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Expert James
Expert James, Immigration Attorney
Category: Immigration Law
Satisfied Customers: 11567
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I married my ex-wife when I turned 18. I am 30 y/o now. In

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I married my ex-wife when I turned 18. I am 30 y/o now. In the beginning of our marriage I submitted a petition for her. I remained married for about 6-7 years. Somewhere in the middle and ex-boyfriend of hers turned her in to immigration stating that our marriage wasn't real. We had a child together and shortly thereafter we were called for another interview, at the interview the agent request additional documentation. One of the documents being a paternity test. I was fine with it, but as soon as we left the building she told me that the child wasn't mine. We filed for divorce. Now her case is going before an immigration judge and her and her lawyer are pestering me to be present. I want nothing to do with her. What are my options?

Thank you for using this service. I'll do my best to answer your questions as completely and honestly as I can. All I ask in return is that you give me a positive rating for my customer service. This is the only way I get credit for assisting you. If you feel the need to use "poor service" or "bad service," please ask follow-up questions instead, so that I can try to help you further. Please remember that the law sometimes does not have a satisfactory solution for your issue; unfortunately, this is something I cannot control.

 

I'm sorry to hear of your situation. But the good news is, the solution is very simple: either you go to the hearing or you don't.

You are not required to be at the hearing, nor will you be subpoenaed to the hearing. It is totally up to you whether you go or not. If you want nothing to do with her, then don't go, don't participate and don't aid her at all. That is your right and your option. You are not legally bound to be involved in this in any way.

I hope I have answered your questions. Keep in mind that I only get credit for my work if you rate me positively. If you're satisfied with my answer and my professionalism - not the outcome or the state of the law which I cannot control - please select a top-three rating. Again, if you feel the need to use "poor service" or "bad service," please ask follow-up questions instead, so that I can try to help you further. Remember that the bottom two negative ratings are used for Experts or professionals who are rude and/or bad at their job, and I'm confident you'll find me to be professional and truthful with you.

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If you want me to answer questions in the future, you can write "FOR LONGHORN" at the beginning of your question, or go directly to my question page here: Ask Longhorn Lawyer

Thank you!
Expert James and other Immigration Law Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Now, I'm active duty military and she's been "threatening" to get my command involved so I help her. Is there anything I can do about this? Funny you mention the subpoena, because that was another thing the threatening me with.

Customer: replied 3 years ago.

Lastly, if she is charged with marriage-fraud what would happen to me?

James,

 

QUESTION: Now, I'm active duty military and she's been "threatening" to get my command involved so I help her. Is there anything I can do about this?

 

ANSWER: Unfortunately, this is not an immigration related question, and so I am not permitted to answer this question, I'm afraid.

 

QUESTION: Funny you mention the subpoena, because that was another thing the threatening me with.

 

ANSWER: As far as the subpoena, I have never heard of anyone being subpoenaed for an immigration proceeding. If her attorney is suing this, it's probably a bluff. So call her bluff on it. Wait for the subpoena to appear, instead of taking her word for it. It probably never will show up.

 

Marriage fraud charges usually only are brought against the alien, not you, the sponsor. I would not be too concerned about this, especially considering you are divorced.

 

I hope I have answered your questions. Keep in mind that I only get credit for my work if you rate me positively. If you're satisfied with my answer and my professionalism - not the outcome or the state of the law which I cannot control - please select a top-three rating. Again, if you feel the need to use "poor service" or "bad service," please ask follow-up questions instead, so that I can try to help you further. Remember that the bottom two negative ratings are used for Experts or professionals who are rude and/or bad at their job, and I'm confident you'll find me to be professional and truthful with you.

A bonus is appreciated, if you feel I've earned it.

If you want me to answer questions in the future, you can write "FOR LONGHORN" at the beginning of your question, or go directly to my question page here: Ask Longhorn Lawyer

Thank you!

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