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ASSIGNMENT PAPER a) Comparing Teacher Standards i) Create

Customer Question

ASSIGNMENT PAPER
a) Comparing Teacher Standards
i) Create a chart that compares and contrasts the requirements of NBPTS, those standards specific to your state, CEC, INTASC, and the NCLB Highly Qualified Teacher. Resource 3: State Teacher Standards and Criteria for Certification provides direct links to all state standardsii) APA format is not required, but solid writing skill in APA style and a title page are expected.
b) Weekly Journal
a reflection in an ongoing dialogue journal with should be a minimum of 250-300 words. Please Answer the following question: that are below in the summary
(1) What can the special educator do to continue to develop the skills necessary for effectively teaching students with disabilities?
(2) Where are such opportunities available?
LECTURE BELOW
Students now have a clear idea of professional expectations of special educators by the national and state governments and professional organizations. How can these expectations be met? Most importantly, how can teachers meet the expectations of students with disabilities and their parents? Meeting expectations is the goal of professional development in the Program of Study for the Master of Education in Special Education.
In the Master of Education in Special Education, students have three options for choosing the program of study. The goal is to meet individual needs for achieving standards of professional excellence as a special educator. As professionals, students want to demonstrate the knowledge and skills as defined by national, state, and professional organization standards, and the requirements of the High Quality Teacher of NCLB. To choose the best program of study, first, answer the following question: Are you currently certified as a special education teacher?
Students choosing this program of study must be currently certified in the state in which they want to teach or are currently teaching. Consisting of a minimum of 36 graduate credit hours of courses taken in the sequence in the program of study, this online program is designed for special educators who desire to obtain comprehensive, professional knowledge of students with disabilities and to develop the skills needed for teaching these students effectively. Students must have access to a special education classroom to meet program requirements.
For students not currently certified in special education, there are two options in programs of study for students seeking teacher special education certification. In both of these options, students must remember that only states certify teachers. Universities cannot certify teachers. Grand Canyon University does not certify teachers. Certification in special education is dependent upon individual state requirements. Grand Canyon University cannot accept responsibility for state decisions. It is the student's responsibility to check with the state department of education for details. Students select one or more areas of disability and electives in which they are interested.
The program of study for students seeking institutional recommendation from the Arizona State Board of Education can be found in Module 3. Fully approved by the Arizona State Board of Education for special education teacher certification, this 45-credit-hour graduate program of study may fulfill one of the special education teacher certification requirements of states that have reciprocity agreements with Arizona. Again, it is the student's responsibility to verify the acceptance of this program by an authorized state board of education representative responsible for teacher certification in the student's state. All courses, including student teaching, with one choice of either philosophy or research, are required.
The program of study for students seeking special education teacher certification is based on requirements of their resident states. In this minimum 36-credit-hour graduate program of study, students arrange with an authorized state board of education representative responsible for teacher certification in the state what courses are necessary for teacher certification. Students select areas of disability and electives according to their state requirements. Student teaching may or may not be required. The University recommends but does not require that students submit the following for approval to their state department of education:
•     A copy of the requirements for certification in special education from the student's home state.
•     A copy of the course descriptions related to the program of study.
•     The program of study for a Master of Education in Special Education dependent upon state requirements for certification.
LECTURE CONTINUES
Professionals recognize that they cannot learn alone. They learn through exchange of ideas, communication, dialogue, and feedback. Learning is reciprocal: They learn from each other. Professional relationships form when individuals come together and work cooperatively for a common goal. Through participation on Individualized Education Teams, special educators especially recognize the importance of communication and collaboration, networking, and public relations.
Consequently, the Online Special Education Program demands that students form a personalized and functional Special Education Development (SPED) Team consisting of educators and community members whom the student respects and admires for their understanding and skills in special education. The team members collaborate with students, providing educational opportunities, feedback, and input about special education issues through active involvement in lessons, courses, and programs of study by means of interviews, surveys, or conversations. With the team, students will be completing application assignments in lessons throughout the course of the program of study.
The SPED Team may change from course to course, even lesson to lesson, depending on the topic of study. The team always and necessarily includes a certified special educator, who will serve as a mentor with knowledge and skills of special education at the elementary, middle, or secondary level. The certified special educator will provide opportunities to participate actively in interviewing, assessing, and teaching students with disabilities. The special educator will serve as the SPED Team leader and meet with and assist the student regularly. The leader should become familiar with course requirements and feel free to communicate with the Grand Canyon University course instructor.
In addition, the team may include:
•     A special education administrator or a principal (or assistant principal) with extensive knowledge and skills in special education.
•     A regular educator with knowledge and skills in special education.
•     A parent or guardian of a child with special needs.
•     A student who is representative of the population you will serve.
•     Members from the community with a vested interest in special education: for example, psychologist, social worker, school board member, legislator, special education advocate, or representatives from community organizations.
Students will document team activities in a log to be included in the final course portfolio. In this lesson, students will identify their Special Education Development (SPED) Teams.

CONCLUSION:
According to Kauffman and Hallahan (2005), there continue to be complaints from the public about too many "poorly trained and inexperienced teachers serving students with disabilities" (p. 8). With an understanding of what it means to be a special educator based on standards and law, students in this course have the opportunity to receive "exceptionally good training" (p. 8). Students will create a program of study for the Master of Education in Special Education. With a Special Education Development (SPED) Team, students will journey on a path to achieve the excellence that becomes a gift for the students they will teach.




REFERENCES:
Council for Exceptional Children. (1999). CEC international standards for entry into professional practice. Retrieved January 3, 2006, from
http://education.gsu.edu/scu-gsu/International_Standards/Council%20for%20Exceptional%20Children_files/ps-entry.html
Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium, INTASC Special Education Sub-Committee. (2001). Model standards for licensing general and special education teachers of students with disabilities: A resource for state dialogue. Retrieved September 29, 2004, from http://www.ccsso.org/content/pdfs/SpedStds.pdf
Jones, J. M. (2004). Satisfaction with K-12 education shows increase over last year: Now at highest level since 1999. Retrieved September 29, 2004, from http://www.gallup.com/poll/content/login.aspx?ci=12817
Kauffman, J. M., & Hallahan, D. P. (2005). Special education: What it is and why we need it. New York: Allyn & Bacon.
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. (2001). NBPTS exceptional needs standards for teachers of students from birth – 21+. Retrieved September 26, 2004, from http://www.nbpts.org/pdf/ex_needs.pdf
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Homework
Expert:  Jane T (LLC) replied 5 years ago.

Dear 7/8,

 

What state should I use for the standards (same you have provided me before)?

 

I know NCLB, can you provide CEC, INTASC links?

 

 

Customer: replied 5 years ago.
yes, and the national standards thanks seven
Customer: replied 5 years ago.
This is Special Education the CEC standards and yes, and the national standards thanks seven
Expert:  Jane T (LLC) replied 5 years ago.

Hi,

 

I have AZ and National standards from original, but I do not know where to find CEC or INTASC - can you send those to me?

 

 

Customer: replied 5 years ago.

HERE ARE THE 8 (INTASC) Standards AND BELOW ARE THE TEN CEC

 

 

 

 

(Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) Standards

 

Standard 1, Subject Matter.

1.21 The teacher realizes that subject matter knowledge is not a fixed body of facts but is complex and ever-evolving. S/he seeks to keep abreast of new ideas and understandings in the field.

 

Standard 2, Student Learning.

2.21 The teacher appreciates individual variation within each area of development, shows respect for the diverse talents of all learners, and is committed to help them develop self confidence and competence.

2.22 The teacher is disposed to use students' strengths as a basis for growth, and their errors as an opportunity for learning.

 

Standard 3, Diverse Learners.

3.21 The teacher believes that all children can learn at high levels and persists in helping all children achieve success.

3.22 The teacher appreciates and values human diversity, shows respect for students' varied talents and perspectives, and is committed to the pursuit of "individually configured excellence."

3.23 The teacher respects students as individuals with differing personal and family backgrounds and various skills, talents, and interests.

3.24 The teacher is sensitive to community and cultural norms.

3.25 The teacher makes students feel valued for the potential as people, and helps them learn to value each other.

 

Standard 8, Assessment.

8.21 The teacher values ongoing assessment as essential to the instructional process and recognizes that many different assessment strategies, accurately and systematically used, are necessary for monitoring and promoting student learning.

8.22 The teacher is committed to using assessment to identify student strengths and promote student growth rather than to deny students access to learning opportunities

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION ON CEC STANDARDS THERE ARE 10

Teaching Standards

Pedagogy or teaching skill is at the heart of

special education. Special educators have

always recognized that the individualized

learning needs of children are at the center of

instruction. The CEC preparation standards

are developed around ten standards that

describe the minimum knowledge, skills, and

dispositions shared by all special educators.

While these standards are identical across special

education specialty areas, distinct sets of

individuals

with exceptional needs both

and society. Special educators understand

these influence professional practice,

assessment, instructional planning, implementation,

and program evaluation.

educators understand how issues

diversity can impact families, cultures,

schools, and how these complex human

can interact with issues in the delivery special

education services. They understand

relationships of organizations of special education

to the organizations and

schools, school systems, and other

Special educators use this knowledge

ground upon which to construct

personal understandings and philosophies

special education.

 

validated knowledge and skills inform and

differentiate the respective specialty areas and

provide minimum knowledge and skills that

special educators must master for safe and

effective practice. Each of the knowledge and

skill sets is located in Section 4.

Standard #1: Foundations

Special educators understand the field as an

evolving and changing discipline based on

philosophies, evidence-based principles and

theories, relevant laws and policies, diverse

and historical points of view, and human

issues that have historically influenced and

continue to influence the field of special education

and the education and treatment of individuals

with exceptional needs both in school

and society. Special educators understand how

these influence professional practice, including

assessment, instructional planning, implementation,

and program evaluation. Special

educators understand how issues of human

diversity can impact families, cultures, and

schools, and how these complex human issues

can interact with issues in the delivery of special

education services. They understand the

relationships of organizations of special education

to the organizations and functions of

schools, school systems, and other agencies.

Special educators use this knowledge as a

ground upon which to construct their own

personal understandings and philosophies of

special education.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Standard #2: Development and

Characteristics of Learners

Special educators know and demonstrate

respect for their students first as unique

human beings. Special educators understand

the similarities and differences in human

development and the characteristics between

and among individuals with and without

exceptional learning needs. Moreover, special

educators understand how exceptional conditions

can interact with the domains of human

development and they use this knowledge to

respond to the varying abilities and behaviors

of individuals with exceptional learning needs.

Special educators understand how the experiences

of individuals with exceptional learning

needs can impact families, as well as the individual's

ability to learn, interact socially, and

live as fulfilled contributing members of the

community.

Standard #3: Individual Learning

Differences

Special educators understand the effects that

an exceptional condition can have on an individual's

learning in school and throughout life.

Special educators understand that the beliefs,

traditions, and values across and within cultures

can affect relationships among and

between students, their families, and the

school community. Moreover, special educators

are active and resourceful in seeking to

understand how primary language, culture,

and familial backgrounds interact with the

individual's exceptional condition to impact

the individual's academic and social abilities,

attitudes, values, interests, and career options.

The understanding of these learning differences

and their possible interactions provides

the foundation upon which special educators

individualize instruction to provide meaningful

and challenging learning for individuals

with exceptional learning needs.

Standard #4: Instructional Strategies

Special educators possess a repertoire of

evidence-based instructional strategies to individualize

instruction for individuals with

exceptional learning needs. Special educators

select, adapt, and use these instructional strategies

to promote positive learning results in

general and special curricula and to appropriately

modify learning environments for individuals

with exceptional learning needs. They

enhance the learning of critical thinking, problem-

solving, and performance skills of individuals

with exceptional learning needs, and

increase their self-awareness, self-management,

self-control, self-reliance, and selfesteem.

Moreover, special educators emphasize

the development, maintenance, and generalization

of knowledge and skills across environments,

settings, and the lifespan.

Standard #5: Learning Environments

and Social Interactions

Special educators actively create learning environments

for individuals with exceptional

learning needs that foster cultural understanding,

safety and emotional well-being, positive

social interactions, and active engagement of

individuals with exceptional learning needs. In

addition, special educators foster environments

in which diversity is valued and individuals

are taught to live harmoniously and

productively in a culturally diverse world.

Special educators shape environments to

encourage the independence, self-motivation,

self-direction, personal empowerment, and

self-advocacy of individuals with exceptional

learning needs. Special educators help their

general education colleagues integrate individuals

 

with exceptional learning needs in general

education environments and engage them in

meaningful learning activities and interactions.

Special educators use direct motivational

and instructional interventions with

individuals with exceptional learning needs to

teach them to respond effectively to current

expectations. When necessary, special educators

can safely intervene with individuals with

exceptional learning needs in crisis. Special

educators coordinate all these efforts and provide

guidance and direction to paraeducators

and others, such as classroom volunteers and

tutors.

 

Standard #6: Language

Special educators understand typical and

atypical language development and the ways

in which exceptional conditions can interact

with an individual's experience with and use

of language. Special educators use individualized

strategies to enhance language development

and teach communication skills to

individuals with exceptional learning needs.

Special educators are familiar with augmentative,

alternative, and assistive technologies to

support and enhance communication of individuals

with exceptional needs. Special educators

match their communication methods to an

individual's language proficiency and cultural

and linguistic differences. Special educators

provide effective language models and they

use communication strategies and resources to

facilitate understanding of subject matter for

individuals with exceptional learning needs

whose primary language is not English.

Standard #7: Instructional Planning

Individualized decision making and instruction

is at the center of special education practice.

Special educators develop long-range

individualized instructional plans anchored in

both general and special curricula. In addition,

special educators systematically translate these

individualized plans into carefully selected

shorter-range goals and objectives taking into

consideration an individual's abilities and

needs, the learning environment, and a myriad

of cultural and linguistic factors. Individualized

instructional plans emphasize explicit

modeling and efficient guided practice to

assure acquisition and fluency through maintenance

and generalization. Understanding of

these factors as well as the implications of an

individual's exceptional condition, guides the

special educator's selection, adaptation, and

creation of materials, and the use of powerful

instructional variables. Instructional plans are

modified based on ongoing analysis of the

individual's learning progress. Moreover, special

educators facilitate this instructional planning

in a collaborative context including the

individuals with exceptionalities, families,

professional colleagues, and personnel from

other agencies as appropriate. Special educators

also develop a variety of individualized

transition plans, such as transitions from preschool

to elementary school and from secondary

settings to a variety of postsecondary work

and learning contexts. Special educators are

comfortable using appropriate technologies to

support instructional planning and individualized

instruction.

Standard #8: Assessment

Assessment is integral to the decision making

and teaching of special educators, and special

educators use multiple types of assessment

information for a variety of educational decisions.

Special educators use the results of

assessments to help identify exceptional learning

needs and to develop and implement individualized

instructional programs, as well as

to adjust instruction in response to ongoing

learning progress. Special educators understand

the legal policies and ethical principles

of measurement and assessment related to

referral, eligibility, program planning, instruction,

and placement for individuals with

exceptional learning needs, including those

from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

Special educators understand measurement

theory and practices for addressing

issues of validity, reliability, norms, bias, and

interpretation of assessment results. In addition,

special educators understand the appropriate

use and limitations of various types of

assessments. Special educators collaborate

with families and other colleagues to assure

nonbiased, meaningful assessments and decision-

making. Special educators conduct formal

and informal assessments of behavior, learning,

achievement, and environments to design

learning experiences that support the growth

and development of individuals with exceptional

learning needs. Special educators use

assessment information to identify supports

and adaptations required for individuals with

exceptional learning needs to access the general

curriculum and to participate in school, system,

and statewide assessment programs.

Special educators regularly monitor the

progress of individuals with exceptional learn-

ing needs in general and special curricula.

Special educators use appropriate technologies

to support their assessments.

Standard #9: Professional and

Ethical Practice

Special educators are guided by the profession's

ethical and professional practice standards.

Special educators practice in multiple

roles and complex situations across wide age

and developmental ranges. Their practice

requires ongoing attention to legal matters

along with serious professional and ethical

considerations. Special educators engage in

professional activities and participate in learning

communities that benefit individuals with

exceptional learning needs, their families, colleagues,

and their own professional growth.

Special educators view themselves as lifelong

learners and regularly reflect on and adjust

their practice. Special educators are aware of

how their own and others' attitudes, behaviors,

and ways of communicating can influence

their practice. Special educators understand

that culture and language can interact with

exceptionalities, and are sensitive to the many

aspects of diversity of individuals with exceptional

learning needs and their families.

Special educators actively plan and engage in

activities that foster their professional growth

and keep them current with evidence-based

best practices. Special educators know their

own limits of practice and practice within

them.

Standard #10: Collaboration

Special educators routinely and effectively collaborate

with families, other educators, related

service providers, and personnel from community

agencies in culturally responsive ways.

This collaboration assures that the needs of

individuals with exceptional learning needs

are addressed throughout schooling. Moreover,

special educators embrace their special

role as advocate for individuals with exceptional

learning needs. Special educators promote

and advocate the learning and well-being

of individuals with exceptional learning needs

across a wide range of settings and a range of

different learning experiences. Special educators

are viewed as specialists by a myriad of

people who actively seek their collaboration to

effectively include and teach individuals with

exceptional learning needs. Special educators

are a resource to their colleagues in understanding

the laws and policies relevant to individuals

with exceptional learning needs.

Special educators use collaboration to facilitate

the successful transitions of individuals with

exceptional learning needs across settings and

services.

Core Academic Subject Matter Content

CEC expects all special educators to have a

solid grounding in the liberal arts curriculum

ensuring proficiency in reading, written and

oral communications, calculating, problem

solving, and thinking. All special educators

should also possess a solid base of understanding

of the general content area curricula,

that is, math, reading, English/language arts,

science, social studies, and the arts, sufficient

to collaborate with general educators in

  • Teaching or co-teaching academic subject

matter content of the general curriculum to

students with exceptional learning needs

across a wide range of performance levels.

  • Designing appropriate learning and performance

accommodations and modifications

for students with exceptional

learning needs in academic subject matter

content of the general curriculum.

Because of the significant role that content

specific subject matter knowledge plays at the

secondary level, special education teachers

routinely teach secondary level academic subject

matter content classes in consultation or

collaboration with one or more general education

teachers appropriately licensed in the

respective content area. However, when a

special education teacher assumes sole responsibility

for teaching a core academic subject

matter class at the secondary level, the special

educator must have a solid knowledge base in

the subject matter content sufficient to assure

the students can meet state curriculum standards.

 

 

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