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Dovetail Greene
Dovetail Greene , General Contractor
Category: Home Improvement
Satisfied Customers: 373
Experience:  Licensed Building Contractor & Certified Building Designer
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What is the cheapest and easiest way to cover old, old, tile

Resolved Question:

What is the cheapest and easiest way to cover old, old, tile flooring?

We moved into an inlaws house the tile floor in the kitchen is gross and missing in places. Pieces keep chipping off and I sweep it up. Almost half of the floor is just the wood that was under the tiles. My inlaw is supposed to be fixing the house up but I need a thrifty solution till he gets around to it.

I really, really, would like something I can throw on the floor without having to remove the old tiles just for a temp solution? Carpet (like area rugs) sound silly in a kitchen with kids in the house. I watched them redo tile upstairs and it took forever to heat up the glue underneath and get the old floor off. I don't have that kind of time and would rather wait until it's actually being remodeled.

I don't know anything about the different kinds of flooring, but anything you can suggest is very much appreciated. My searches turn up things like "floating floors."
Submitted: 4 years ago.
Category: Home Improvement
Expert:  Dovetail Greene replied 4 years ago.

Dovetail Greene :

Good evening. My name's Kel. Your least expensive solution is to scrape off the old tile. I talking about using an industrial strength scraper. The handle is over five feet long and weighted. After that some 1/4" underlayment. After that some sheet vinyl. If this is a DIY project then I'd use stick and press tiles. Materials would be around 300$. If you have scraping, underlayment and sheet vinyl done by a professional you're around 850$. It sounds like the existing underlayment is in pretty ragged shape. Nothing will stick to it. Hence the need for underlayment over everything How does this all sound?

Dovetail Greene :

Floating floors are going to be much more expensive.

Customer:

Is sheet vinyl like laminate, and available at Home Depot or such?

Customer:

As well as the industrial strength scraper, can I find that at a store or would I have to rent it? You're right about the underlayment. It's...rough! $300 is more then I would like to spend, but in the end would the vinyl last a good while? Sorry for the extra questions, I am entirely out of my element on this.

Customer:

Sorry I understand about the peel and stick tiles, they used a long sheet of laminate for another room because they said it was pretty darn cheap

Dovetail Greene :

No problem with the 'extra' questions. We go until they're all answered. Inexpensive laminate is a decorative plastic adhered to a solid base. The pieces are usually 12" x 36". But they're quite tricky to install in a space like a kitchen. A very advanced project for DIY. The sheet vinyl I'm talking about is usually 6' wide and comes in long rolls. It's the least expensive material, but requires advanced skills to install correctly. Even inexpensive vinyl will last ten years. You can get an industrial strenght scraper at a big box store, but I'd rent one if this is the only space you have to do. I recommended press and stick tiles because they're easy to work with. If you want go to YouTube and see if you can find one on installing sheet vinyl. See if that's something you want to try. It doesn't have to be a perfect fit. You can use pre-finished trim to complete the joint betwween the edge of the vinyl and the wall. What do you think?

Customer:

I think as inexperienced as I am I should probably go with the peel and stick! Should I buy extra in case of my large glass door? My mother threw down peel and sticks about a year ago and the tiles infront of her large glass deck door are already discolored from the rest. Can I yank em out and replace or should I just protect them with a rug or something?

Customer:

(the discolor is from the sun beating down on it it seems)

Customer:

After that I'm done, you've been extremely helpful, and I thank you very much!

Dovetail Greene :

Buy the extra case. If your kitchen gets direct sun try to select a simple pattern in a light color. Any fading won't be as obvious. Peel and stick are easier to remove than tile installed with mastic.

Customer:

Ok, thank you!

Dovetail Greene and 3 other Home Improvement Specialists are ready to help you
Expert:  Dovetail Greene replied 4 years ago.
Hello again. Just checking in to see how the tiling in the kitchen turned out.