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Rick
Rick, General Contractor
Category: Home Improvement
Satisfied Customers: 21175
Experience:  Licensed construction supervisor with 35+ yrs. experience.
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I am trying to figure out how to cost effectively fix the

Customer Question

I am trying to figure out how to cost effectively fix the insulation/condensation in my attic. It is cape-cod style house with a finished upstairs bedroom with knee walls. On the west side of the room, when temps are around 30-45 degrees, I get condensation that is visible in some of my drywall seams, mostly in the closet.
The house does not have any eaves or eave vents. No gable or ridge vents either.
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Home Improvement
Expert:  Rick replied 1 year ago.

Welcome to Just Answer, my name is ***** ***** I will do my best to help you with your issue. If my initial response doesn’t answer your question then let me know and we can continue our conversation.

This is usually an indication of a gap in the insulation above the area with the condensation. This is not a soffit/ridge venting issue. So you need to locate the space above the area with condensation and add more insualtion

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
the roof addition that isn't insulated and is opening into the insulated roof doesn't need to be insulated? The roof that is insulated is filled with insulation from the bottom of the roof deck to the drywall, from the knew wall up.
Expert:  Rick replied 1 year ago.

I'm not following your latest description. You need to insulate above the area with the condensation. I don't know what you mean by the roof addition. Insulation is only used next to/above heated/conditioned spaces. You don't insulate between the rafters of an unheated space. If this space is below enclosed rafters then blowing in insulation is probably your best bet

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
I guess I think that the roof addition should be insulated since it is open to the insulated in several places and it would help with heating/cooling of the space, but I want to confirm that is correct and whether or not 6mil plastic is needed for vapor barrier. Below the addition is the kitchen.I attached some pictures.
DSCF9614.jpg is a view from the opening from the old roof that is cut out and insulated to the addition that is not insulated.
DSCF9615 jpg.jpg is a view from the opening from the old roof that is cut out and insulated to the addition that is not insulated.
DSCF916.jpg is a view of the addition from inside
DSCF917.jpg is a view from in the addition to the outside of the old roof. this is where the majority of the condensation occurs.
DSCF9620.jpg is a view from in the addition to the outside of the old roof. this is where the majority of the condensation occurs.
DSCF9621 jpg.jpg is a view between the knee wall and the insulated roof, there are large openings to the insulated roof here.
house street view.jpg is a street view image showing the roofs.
Expert:  Rick replied 1 year ago.

I'm afraid your pics don't really help. Like I said before you need to insulate the walls or ceiling of a heated space that is adjacent to an unheated space. I would not insulate between the rafters in any of the pics you showed from what I can see in the pics. A vapor barrier should always be used but only up against the backside (from the perspective of the heated space) of the wall board or lathes where you insulate. Never on top of existing insulation.

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