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Nurse Susan
Nurse Susan, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 1086
Experience:  RN, BSN, MSN-ED, Nurse Educator whose passion is helping people understand their health and wellness
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I was diagnosed with Aortic stenosis. I dont want surgery.

Customer Question

I was diagnosed with Aortic stenosis. I dont want surgery. Ive been taking apple cidar vinegar, hawthorne berry pills in tea, and changed my diet drastically to veges and do exercise and chant. Can yo utell me what more I can do to try to clear my aortic valve?
sean
Submitted: 2 years ago.
Category: Health
Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hello Jacustomer,

I would like to try to help you, but I need some more information...do you know what caused your aortic valve stenosis? How long have you had it? Does it cause you any difficulties or symptoms? How severe is it?

Thanks for clarifying,
Sincerely
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

Hi Nurse Susan

Im sean. Are you a homeopathic? do you know about natural cures?

 

Mine situation is a bit complicated. The doctors first said I had Bradycardia as I had a low heartbeat in hospital. I had a pacemaker . Now I seem ok, but now doctor says he thinks I also got aortic stenosis.

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean,
I'm not a homeopath and don't know all that much about natural cures...this was in the general health section; if you are looking for a homeopathic specialist I'm more than happy to try to reclass the question.
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

I understand your a medical nurse. I have talked to the cardiac doctor already & I know his opinion. But Im interested in other ways . Its very touchy with me. I was looking for alternative ways and have studied it alot. I am interested in more from a nurse, but id also like to ask a homoepathic later. Is that ok?

 

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hello Jacustomer,

That is fine with me. However, my approach is more from the allopathic philosophy of things. There may be some differences, I like teaching people about health and wellness conditions...that includes illness by the way. Getting people to understand whats going on inside them is what I like, and if that interests you, I'm happy to try to help. But it will be the western allopathic approach and understanding to this issue.

If you are still interested, I am here.
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

i read about allopathic philosophy just now. As opposed to homeopathic, "allo" greek for different, and "homeo" greek for similar. I wish I had a quick course how the body works. seems to be many systems, such as bone, endrocrine, muscular, nervous, immune, cardia vascular, skeleton, systems working together.

I had bradycardia, which doctors thought was caused by problems in my sa/av node blocking impulses. Maybe it was that I painted apts for 35 years and breathed the paint fumes or dust?

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

are you an expert on cardiac?

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
No, that I am not. I know about the heart, and can guide you through its workings, but an expert on it I am not.
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

my doctor says he did echo cardiogram , but i cant see how that can prove i got aortic stenosis for sure since the images are so blurry. i was reading on the reliability of echo cardio gram from many sonographic readers of the same images and got different opinions whether it was sever aortic stenosis or just mild. First my doctor said I only had mild or moderate, then later on my medical records, it read worse, so i dont know if its true

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

can i write tommorrow to you

i have to go?

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean,

Thank you so much for that additional information.
How the echocardiogram works is to send sound waves into your chest, and those waves are turned to a picture of what your heart is doing as blood travels through it. It may look incomprehensible to a layman or even to me, but someone trained in how to read them should be able to see if there is indeed stenosis...or narrowing..of a valve within the heart.

I find what you write very interesting. If I read your intent correctly, you mean that some studies have shown that different sonographic readers will give a different view of the same echocardiogram? I did not know that there was a subjective element to interpretation of these; objective definitions of what constitutes severe, mild, and moderate stenosis does exist and they have to do with how much blood is not getting to where it should.

So what is happening in your heart? I don't know your background here; forgive me if I go over information you already know. You did write you wished information on the workings of the body...so here we go with the heart. The heart is a four chambered organ whose job it is to pump blood throughout your body; on the right side of the heart unoxygenated blood comes in through the top atria, gets sent to the right ventricle, then the lungs where it gets oxygen, goes back to the heart and gets pumped out again to the body on the left side via the left atria and ventricle. Separating the atria and the ventricles are the two valves of the heart called the tricuspid and the mitral valves, and the aortic valve separates the aorta from the left atrium. .

Normally, these valves open and close securely and completely and it is these sounds of the mitral and tricuspid valves opening and closing which make the familiar lub dub sound we call the heart beat. However, sometimes, these valves don't close all the way, or cant open all the way, and that is what happens in aortic stenosis. Stenosis means a narrowing, aortic means its the aortic valve which is afflicted. This can happen for several reasons; viruses can cause this (like rheumatic fever), plaque within the valve can block it. I've never seen that paint fumes can cause this. So, if the valve can not open completely, blood from one chamber (or vessel as the case is here) can mix with the other, and actually be regurgitated back through the leaky valve. Additionally, this can lessen the flow of blood from the heart as the valve that releases the blood can not open fully. That is why many people with this problem have heart murmurs...the whoosh of the blood thats being regurgitated back is whats causing that sound. Heart murmurs can be from any of the valves that are not working correctly; where the sound is heard can help pinpoint which valve is the problem one.

If its severe, aortic stenosis can damage the left side of the heart. If the blood can not leave the heart as it should because the aortic valve wont open fully, the left side of the heart can actually become enlarged. This condition is called cardiomyopathy.

Unfounately, from what all I know, there is no food to eat if the damage was caused by a virus which will restore the valve. If your damaged valve was caused by high cholesterol, a healthy diet will help to not make the problem worse, but again, it wont reverse damage that is already there. There is nothing that I am aware of from a holistic or homeopathic arena that will help this. I understand you do not want surgery.

If you don't trust your doctors, and it seems that you don't, as you are getting different stories, there is nothing at all wrong with a second opinion. It is your body, and you have the right to a provider who is caring and treats you with respect. Its possible that a second provider may not believe you need surgery.

Here is some more information about aortic stenosis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001230/

And here is some of the objective measures that are used to assess its severity: http://www.echopedia.org/wiki/Classification_of_valve_stenosis_and_regurgitation
No, I do not understand the complex technical terms referred to on this site, but your cardiologist should, and he should explain it to you if you ask.

I hope I was able to help,
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

To susan

thanks for the information. I looked at alot of the echocardiogram images and I still cant see how they can prove stenosis for sure, no matter who reads them. They seem a guess at best.They are too unclear and seem only an opinion of the images. I mean, they cant actually see the valve with their own eyes or a photo to prove it. Sound waves just are not vision, though Id think they can see some distorted images, like ultra sound does with a baby in the womb, can tell some things like, the baby has 2 arms, 2 eyes, 2 legs, but not a clear vision of a small valve deep in the heart. Its too vital to guess at such an extreme operation, and later how can I tell if it ever was stenosis, as the valve would be torn apart and destroyed in the operation. Im not saying echo sounds dont work, I just cant see how they prove a bad valve for absolutely sure. I do know they operation of such is extremely expensive for the insurance companies

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean,
I am heading off to bed, but tomorrow I can write a in depth answer regarding echocardiograms.
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

Hi Susan

ok thanks for all the info about the heart, it was very helpful

thanks

sean

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean,

I understand what you mean...the images to an untrained eye do look blurred. But, someone trained in them can make head or tails from what they see on the screen.

The echocardiogram is interesting because it actually can give you a picture of what is happening inside the heart. As an MRI can take pictures of "slices" or "segments" through the body by sending waves of magnetic radiation, the echocardiogram does a similar thing with waves of sound.

The body absorbs many kinds of waves, but reflects those of sound, and the reflection of the wave will be different in different sort of tissue...thin, thick, liquid like blood, hard like cartilage...and the pattern of the wave that is produced will show those differences. The resulting pattern thats created by the varying reflections of the sound waves can show the path of blood within the heart, and can show how much damage an aortic valve may have and how much back flow or regurgitation there may be. There are several types of echocardiograms, and each gives a somewhat different view and specializes in detecting and specifying somewhat different pathology. There is also a doppler echocardiogram which measures the change in the waves frequency ( an approaching siren will sound different than a siren that is moving away) to detect blood flow speed and velocity.

These are objective measures and readings. But, not all readers of echocardiograms are equal...some may have more skill, some may have less skill. I read your nervousness here...a second opinion on this is never a bad thing, in fact, on a major issue like potential cardiac surgery, its a good idea to get a different view.

Also in any decision to have surgery is how YOU feel...what symptoms are you having from your aortic stenosis? As I mentioned above, severe or even moderate aortic stenosis unchecked can damage the left side of the heart, causing it to become enlarged, and that can negatively affect the hearts ability to pump blood...a condition called congestive heart failure (or more simply heart failure). That can be extremely uncomfortable and lead to leg swelling, edema, fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, wheezing, irregular heartbeats.

I know Ive given you allot to think about...I do suggest a second opinion.
Here is some reading on echocardiograms and how they work: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2215/

Here is information on Congestive Heart Failure:http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/heart-failure/DS00061

I hope I was able to help you, and thank you so much for your question.
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

thanks susan

can you answer some harder questions

1. Im reading alot about aortic stenosis. If the patient does not have a heart murmur, they figure its probably not aortic stenosis. Can you elabearte on the heart murmur as an extreme factor in predicting aortic stenosis?

2. I went to doctors 6 months prior and she never found any heart murmur, nor did any before doctor ever before here one. 6 mths later I went to hospital for slow heart beat, and again, the experts found no heart murmur, no rub.

But I was told by the doctors I had Bradycardia,(slow heart beat at times) as my heart was not pacing right at times, going low BPM, then back to normal, but my blood pressure was all normal this whole time, just my pulse BPM heart rate was slow at times.

I left the hospital as the slow heart rate turned to normal after few hours, but then 3 days later the slow heart rate returned & I went back to hospital. Now , a totally differnt staff of doctors , mainly there cardiac surgeon, he/they heard a murmur, maybe?. (note -i later thought this sound was actually a click sound in my sternum front bone which because I hit it during this time, made a click sound when i breathed at times, which I now think is what they thought was the murmur. I dont think i have a murmur, but the cardiac surgeon is the ony one who does. Since a murmur seems to be one of the main factors in deciding severe aortic stenosis (as well as the echo cardiogram as you explained very well to me-thank you for researching that), I figure, its logical, I may not actaully have severe aortic stenosis, but maybe just mild or moderate or maybe its something else, like just the Bradycardia ,like the first doctors first said is all it was and they never siad it could be anything else. They siad it was electrical, thats bradycardia, which is having to do with elctrical impulses of the heart and the natural pace system SA/AV node . They said it was not mechanical, meaning not to do with aortic valves or the heart but that my heart mechanically, nothing was wrong with it. So yes, i got 2 different versions.

The 1st set of doctors say its Bradycardia, slow heart beat only, and the cause is age, or maybe toxins in the environment (i worked around paint for 35 years as a painter part time) . They never mentioned anything about aortic stenosis, which is mechanical, not electrical. So they advised only a pacemaker, which they put in me ( which i very dislike and extremely reluctantly went along). Everything was fine. I went home next day.

Problem now is , the cardiac surgeon who put the pace maker in , later told me he saw by echodardiogram, i had bicuspid valve with calcium deposits on it. And will probably later need to change the aortic valve ( which I further extremely dislike). But my records say , it only appears bicuspid, and 4 mths later the surgeon tells me we only think it may be bicuspid, (as in not sure). And bicuspid is rare, and i dont really think i can beleive that totally by blurry echocardio sound waves. It seems a guess only. The question unfolds from the echocardiogram they did as i asked you about

 

My big question ive been trying to explain to you is, why does one team of doctors say I only have Bradycardia and the pacemaker is all I need and now the cardiac surgeon is saying, i need more surgery for the aortic valve

 

sorry for the detail, but as you can see its very impt

sean

Customer: replied 2 years ago.

please take all the time you need to get the most precise answer

id reather it took time than to be unclear

even if it takes a week or so is ok

thanks

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean....

I can see why you are confused. Its helpful to know that your aortic valve is bicuspid, that sheds some light on the situation. Most people have a tricuspid aortic valve. That means there are three flap things that open and close. You, however, have a slight defect in your aortic valve in that two of those flaps have fused together. You were likely born with this. That creates the bicuspid valve; that also creates a valve which is a bit stiff and is a bit inflexible compared to the conventional tricuspid valve. Because the bicuspid valve has this stiffness, "gunk" essentially can get stuck on it...like calcium deposits, or plaque, or even blood clots. This is a very long slow process, and it can take a long time for these to develop. That may be one reason why six months ago you had no murmur and now you have a very slight one. Absolutely, aortic stenosis has a murmur. You may have "gunk" starting to accumulate on your bicuspid valve. And yes, generally, the more "stuck" the valve is, the greater difficulty it has with not fully opening or closing, the louder the murmur that will be heard.

Murmurs can be VERY hard to hear when they are faint and barely noticeable; they are graded in severity from Grade 1-6. Grade 1 is barely audible; a practitioner who is not used to hearing murmurs all the time or even all that often may not realize that whats being heard is a murmur. Some of the loudest murmurs (Grade 6) can be heard even without a stethoscope. This is because a larger volume of blood back flowing or regurgitating will create more noise and turbulence than a smaller volume. In fact, with the worst Grade 6 murmurs, the turbulence of the blood flow can actually be felt if a hand is laid against the chest wall.

Murmurs wont cause a click when you breathe; you may have irritated your ribs to have done that. There ARE clicks that are caused by improper valve functions, but they don't relate to aortic stenosis; people who abuse cocaine, for instance, can have that odd clicking extra heart sound.

Bradycardia is a different issue than aortic stenosis, you have that perfectly right. Bradycardia is an electrical disturbance and I am impressed you knew about the SA/AV node. Its also not wholly out of the question exposure to chemicals can cause this; some medications can change and damage the electrical conduction system within the heart. On its own though, bradycardia doesn't have to result in low blood pressure. Blood pressure is the force with which the heart beats; a heart that beats too slowly can still beat with sufficient force (or even too much).

The two though (Bradycardia and aortic stenosis) may interrelate; if your heart is beating slowly, blood doesn't move as quickly as it would if the heart were beating rapidly. Therefore, blood can essentially remain within the heart for a bit longer than normal, and more "gunk" can settle and get stuck on those inflexible bicuspid aortic valves of yours.

A few possibilities raise themselves. You could be developing progressing aortic stenosis. It is a slow process, and many people don't really show symptoms until they are in their 70s. You are young at 53. That could also explain why you didn't have a murmur prior and now you seem to, if even a very mild one, the lowest grade. It is possible to have more than one thing going on with your heart, and the bradycardia may make it easier for "gunk" to settle in the aortic valves.

I am presuming though the pacemaker is pacing adequately and you no longer have bradycardia that you are aware of; the damage however, is already done from what was there. And no, having or creating a faster heartbeat wont "clean" the gunk off the valves; it adheres pretty well. (Be thankful for that...dislodged plaques and gunk which
decide to travel the body and get stuck in a smaller vein usually end up destroying the real estate of the areas they land in; pulmonary embolisms result in the lungs, strokes result in the brain, and deep vein thrombosis occurs in the legs when plaques and gunk tour the body and get stuck)

The skeptic's answer to the above is that the cardiac surgeon who found and diagnosed the aortic stenosis will get paid for doing the surgery; that impetus may prompt some finds that are not so clearly there. Of course, I'm not saying thats so, and I don't believe it, it is just in the realm of possible, though not likely probable.

My suggestion remains the same. Second opinion. Go to another cardiologist with your records, all of them. See if that person hears a murmur, even a slight one; see if that person looks at your echo cardiogram and can see clearly a bicuspid valve and some probable calcium deposits. Mild aortic stenosis can, it seems be monitored, but when it progresses to severe, it does need interventions lest it cause more damage (enlarged heart and CHF as discussed above).

There is more than one type of echo cardiogram, the link I gave you above on aortic stenosis had a few of the different tests used to diagnose it. Its not unreasonable to ask for some other tests, as long as they are not too terribly invasive. MRIs are not terribly invasive. Neither is the TEE echo cardiogram though it may be uncomfortable.

I get the strong sense you do not wholly trust this cardiac surgeon; you should have complete trust and faith in and for the man who will quite literally be holding your heart in his hands. I truly believe a second opinion would help you a great deal; it would either confirm what this surgeon says, or it would show that he was not correct and you were wise to trust your intuition. Most insurance companies that I am aware of will also pay for a second consulting opinion.

Here is a link I normally give to my nursing students, but I think you would find it of interest. Its a site that allows people to hear the various heart sounds and explains what they mean. I hope you find it educational: (Systole means when the heart is beating/ contracting; diastole refers to when the heart is at rest; the site is set to the page for aortic stenosis, which is a systolic murmur, which means its heard while the heart is actively beating. Yes, VERY complex to hear) If you listen to the "late aortic stenosis" its more clear that the familiar lub dub is a bit, well, blurry.
http://www.wilkes.med.ucla.edu/Systolic.htm

I hope that helped, and eased your mind...
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

thanks susan

 

can you e mail me sometime

i could use more help

shanjoseph123 @ aol.com

sean

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hello Sean...
You are very welcome, and I enjoyed working with you.
I however do not get paid for my time until and unless you press the green Accept button; that is if you believe this answer was helpful and satisfactory to you.

Its against JA Policy to email you off of this site, but if you wish to work with me again, I would enjoy that; just place my name in the title so I know your question is for me.

I hope I helped,
Sincerely,
Susan
Nurse Susan, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 1086
Experience: RN, BSN, MSN-ED, Nurse Educator whose passion is helping people understand their health and wellness
Nurse Susan and 2 other Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

thanks susan

i paid the accept answer fee. i appreciate your time and efforts

 

I wanted to expand on the diagnosis of my valve being , bicuspid

 

I read my medical records and they state, aortic valve "appears" bicuspid. That seems to imply, they only think it may be bicuspid, but are not saying it is absolutely sure.

Also, 4 months later i went to appt with my same cardiac surgeon and , asked him what about my situation, and he mentioned we think the valve is " bicuspid". I asked him further, you only think that? But you dont know for sure. He said, from the echocardiogram is pretty sure. I said that dont seem clear to me. He said , yes , its like x ray or ultra sound. But it seems to me they/he are not absolutely sure.

My question is- isnt it very well possible that their conclusion of it being Bicuspid, could be wrong. Isnt it possible, since it only appears that way, and they only think it is, that it may be that it is not? Since they cant see it with their own eyes ??? I think that it very well may not be bicuspid since only 1 in 100 are as i read. Also, of the 1% only very few become actual stenosis. I am an athlete, runner, though i have eaten some bad foods in my life with cholestrol, i was never obese, only 10-20 lbs over at most my good weight. Why should i be the 1 in 100 and of that 1, be the one that got , as you mentioned "gunk " on it??? I dont eat that much bad food in my life. Unless your saying it was from the environment, since I paint alot of apts in my life and breathed lots of oil base paints and dust too. Could it be the paint and dust got in my heart electrical parts, SA /AV node and bundle wiring? I took pills that said it removes toxins from the body too for a month or so that i got online

 

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean,

Thank you kindly for the Accept, it is much appreciated. Each time you press the Accept button you will be charged, so please ONLY do so IF you believe that I should be paid for successive answers.

I hear your lament. "Why me?". No one knows why some peoples aortic valves don't form properly. Its the same question anyone with any genetic disorder or even a disability asks themselves. Why me. Life just doesn't seem fair in many cases, and you are right, it is not. In your case, its not anything we can correlate yet, like we can with a lack of folic acid in pregnancy and resultant risk of neural tube defects. Its nothing you did, its nothing you did not do...it simply was an accident of genetics. What you ate was not relevant, especially since you write that you ate a pretty healthy diet. and especially since it may not be plaque that is the "gunk" which is blocking the aortic valve.

I did not write that the pain fumes caused any aortic valve abnormalities. I wrote that I would not be surprised if they contributed to a bradycardia. They are chemicals, and chemicals have been found to affect the hearts electrical system. Writing as you do about the hearts conduction system, I get the impression you think its somewhat wired like a fusebox or a cars engine where dust and particles CAN get in the wiring and screw it up. Thats not the case in the heart; the "wiring system" is composed of nerves and neurons and the electricity goes from and is conducted from nerve to nerve, stimulating the muscles of the heart in the order they must beat. There are no discreet "wires"; and dust particles have no way of getting to your heart directly unless you have an open chest wound; they'd have to be inhaled, so end up in lungs where any chemicals there could find their way to the blood, or ingested and digested, and thus their chemicals could travel to the heart that way. Chemicals like some types of medications and drugs can change the hearts conduction system because they change the way that electricity is conducted...they may lengthen the time it takes and so a ventricle may not contract as quickly as it should, for instance.

As for your doctors, absolutely they could be wrong. Doctors are human, and thus even they are prone to human errors and mistaken judgments and misguided interpretations of test results. But though they can not directly see the aortic valve doesn't mean they ARE wrong...recall that the echo cardiogram does allow the valve to be assessed even if rather indirectly. The echo cardiogram is taking pictures of slices of the heart...the valves function can be determined. Could they be wrong here? Yes. And you are terrified they are. Thus, I really truly strongly suggest a second opinion. Your own doctors should have no problems at all with the idea of you having a second opinion.

Lastly, the "pills and stuff that you got online" is ineffective and harmless at best, XXXXX XXXXX holistic substances have not been tested by the FDA for safety or efficacy, and they can contain herbs whose safety is not really totally known. I am not opposed to herbs, just use with extreme caution. I myself stick with chamoille tea and echinacea when I am not feeling well. Vinegar is certainly harmless, and my own herbal reference book mentions the cardiovascular effects of hawthorne (lowering blood pressure and is use in treating arteriosclerosis) but I can find no evidence that this actually has worked in human studies. Anyhow, some herbs can interact badly with some medications, and so generally, its a good idea to tell your doctor about any herbal or alternative therapies you are using.

I hope I was able to help,
Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

susan as I was saying before. I was a painter for 35 years. but only part time , only few days a month actually. I didnt think paint fumes or dust would hurt if inhaled, unless it was over along time. Are you saying that maybe, the 35 years of painting homes and apts, where I inhaled paint fumes from oil base paint & sometimes even dust, could eventually have reached my heart, since it goes into the blood and oxygen, and could have gotten in my sa/av node natural pacemakers of the heart, and wiring of the heart that allows for electrical impulses, causing the bradycardia I had. I actually had heartblock, very low pulse, and went to ER last dec, as i had faint spells that came and went.So they made me put in a pacemaker (which I very dislike).

But what Im trying to figure out is, if its just Bradycardia, and the pacemaker is enough. Or is it also aortic stenosis as the different group said, the cardiac doctor mainly. I dont see how it can be both. It seems strange, like it should be one or ther other. Why would I have both , causing dizzy and light headedness. The faints are now gone for almost 5 months with the pacemaker. But sometimes I still feel dizzy, lightheaded ness, but that can be cause also, i have bad insomnia bouts at times. I had real bad sleeps for 2 weeks just when I got a faint spells, and went to ER last christmas. Sleeping only 2 hours on some nights and 3-4 on other nights, I get very exhausted when I dont sleep, which also causes, lightheadedness, and even dizzy at times somewhat (i figure anyone who sleeps 1-2 hours for 6 or 7 days a night may feel faints at times anyways-simply extreme exhaustion)

Also, is it possible the "gunk could be from inhaling paint and dust. Yet they say specifically its calcium deposits. I know i did eat a fair over share of ice cream and lots of milk alll the time in cereal my whole life. Is this where the calcium deposits come from? Or could it be its just looks like calcium,but may be indirectly somehow, paint &/or dust that is the gunk? Cause how can they really see calcium deposits anyways with just a echo cardiogram (again its hard to picture that clearly for me with sound waves)

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hi Sean.

I did not write that the pain fumes DID cause a bradycardia. I wrote that I can conceive that its possible that they could, as after all, medications can affect the way the heart beats and alter the electrical pathway...the chemicals from paint fumes may be able to as well. But I'm not a chemist, not an expert in that area at all. Thats supposition on my part.

I can not judge or assess if the pacemaker you have is "enough". No one can from merely an online website. You need a second opinion as you have all these doubts, fears, anxieties. And while aortic stenosis can cause symptoms like chest pain, breathlessness, dizziness, so can anxiety. Anxiety could indeed be making your symptoms worse.

There is no way that there is paint or dust on the valves of your heart unless you had an open chest wound. Calcium and plaque deposits form from the blood which carries these chemicals to the cells which use them.

The echo cardiogram can really be suggestive of calcium or other materials due to the way the sound reflects off them and the picture formed by the sound waves.

Hope that helped,
Sincerely,
Susan
Nurse Susan, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 1086
Experience: RN, BSN, MSN-ED, Nurse Educator whose passion is helping people understand their health and wellness
Nurse Susan and 2 other Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

hi susan

thanks . I understand what you saying about the paint fumes and dust maybe could cause the Bradycardia. So I will try to get another opinion, but dont most cardiologist do the same tests?

But, I still do have the symptons of lightheadedness, kinda discordination at times too, kinda off balance at times. It seems more in morning and afternoon, then goes away by begginning of evening mostly, but not totally always, is kiinda different on different days (and if I did not sleep well ,yes, it seems a bit worse). I dont get the faints anymore for almost 5 months now.

 

I forgot to mention, I also did have one other sympton. Ive had this blurry eye spot seems in one eye mostly that I got months ago. This blur was BEFORE any faints started or light-headedness, or off balanceness at times. But mostly, and most lf the time, im ok and dont feel much of these symptons Just maybe in mornings and some in afternoon.Tends to all go away after 4-5 pm and i feel good all evening.

But, i have to mention a new sympton, just recently. It was the day after I went to get my pacemaker checked for battery and if working right . The pacemaker tech with her laptop adjusted it alittle is all. and she said all is just fine. BUt a day or so later , I felt this weakness in my legs and sometimes arms, or like a fatigue in my legs and arms. Tiredness. WHat do you think is causing the triedness. COuld it be the pacemaker is set wrong? Could it be aortic stenosis sympton? Or could it be something from the blur in my eye (which eye doc said was not in my eye itself-but caused by something else)??

I am going to see my primary care doctor next monday, to tell her all these symptons. She has not seen me for a long while, so she does not know of these symptons yet as she was not involved when i went to hospital. So. I must tell her

about the lightheadedness, off balance at times, bad sleeps on some nights, the blur in my right eye (but that the blur was checked by eye doctors twice and nothing was found in my eye-so it has to be something besides actually in my eye), and now this new sympton--weakness in legs and sometimes arms. I dont know whether to call it weakness or fatigue? Whats the difference? But I feel ok in morning cept bit lightheaded sometimes, then feel the weakness in legs and arms in afternoon. The weakness/fatigue goes totally away after 4-5 pm and I feel good all evening and night and most of morning. Could this be caused by aortic stenosis, bradycardia, the pacemaker, or the blur in my eye???? My primary doctor will probably order tests, and yes I want a second opinion of the aortic stenosis , or third even, because i would not want to do a operation like that and later find I still have the same symptons, and find the symptons where something else.

thanks susan for your help

 

 

I also forgot to mention, I had a blurry spot in my eye I noticed last year. I went to the eye doctor and they looked into my eye and found nothing there that was wrong with the eye. So they said it may be something else thats causing the blurry spot in your eye. Maybe a stroke or something.

thanks for your help

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hello Sean,

Since this is a new question about a different topic, I am going to have to ask you to open a new question for it. Two, in fact, as there are two issues here, the one with your eye, and the new issue of fatigue. If you want me to answer the fatigue question, please adress it to me in the title, if you wish someone elses view, thats fine as well, of course. There is an Eye category which may be able to help you on the eye issue better than I...so that I do reccomend.

Im happy you have a doctors appointment, hopefully she or he can ease your worries.

Sincerely,
Susan
Customer: replied 2 years ago.

hi susan

ok i understand . Thanks for you help on this question. I will submit other question to you with different title.

thanks sean

Expert:  Nurse Susan replied 2 years ago.
Hello Sean,

Thank you very much.
Sincerely,
Susan

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