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Marty
Marty, professional remodeler
Category: Home Improvement
Satisfied Customers: 122
Experience:  30 years of home remodeling
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Bungalow Covered Stoop Redesign

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My front stoop needs a redesign. It has wrought iron pillars on concrete blocks, a flat roof. I want a pediment and round columns to dress it up, but need to keep within the overall modest look of this small 40s bungalow. The house has a low, sloping roof. Photo available. How do I determine the best fit for column diameter and pediment slope with the house?
A photo would be helpful, and probably needed to ensure an
accurate response.
Also, a budget amount would be helpful, so that it is not "over-
designed"
You can post the picture here on your page.
I will reply after I have looked at the photo(s) and come up with
an idea
Sincerely,... Martye
 

 

I have recieved your photos and am currently working on the design.... Please be patient! (Good things come to those that wait!)


Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Thanks. Looking forward to it!
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
How long do you think your idea will take -- I know it can be difficult to discern in advance how long something will take -- I am a bit anxious and very curious.
Customer: replied 11 years ago.
 
 

A couple of days(as I have to work my REAL job as well!)

Quick idea: nice pedimement, 2 columns, open, 'airy', sort of "mission"
look. It looks like this this would fit with the wrought iron 
look already involved.

Please re-post your pictures to THIS site so that you can can get more 'input' from our other specialists

                   &nbs p;                   &nbs p;                   &nbs p;
Sincerely,

                   &nbs p;                   &nbs p;                   &nbs p;          
Martye

 






 

Will you be doing this work yourself or hiring a contractor?


Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Marty's Post:  A contractor has been hired.  If your next question involves why not get him to design something, the answer is 'he is.'  I want more than just his from which to choose.  Your idea sounds good.  The house photo has been posted.  


Thank-you for your patience!!

No, the reason I asked about a contractor was so I knew how much detail
to include. A picture and a few specifications should be enough for
your contractor to be able to build and site design the porch.

Instead of round columns, I would suggest a tapered column about 7-8"
at the bottom and 4-6" at the top on all four sides(without knowing the
exact dimensions of the existing porch, it's hard to give an exact,
because I can't scale it out)

The roof would be an open 2 x 6 (2 x 4 if code allows) rafter supported by an underlaying 2 x 6 ridge support

The outer ends would be supported by a 4 x 4 resting on the columns.

I would suggest the roof decking be 1 x 6 sheathing(exposed below) covered with a shingle that matches your existing roof

The ends of the rafters would be open(no fascia).

The paneling on the front of your house would extend up to the new roof line.

The picture doesn't show it well, but the front of the roof is open,
back to the house(in the picture, it looks like the paneling is in
front,but it's the best rendering I can do)

I thank you again for your "challenge" and your patience!



 


 



 













 

Sorry, wrong picture.

Here is the proposed look



 




Customer: replied 11 years ago.
Reply to Marty's Post:

 Questions:  Why no facia on the front?  No facia on sides, too, right?  How does having facia in the front of the stoop affect the look?


Also I happened by a modest house with a similar stoop and they had put a half-round, flat top over it with tapered columns [when I said round, I meant tapered].  If I use this approach, it may give a more consistent look with the inside of the house, which has curved archways and coved ceiling-wall joints.  Can you comment on this idea? 


On your idea, did you mimic the slope of the existing gable?  What measurement did you use?  How did you arrive at it?


When you say 8" column, do you mean diameter?  When you say '4 columns' does that mean 2 are flush with the wall of the house, or would they be half-rounds?


Thanks,

Customer: replied 11 years ago.
 The stoop is 6 1/2' x 4'
 

1) Why no fascia on the front?

 The last (front) 2x4(6) will be the fascia. the roof shoul over hang the last rafter by 8 to 12 ".

2) The inside of the house has no bearing on the exterior, unless you
are looking to carry a "theme" throughout. People can not see the the
inside of your house from outside. From the outside, I believe you
should keep a simple look and not introduce a conflicting design
element(arches), which tend to represent a more 'modern' look.Not
seeing the other houses in your neighborhood,however, puts me at a
disadvantage,design-wise.

3) The height of the gable would be the same as the height of your
existing roof peak, it 'flows' better and is more aesthetically
appearing. It (the gable peak) would tie into your existing roof
line(your contractor would have final say on this)

4) The column I propose would be ~8" WIDE at its base and taper to 4-5" at its' top. It is a tapered column on all four sides.

Again, without precise measurements, I am giving by best 'guess' as to
what these would be based on what I interpret from your picture.

5) There would only be TWO columns, right and left, in the front to support the roof.

6)(not asked) The ends would look the same as the front of your roof, with the 2 x 4(6) exposed,as in your picture.

Please return if you have more questions!



 











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