this would indicate that the “courtship” was suspiciously short. (Or you might have to prove the existence of a long affair!)
  • History of U.S. petitioner sponsoring other spousal immigrants. If the U.S. citizen or permanent resident has married and petitioned for one or more other immigrants in the past, it stands to reason that those marriages ended in divorce. Did that mean a real marriage fell apart – or was the earlier marriage(s) nothing more than a green card scam? And now, since the petitioner didn’t get caught the first time around, is he or she trying it again?
  • Noncitizen comes from a country with a history of immigration fraud. The U.S. government keeps track of which countries’ citizens commit visa or other immigration fraud at high rates. Though it’s not your fault, if the immigrant spouse comes from one of these countries, he or she will face extra scrutiny.
  • No children if woman is of childbearing age. Having children is not a requirement of marriage – but if no children is an added factor in an otherwise questionable case, it won’t help.
  • Impoverished U.S. citizen or resident petitioner. If the U.S. member of the couple lacks a job or apparently needs money, the immigration authorities might wonder whether he or she is looking to make some quick bucks through a fraudulent marriage.
  • History of crimes, fraud, or lies by either spouse. Anyone who has committed past illegal acts may be looked at as more likely or willing to enter into marriage fraud.

Basically these are just things that could lead to future questions. The point is to show that it's love, not simply a vehicle to get a green card. There are actually two red flags here (if not more) in that marriage soon after meeting (you've only been in a relationship for one month) and the age difference. There might be some of these other factors, and the more there are, the less likely a green card will be granted. The relationship needs to be shown to be "bona fide", meaning that it's really love, that you know things about each other that you would know about any spouse, that you live together, that you have intimate knowledge of each other, etc... So while it probably will lead to additional questions, so long as you can answer them to the satisfaction of the immigration officer, that won't be something that prevents you from getting a green card.

Hope that clears things up a bit. If you have any other questions, please let me know. If not, and you have not yet, please rate my answer AND press the "submit" button, if applicable. Please note that I don't get any credit for the time and effort that I spent on this answer unless and until you rate it positively (3 or more stars). Look for the stars on your screen (★★★★★). Thank you, ***** ***** luck to you!

Expert:  ScottyMacESQ replied 6 months ago.

If there's nothing else, please rate this answer. Please note that I don't get any credit for the time and effort that I spent on this answer unless and until you rate it positively (3 or more stars). Look for the stars on your screen (★★★★★). If you feel that I have gone above and beyond in this answer (my average answer is about 10 minutes) bonuses are greatly appreciated. Thank you, ***** ***** luck to you!

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Expert:  ScottyMacESQ replied 6 months ago.

I see that you have not responded in some time. Please note that this question is still open until you rate it. I believe that I have answered your question, but if you have any other questions, please let me know. If not, and you have not yet, please rate my answer AND press the "submit" button, if applicable. Please note that I don't get any credit for the time and effort that I spent on this answer unless and until you rate it positively (3 or more stars). Look for the stars on your screen (★★★★★). Thank you, ***** ***** luck to you!

If you can't see the stars, you may need to scroll up/down/left/right so that you can see them. Again, please note that you have to click the rating and submit it for the question to close out and for me to get credit for the answer I provided.

Expert:  ScottyMacESQ replied 6 months ago.

Hello?

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