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Brian
Brian, Architect
Category: Home Improvement
Satisfied Customers: 2153
Experience:  Licensed Architect- 17 years, L.E.E.D. AP
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Trying to cut firewood. I have a small, 16-inch chain saw,

Customer Question

Trying to cut firewood. I have a small, 16-inch chain saw, new, for lightweight household duty. I have some really big rounds to cut into logs. They're seasoned oak. Some of the rounds are as big as 24 inches across, and some of the logs are still like
30-inches long. Can you give me a series of logical cuts to attack pieces like this safely with a smaller chain saw. It's a good, new saw, just smaller...
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Home Improvement
Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

First make sure the logs are properly supported.

Cutting 30 inch pieces can be ackward .

Next make sure your chain is sharp and well oiled .

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

If you are going to be doing this a lot it might

Be worthwhile to build a saw table for cutting the logs.

Or To keep it simple a few boards or large limbs properly

Placed on the ground can also work .

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

The log should be placed in a manner where it is equally

supported on each side of the cut.

It is also best if you can move to either side of the cut.

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

The first cut should be made from the top of the log.

Do not try to plunge into the log with the end of the blade.'

Keep your cut wide by cutting shallow and then repeating the same cut.

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

When the entire blade starts to disapear into

The log bring it back out and rotate the log. Cut until the blade disapears again. Rotating the log and changing sides ad needed.

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

Remember to keep the log elevated and supported so when the cut is completed the chain will not hit the table top or ground and neither piece will fall . Renember keep the cut wide. The area where the two pieces will be separated should only be a few inches wide .

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

With a 16 inch chain there will be times toward the end of the cut when the entire blade will dissapear into the log . By keeping the cut straight and wide and rotating the log with both ends equally supported close to the cut and at the ends this will not be a problem.

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

This link has a pretty decent saw table . He uses his for woodworking rather than fire wood .

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

On this link the logs are shown being split end to end using the saw and then cut into shorter pieces .

This is an alternate technique you can try. Do it slow and easy .

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

This link shows a sawhorse type setup with the end of the log sticking out and cuts being made more like banna slices rather than trying to cut the log into two near equsl pieces.

The slices just fall to the ground as they are cut and can later be easily split into "chunks" . This is a good method for small woodstoves.

Expert:  Machinc replied 1 year ago.

I will be glad to answer any questions you may have.

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