How JustAnswer Works:

  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.

Ask Buddy Your Own Question

Buddy
Buddy, Technician
Category: Heavy Equipment
Satisfied Customers: 730
Experience:  20 years experience. Freightliner tech for last 14 years
19040450
Type Your Heavy Equipment Question Here...
Buddy is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

We have a Freightliner Columbia 2004 with a Detroit series

Resolved Question:

We have a Freightliner Columbia 2004 with a Detroit series 60 engine. As we are driving 55mph - 65mph the turbo will shut itself off. if we leave the foot on the gas the check engine light will come on, if we take the foot of the gas the engine will downshift and the turbo will reengage. This is a intermittent problem, the shop cant diagnose. The shops computer says there is no problem but still the problem reoccurs.
Submitted: 5 years ago.
Category: Heavy Equipment
Expert:  Buddy replied 5 years ago.
Hi there lvhino. I am Buddy. I will try and help you out. Looks like from year model you have a egr engine. That is a common complaint on those. What is your engine serial # ? And what was codes it was coding?
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

engine/model/serk 6067MK6E 06R0727582

Freightliner tells me its not leaving any codes. First time it went in it was also whistling and they replaced the gaskets to the exhaust manifold. Their computer does not find any other codes for the loss of power (turbo stopping) eventhrough we have gone back twice after the turbo stopped on two consecutive days.

Customer: replied 5 years ago.

engine/model/serk 6067MK6E 06R0727582

Freightliner tells me its not leaving any codes. First time it went in it was also whistling and they replaced the gaskets to the exhaust manifold. Their computer does not find any other codes for the loss of power (turbo stopping) eventhrough we have gone back twice after the turbo stopped on two consecutive days.

 

correction on the model: 2004 Freightliner CL120

Expert:  Buddy replied 5 years ago.
Hi there again. Intermediate problems with these egr engines can be a pain. Way you are describing , sounds like it could be a couple different things. Could be the vpod that controls the vnt vanes in the turbo. Could be the vnt vanes in the turbo sticking . Could be leaking air from vpod to turbo. Low air pressure to Vpod. Also could be turbo boost sensor malfunctioning. All of the problems usually leave a code tho. The only way to check out put pressure and travel of vnt rod at the turbo , is to have a laptop with diagnostic link. You would activate and check for air leaks and check travel. I sometimes also remove the clip at the arm of the actuator rod on the turbo. I then check to see if i can move the vanes in the turbo with the lever that was just disconnected. Biggest problem i see on this type of symptom is the vpod.Hope this helps you out. If you have anymore questions. Just ask. Thanks
Customer: replied 5 years ago.

We had a new turbo installed by Freightliner 9-25-2008. Are these parts Vpod, turbo boost sensor, vnt vanes, in the turbo or connected to the turbo. I want to know this so when I go back to Freighliner tomorrow I can check on the warranty of the Turbo.

Thanks

Expert:  Buddy replied 5 years ago.
Hi there again.The vpod is at right side rear of block . It is what controls the vanes in the turbo. The vnt vanes are inside the turbo. You can not view them. The boost sensor is on the intake manifold. If you are going back tomorrow i would get them to do egr check list. Here is troubleshooting for.

The following pages identify a logical troubleshooting flow for specific operational concerns. The complaints and diagnostics are based on conditions identified by the DDC Customer Support Center at(NNN) NNN-NNNN Information in this publication is accurate as of March 2004.?

Note: Prior to performing any DDEC IV troubleshooting or testing procedures, please ensure that the engine's EGR system has been modified. Please refer to:

  • Service Information Letter 04 TS-32. For detailed information, please visit the Detroit Diesel Technical Service Letter Web Page at http://192.135.85.10/cust/sletr/revised_2004.asp and browse for Technical Service Letter "04 TS-32".
  • Service Information Letter 04 TS-62. For detailed information, please visit the Detroit Diesel Technical Service Letter Web Page at http://192.135.85.10/cust/sletr/revised_2004.asp and browse for Technical Service Letter "04 TS-62".

Note: You may also access these TS letters after logging into the DDC Extranet by clicking on Support, On-highway, Service Information, Service Information Letters, 2004-to-2006

Troubleshooting Task?

Testing Procedures are:?

  • Test A
  • Test B
  • Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Basic Checks
  • Poor performance, high exhaust temperatures, high soot levels, SID 147 codes, and black exhaust smoke checks. For detailed information, please visit the Detroit Diesel Technical Service Letter Web Page at http://192.135.85.10/cust/sletr/revised_2004.asp and browse for Technical Service Letter 05 TS-01.

?

Intermittent Black Smoke

Perform the following steps for Intermittent Black Smoke .?

  1. Check for Flash Codes. If Flash Codes were logged, diagnose the logged codes first.
  2. Visually inspect the air filter for restrictions. If the air filter is clogged or dirty, replace the air filter.
  3. Visually inspect the air inlet hoses for soft or collapsed areas. If the air inlet hoses are damaged, replace as necessary.
  4. Visually inspect the air inlet for restrictions. If the air inlet has restrictions, clean as necessary.
  5. Perform "Test A" in the "Testing Procedure" section.
  6. Perform the checks in the "Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Basic Checks" section. Refer to the "Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Basic Checks for Series 60 Engines" section of the DDDEC III/IV Single ECM Troubleshooting Guide, (6SE497).
  7. Test drive the vehicle with DDDL and perform a snapshot. Analyze the snapshot.
  8. Perform "Test B" in the "Testing Procedure" section.

Power Loss Under Heavy Pull

With power loss under heavy pull and in extreme cold ambient conditions, the engine will operate in Condensation Protection . During this mode of operation, the engine boost will be reduced and there is no reduction of power. Operating in this mode is a normal operating condition and will not affect engine life or performance.?

Note: Trucks operating with winter fronts will experience this condition less often. DDC's recommendations have not changed regarding winter front usage.

Perform the following steps for Power Loss Under Heavy Pull .?

  1. Check for diagnostic trouble codes. If Fault Codes are logged, diagnose the logged codes first.
  2. Visually inspect the air filter restrictions. If the air filter is clogged or dirty, replace the air filter.
  3. Visually inspect the air inlet hoses for soft or collapsed areas. If the air inlet hoses are damaged, replace as necessary.
  4. Visually inspect the air inlet for restrictions. If the air inlet has restrictions, clean as necessary.
  5. Visually inspect the entire length of the breather tube for kinks. If the breather tube has kinks, repair as necessary.
  6. Measure the fuel pressure under heavy loads.
    1. If the fuel pressure was spiking or decreasing, perform step 7 .
    2. If the fuel pressure was not spiking or decreasing, testing is complete.
  7. Remove the fuel pump.
    1. If the fuel pump is damaged, replace the fuel pump.
    2. If the fuel pump is not damaged, perform step 8 .
  8. Remove the fuel injectors and inspect for combustion passing the seat.
    1. If seats are damaged, replace as necessary.

      Note: The fuel injector may need to be replaced also.

    2. If the seats are not damaged, testing is complete.

Low Boost Under Cold Ambient Conditions

In extreme cold ambient conditions, the engine will operate in Condensation Protection . During this mode of operation, the engine boost will be reduced and there is no reduction of power. Operating in this mode is a normal operating condition and will not affect engine life or performance.?

Note: Trucks operating with winter fronts will experience this condition less often. DDC's recommendations have not changed regarding winter front usage.

For low boost under cold ambient conditions, clear fault codes and return the engine to service ?

Flash Codes 14 and 29

Perform the following steps for codes indicating a derate condition, Flash Codes 14 (PID 110/FMI14 and Flash Code 29 (PID 404/FMI 14).?

  1. Determine if derate is typical operation (refer to Appendix "10.4.7 Service Information Letters" , Service Information Letter 03 TS-23).

    Note: During Typical engine operating conditions, the engine will derate to prevent damage. Higher ambient temperatures and loads will increase the frequency of DDEC applying this derate logic. If the derate is occurring only occasionally, this is Typical . If the derate occurs more than Typical for given operating conditions, continue investigation for possible defects.

    1. If considered Typical , clear Fault Codes and return the engine to service.
    2. If determined to be abnormal frequency, perform step 2 .
  2. Remove the water pump and inspect the pump impeller.
    1. If the impeller is damaged, replace the water pump.
    2. If the impeller is not damaged, reuse the water pump and replace the EGR cooler.

Flash Code 39

Perform the following steps for Flash Code 39 (SID 146/FMI 2, 7 or 12).?

  1. Perform the checks in the "Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Basic Checks" section.
  2. Perform Test A in the "Testing Procedures" section.
  3. Test drive the vehicle with DDDL and perform a snapshot. Analyze the snapshot.
  4. Inspect the VPOD air supply for leaks. If the VPOD air supply has leaks, repair the leak.
  5. Perform Test B in the "Testing Procedures" section.

Exhaust Fumes

Perform the following steps for Exhaust Fumes .?

  1. Visually inspect the exhaust system for leaks (e.g. exhaust manifold, S-pipe, and turbocharger).
    1. If exhaust leaks were detected, repair as necessary.
    2. If no exhaust leaks were detected, perform step 2 .
  2. Tighten all S-pipe clamps to the proper torque specification.
  3. Reprogram the ECM.

Slobbering

Perform the following steps for Slobbering .?

  1. Visually inspect the entire length of the breather tube for kinks.
    1. If the breather tube is damaged, repair as necessary.
    2. If the breather tube is not damaged, perform step 2 .
  2. Perform a DDC Extraction of DDEC Reports.

    Note: Review extraction for excessive idle time. Times of 35% and higher are considered excessive.

  3. Drain the engine lubrication oil pan.
  4. Refill the lubrication oil pan with 32 quarts of approved engine oil and visually inspect the oil dipstick marking.
    1. If the oil dipstick marking is incorrect, replace the dipstick with a proper dipstick.
    2. If the oil dipstick marking was correct, testing is complete.

Engine Vibration

Perform the following steps for Engine Vibration .?

  1. Using a 0.060 in. feeler gage, measure the clearance between the bottom of the steel engine mount and the rubber biscuit at the rear engine chassis mounts.
    1. If the engine mount clearance is less than 0.060 in., replace the mount.
    2. If the engine mount clearance is greater than 0.060 in., testing is complete.

Engine Backfire, Engine Misfire, Intermittent Exhaust Smoke

For engine backfire, engine misfire, and intermittent exhaust smoke reprogram the ECM.?

TESTING PROCEDURES

Note: If further repair, removal, and DDDL procedures are required when performing the testing procedures, please refer to the Series 60 Service Manual, (6SE483) or contact the EDS Support Line for DDDL specific questions.

Test A

Perform Test A as follows.?

  1. Remove the turbocharger to charge-air-cooler (CAC) pipe.
    warning

    PRESSURIZED CHARGE COOLER SYSTEM?

    To avoid eye or face injury from flying debris, wear a face shield or goggles.?

  2. Pressurize the CAC inlet to 30 psi using special tool TLZ00100 or equivalent.
  3. Monitor the boost psi using DDDL.
    1. If the pressure is below 27 psi, visually inspect the CAC, hoses, and the delivery tube for leaks.
    2. If the pressure is at 27 psi or higher, continue to step 4 .
  4. Activate EGR VPOD (PWM #2) to 90% using the DDDL.
  5. Monitor the boost psi pressure for pressure drops when the EGR valve opens.

    Note: The pressure should have dropped significantly to approximately 9 psi.

    1. If the air pressure dropped to 9 psi, no further testing is required and Test A has been completed.
    2. If the pressure only dropped slightly, perform step 6 through step 8 .
  6. Physically inspect the EGR valve for a mechanical failure. If the EGR valve is not functioning correctly, replace the EGR valve.
  7. Visually inspect the EGR cooler for restrictions. If the EGR cooler is restricted, replace the EGR cooler.
  8. Visually check the delivery pipe for restrictions. Clean the pipe as necessary to remove restrictions.

Test B

Perform Test B as follows.?

warning

PERSONAL INJURY?

Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.?

  • Always start and operate an engine in a well ventilated area.
  • If operating an engine in an enclosed area, vent the exhaust to the outside.
  • Do not modify or tamper with the exhaust system or emission control system.
  1. Run the engine on a dynamometer to get the engine hot. If a dynamometer is not available, run the engine until hot (>170° F [76° C] coolant temperature).
  2. Activate the VPOD outputs to 90% and then back it down to 7% using the DDDL. Visually inspect the VNT and EGR valve for proper rod travel (full travel to stops).
    1. If the VNT is not functioning properly, verify VNT vanes are moving freely. For detailed information, please visit the Detroit Diesel Technical Service Letter Web Page at http://192.135.85.10/cust/sletr/revised_2004.asp and browse for Technical Service Letter "04 TS-16".
    2. If the EGR valve is not functioning properly, replace the EGR valve.
    3. If both the VNT and EGR valve have proper movement the test is complete.

      Note: Repeat this step three times.

Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Basic Checks

Perform the following basic steps to check the exhaust gas recirculating system.?

For all EGR related concerns (may include exhaust smoke complaints), perform the following steps. If any corrections are made as a result of these checks, test the unit again before proceeding further:?

Basic checks for all Series 60 EGR engines require the following tools:?

  • 1,000 Ohm resistor (low watt)
  • DDR suite 8 or DDDL version 4.2 or higher
  • Volt Ohm Meter
  • Pressure gage 0-200 psi
  • Pressure gage 0-100 psi

Check Delta P Sensor and Barometric Sensor

Follow these steps to check the Delta P sensor and Barometric Sensor:?

  1. Remove the Delta P Sensor from the mounting plate.
    warning

    EYE INJURY?

    To avoid injury from flying debris when using compressed air, wear adequate eye protection (face shield or safety goggles) and do not exceed 276 kPa (40 psi) air pressure.?

  2. Blow down through the sensor tubes (by way of the holes in the mounting plate) using an airline.
  3. Gently shake the sensor to remove any moisture before reinstalling. Moisture in the sensor does not cause permanent damage.
  4. Turn ignition On. (key ON, engine OFF).
  5. Connect either a Detroit Diesel Diagnostic Link® (DDDL) or a Diagnostic Data Reader (DDR).
  6. Read the Delta P counts.
    1. If the recorded Delta P counts read 86-118, verify that the venturi tube hoses-to-Delta P Sensor, are correctly installed and are not damaged. Repair as necessary, verify repairs. Visually inspect the delivery pipe for damage and proper assembly. If no problem was found, perform a Check VPOD Output Pressure Test "10.4.3.2 VPOD Output Pressure Test" found in the next section.

      Note: Reversed and damaged hoses will have an adverse effect on engine performance resulting in black exhaust smoke and engine surging.

    2. If the Delta P counts are out of the 86-118 range, replace the sensor and go to the Verification section.
  7. Measure and record barometric sensor pressure and compare recorded value to the intake pressure sensor value.
    1. If the sensor readings differ more than 4.14 kPa (0.6 psi), replace the barometric sensor.
    2. If the sensor readings do not differ more than 4.14 kPa (0.6 psi), task is complete.

Check VPOD Output Pressure

Click to see this graphic in a separate window

Follow these steps to check the VPOD input and output pressure:?

Note: Listen for air leaks at the VPOD during the test.

warning

PERSONAL INJURY?

To avoid injury from the sudden release of a high-pressure hose connection, wear a face shield or goggles.?

  1. Disconnect the air hoses from the EGR and VNT (Variable Nozzle Turbine) actuators.
  2. Install pressure gauges (accurate to within 1.4 kPa [0.2 psi]) at the outlet of the EGR and VNT hoses. (Use two gauges, or test separately.)
  3. Using the DDDL/DDR, activate PWM #2 (EGR) and PWM #4 (VNT) duty cycles and monitor the output pressure from the VPOD.
  4. Test: activating 11% duty cycle: Pressure = 106-134 kPa (15.4-19.4 psi). Go to steps 5a and 5b .
  5. Test: activating 90% duty cycle: Pressure = 485 - 515 kPa (70-75 psi).
    1. If the VPOD readings are as listed, check for active codes. Refer to the "Check for Active Codes" section.
    2. If the results in this step cannot be attained, check VPOD input pressure. Refer to the "Check VPOD Input Pressure" section.

      Note: Both activations must operate their component with full travel of the linkage to hit the stops.

Check Variable Output Pressure Device Input Pressure

Testing steps are as follows.?

?

  1. Measure the VPOD input pressure to port 1; ensure it is between(NNN) NNN-NNNNkPa (90 - 120 psi).
    1. If the supply pressure is less than(NNN) NNN-NNNNkPa (90-120 psi), troubleshoot the vehicle air system until that result is obtained.
    2. If the supply pressure is greater than(NNN) NNN-NNNNkPa (90-120 psi), check the VPOD part number (P/N) and supply voltage. Refer to the "Check Variable Output Pressure Device Part Number and Supply Voltage" section.
  2. Perform a Check Variable Output Pressure Device Part Number and Supply Voltage .

Check Variable Output Pressure Device Part Number and Supply Voltage

The following checks should be performed for the VPOD part number and supply voltage:?

  1. Check the VPOD label to determine if it is +12V or +24V compatible.
  2. Unplug VPOD's mating connector. A 1,000 Ohm resistor is needed for the next step. Insert the resistor between cavity 1 and 3 for ease of checking with the volt ohm meter (VOM)
    1. Turn ignition switch ON.
    2. Measure voltage from pin 3 to pin 1.
    3. Plug in either DDDL or DDR and check ECM voltage.
  3. Is the VPOD P/N and voltage, and ECM voltage correct?
    1. If the VPOD P/N and voltage are correct, check VPOD wiring. Refer to the "Check VPOD Wiring" section.
    2. If the VPOD P/N and voltage are not correct, contact the DDC Customer Support Center at(NNN) NNN-NNNN

Check VPOD Wiring

The following checks should be performed for the VPOD wiring. ?

Note: VPOD power should have been verified under the part number check. If not, refer to the "Check Variable Output Pressure Device part number and Supply Voltage" section.

  1. Turn ignition switch ON.
  2. Unplug the VPOD mating connector.
  3. Insert a 1,000 ohm resistor between cavities #2 and #1 for the +12V version, or cavities #2 and #3 for the +24V version.
  4. Connect a VOM to the VPOD connector between pin #2 and pin #3 for the 12V VPOD or pin #2 and pin #1 for the 24V VPOD.
  5. Using DDDL or a DDR, activate the PWM #2 (EGR Valve) and PWM #4 (VNT), and ensure:
    1. Activating 11% duty cycle: VDC = 90% of the VPOD supply voltage ± 1 volt (e.g., voltage to VPOD = 13.8V * 0.9 = 12.42V; therefore 11.42V to 13.42V at PWM is acceptable).
    2. Activating 90% duty cycle: VDC = 10% of the VPOD supply voltage ± 1 volt. (e.g., voltage to VPOD = 13.8V * 0.1 = 1.38V, therefore 0.38V to 2.38V at PWM is acceptable.)
  6. Note any air leakage when PWMs are activated to 90% and correct the leaks as needed.
    1. If both of the PWM voltage measurements are correct, replace the VPOD that had the wrong pressure reading.
    2. If the PWM voltage measurements are incorrect, and the wiring checks are okay, try a test ECM programmed for EGR, or contact the DDC Customer Support Center at(NNN) NNN-NNNN

Check for Active Codes

Check for active codes as follows:?

  1. Turn ignition ON.
  2. Plug in DDDL or a DDR.
  3. Read active codes.
  4. Record or print codes. Ensure that PID, SID, and FMI are recorded. Refer to the proper code section of the DDEC III/IV Single ECM Troubleshooting Guide , (6SE497) to troubleshoot that code.

    Note: FMIs listed as 14 are diagnostic information codes and no troubleshooting is required. For example, an engine derates due to high TCO temperature; a 404/14 code will be stored. This would indicate that conditions warranted having the ECM derate the fueling to the engine. If the customer complaint was a power loss, it could be explained that loss of power was done by the ECM to protect other engine components.

  5. If the issue is not related to the EGR system components, or if assistance is needed, contact Detroit Diesel Customer Support Center at(NNN) NNN-NNNN

Verification

Follow these steps to test:?

  1. Reassemble connectors or components.
  2. Start and run the engine.
  3. Perform a road test if this is necessary to duplicate original complaint.
    1. If symptoms/codes are gone, repairs are complete.
    2. If any codes display, review this section again; contact Detroit Diesel Customer Support Center at(NNN) NNN-NNNN

 

Buddy, Technician
Category: Heavy Equipment
Satisfied Customers: 730
Experience: 20 years experience. Freightliner tech for last 14 years
Buddy and 6 other Heavy Equipment Specialists are ready to help you

JustAnswer in the News:

 
 
 
Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com.
JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance.
Web sites like justanswer.com/legal
...leave nothing to chance.
Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent.
Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer people’s questions.
I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous.
 
 
 

What Customers are Saying:

 
 
 
  • I would (and have) recommend your site to others I was quite satisfied with the quality of the information received, the professional with whom I interacted, and the quick response time. Thanks, and be sure that I'll be back whenever I need a question answered in a hurry. Stephanie P Elm City, NC
< Last | Next >
  • I would (and have) recommend your site to others I was quite satisfied with the quality of the information received, the professional with whom I interacted, and the quick response time. Thanks, and be sure that I'll be back whenever I need a question answered in a hurry. Stephanie P Elm City, NC
  • used your service this weekend with "Trecers" help. thank you ,thank you, thank you. replaced an A/C fan motor. Local Auto Zone had part. $15.00 "tracer" fee and $40.00 for parts, I saved several hundreds of dollers at a shop. i will recommend you and use you in the future. David L. Richmond, TX
  • 9 dollars, 2 hours of my time, and I drove away. Your diagnosis was right on the mark. Thank you so much. Phil Marysville, CA
  • Lurch. Thank you very much. I had real doubts about this website but your promptness of response, quick followup and to the point answer with picture was incredible. Charles Walnut Creek, CA
  • As a single woman, I really appreciate an excellent and affordable opinion.
    Thank you Geordie, I will not hesitate to contact justanswer in the future!
    Sue Charleston, WV
  • Another great insight to what may be the problem. I will have my mechanic take a look at it tomorrow. Thanks again, Frank...you do indeed know your stuff. Jim Castleberry, FL
  • Wonderful service, prompt, efficient, and accurate. Couldn't have asked for more. I cannot thank you enough for your help. Mary C. Freshfield, Liverpool, UK
 
 
 

Meet The Experts:

 
 
 
  • Chris (aka - Moose)

    Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    112
    16 years of experience
< Last | Next >
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/MU/muddyford/2012-6-13_1204_1.64x64.png Chris (aka - Moose)'s Avatar

    Chris (aka - Moose)

    Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    112
    16 years of experience
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/Boxerman1969/2009-06-22_213107_ja_avatar.JPG Tim's Avatar

    Tim

    Foreman

    Satisfied Customers:

    338
    23 Years Heavy Equipment and Truck Repairs Shop and Field in the Minning and Construction Industry
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/jrwhitey2000/2009-01-03_193237_me.jpg J.R.'s Avatar

    J.R.

    Technician

    Satisfied Customers:

    148
    13 years as warranty technician for Detroit Diesel
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/yellowman99/2010-03-20_033822_Marshall_Pete_Furr.jpg Cat Man's Avatar

    Cat Man

    Caterpillar Engine Expert

    Satisfied Customers:

    3706
    23 Years Caterpillar Engine experience.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/WT/wtolkson/2012-6-8_12723_JApicture2012.64x64.jpg Wayne's Avatar

    Wayne

    Journeyman

    Satisfied Customers:

    3017
    34 years experiance as engine rebuild and problems.Thermo-King repair and trouble shooting.
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/cumminsdr/2010-7-20_204410_ja.jpg DR.Cummins's Avatar

    DR.Cummins

    FIELD SERVICE TECHNICIAN

    Satisfied Customers:

    2352
    16 Years working on Cummins Diesel engines,
  • http://ww2.justanswer.com/uploads/KO/koboma/2012-6-6_20917_DSCF1022.64x64.JPG Curtis B.'s Avatar

    Curtis B.

    service manager

    Satisfied Customers:

    2226
    30 years exp. with diesel engines, heavy equipment and forklifts, including lp forklifts