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Expert James
Expert James, Immigration Attorney
Category: Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 11671
Experience:  Write FOR JAMES to get my help!
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I am a U.S. citizen and i reside in Georgia. My fiancee lives in Jamaica. We met a year

Customer Question

I am a U.S. citizen and i reside in Georgia. My fiancee lives in Jamaica. We met a year ago and want to get married soon. In terms of getting him over here- Is it faster or better to apply for a fiancee visa or to go to the country get married and file to bring the spouse back to the U.S.?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Immigration Law
Expert:  Expert James replied 1 year ago.
Hello, I am James. I will be helping you today. I do not get a salary here. But just like you, I want to get credit for doing my job. You are the only person who can help me get credit before leaving this site today. So please do not forget to do that by giving me a positive rating with 3 or more stars or any of the smiling faces. Also, if you want me to be your personal immigration Expert, just write “FOR JAMES" at the beginning of any future, new questions, and I will be happy to help you as your personal Expert. QUESTION:I am a U.S. citizen and i reside in Georgia. My fiancee lives in Jamaica. We met a year ago and want to get married soon. In terms of getting him over here- Is it faster or better to apply for a fiancee visa or to go to the country get married and file to bring the spouse back to the U.S.? ANSWER: While it is generally faster to go the route f the K-1 fiancé visa, the difference is usually about 3 months longer if you get married first, and then sponsor him. The benefit of that path - while a little longer - is that he is a permanent resident as soon as he enters the US, as opposed to coming as a fiancé, then getting married and then filing the application for permanent resident status (which itself takes about 6 months to process after it is filed). But to answer your question simply, the fiancé process gets him here sooner than the other process. I know these issues can be confusing. If you want to discuss this or anything else by phone, I can send you an offer for that. There will be an additional fee, if you want to do that. Please let me know and I will send you the offer. I hope I have answered your questions. Kindly rate my customer service with a positive rating. I do not get a salary here and this is the only way I am compensated for my efforts. So please do not forget to do that before you log off. You can do that by giving me 3 or more stars, or any of the smiling faces. And you can continue to ask questions even after you have given a rating. Again, giving me a positive rating is the ONLY way I get credit for helping you. REMINDER: You are not rating the state of the law or the outcome of your situation, which I cannot control. You are rating my customer service. Believe me that I always want to give you good news. But if the outcome is not what you wanted, blame the government and the law, not me. I am only a messenger. Negative ratings are reserved for Professionals who are rude or unprofessional. Giving me a negative rating does not help you get a different answer or outcome. So do not give a negative rating if you need more help, or if I misunderstood your question. Instead click REPLY so I can continue to assist you. A BONUS is appreciated, if you feel I've earned it. If you have questions in the future, write “FOR JAMES" in the question and I will be your personal Expert in this category. Thank you!
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
If I go to Jamaica and marry him- other than the marriage certificate- what do I need to bring back in order to get the sponsorship process started? Also- I hit send and failed to include that he has two children 10 and 23- how would this process work for them?
Customer: replied 1 year ago.
Their mother left Jamaica over 20 years ago and he has been their sole provider
Expert:  Expert James replied 1 year ago.
Kindly remember to give a 3, 4 or 5 star rating before leaving the site today. These most recent two questions are new questions, which usually requires you to post them to a new thread. As a courtesy, I will answer them here; but since I already answered your original question, please do not forget to give a 3, 4 or 5 star rating now. Keep in mind I don't get a salary for working with you; I am only rewarded for doing my job when you give a positive rating. So please do not forget to do that. Thank you! QUESTION: What do I need to bring back in order to get the sponsorship process started? ANSWER: It would be useful to get sworn affidavits from people that you know both and who can attest to the bona fide nature of the relationship. It would also save some time and effort to have him prepare and sign his form G-325A. Otherwise, you will have to have him fill it out and send it to you with an original signature (i.e., by mail). He should provide a recent passport photo, a copy of his birth certificate, a copy of his passport and any divorce decrees or death certificates for any previous spouses. QUESTION: Also- I hit send and failed to include that he has two children 10 and 23- how would this process work for them? ANSWER: You would only be allowed to sponsor the one child who is under the age of 18 by the time you are married. The older child would have to find some other way to come to the US; that could be his father, but only once his father becomes a permanent resident and only when the older child's priority date is current. As of this month, so long as he stays unmarried, that is taking just under 7 years. For the younger child, you file the I-130 petition for him just like his father. Except you only have to show that you are his step-mother (i.e., married to his father). I know these issues can be confusing. If you want to discuss this or anything else by phone, I can send you an offer for that. There will be an additional fee, if you want to do that. Please let me know and I will send you the offer. I hope I have answered your questions. Kindly rate my customer service with a positive rating. I do not get a salary here and this is the only way I am compensated for my efforts. So please do not forget to do that before you log off. You can do that by giving me 3 or more stars, or any of the smiling faces. And you can continue to ask questions even after you have given a rating. Again, giving me a positive rating is the ONLY way I get credit for helping you. REMINDER: You are not rating the state of the law or the outcome of your situation, which I cannot control. You are rating my customer service. Believe me that I always want to give you good news. But if the outcome is not what you wanted, blame the government and the law, not me. I am only a messenger. Negative ratings are reserved for Professionals who are rude or unprofessional. Giving me a negative rating does not help you get a different answer or outcome. So do not give a negative rating if you need more help, or if I misunderstood your question. Instead click REPLY so I can continue to assist you. A BONUS is appreciated, if you feel I've earned it. If you have questions in the future, write “FOR JAMES" in the question and I will be your personal Expert in this category. Thank you!
Expert:  Expert James replied 1 year ago.
Hi again, I received a message that you reviewed my response and have responded. But I cannot see that response above. Please post it again, so I can continue to help you and we can close this question. Thank you!