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Susan Ivy
Susan Ivy, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 4058
Experience:  BSN, MSN, CNS
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Rapid Heart Rate long after red wine

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Occasionally when I've had red wine in the evening, I'll awaken around 1-2 am with a rapid heart beat. It doesn't always happen - probably 33%-50% of the time. My doctor hasn't been able to explain it. She said if I was having a "reaction" to the wine, my rapid heart beat should happen soon after drinking - not 7 hours later. Then when it awakens me, I'll drink a big glass of water, and change positions in bed - it can last up to 2 hours before I fall back to sleep. It usually helps when i sit nearly upright in bed -- Any ideas? thank you
Dear customer,
Welcome to Just answer.Reactions or adverse effects to pure wine are rare.Most commercially prepared wine will contain sulphite as a preservative.This can induce wheezing and tachycardia as a allergic side effect or reaction.A sensitivity to yeasts may also cause adverse effects on consumption of red wine.
Red wine is rich in histamine,it also causes release of histamine.The breakdown of alcohol involves the enzyme Aldehyde Dehydrogenase(ALDH).This enzyme is also involved in metabolism of the histamine.In individuals with a impaired gene(due to polymorphism) which affects ALDH enzyme which is also impaired.This causes a excess of histamine following alcohol intake,causing allergic symptoms due to alcohol intolerance.This may present as palpitations,flushing,headache ,abdominal discomfort,a feeling of heat due to elevated aldehyde levels in the blood.
Customer: replied 6 years ago.
Relist: Incomplete answer.
He explained allergic reactions to sulfites in wine but didn't answer any of my concerns. And I waited 11 hours for this answer? Not up to your standards I don't believe.

Alcohol interferes with sleep. Although many people are under the misconception that is will help sleep, and it may initially help one to briefly dose off, it interferes with the restorativeness and sleep is lighter. Often one must wake up to go to the restroom as well.

 

IF you eat when you drink the wine, this could also cause a delay in a reaction to sulfites. You could try an organic wine to see if this is the cause of your reaction, delayed or not.

 

Please reply if you have questions or comments so that we can assist you until you are satisfied with your answer.

 

 

Susan Ivy, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 4058
Experience: BSN, MSN, CNS
Susan Ivy and other Health Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 6 years ago.

If it is a reaction to the sulfites, wouldn't I have it every time I drink wine? Like I mentioned, it is inconsistent with anything I've reasonably tried to point it to.

 

Could it be menopausal, and not related to the wine? And if it is a reaction, why would changing positions help?

 

Sorry for so many questions, but my private doctor hasn't had many suggestions either.

It could be related to menopause, especially if it is happening at times other than when you drink.

 

As far as it happening every time you drink wine, it would depend on the wine. Some are preserved with sulfites and some are not. Again food in the stomach might change the reaction or decrease it as well.

 

I didn't understand that you said it stops when you change positions, I thought you said you changed positions but the heart rate could last up to two hours.

 

I think indeed that it cannot be assumed that it is related to the wine. I think it is important to find out what your heart rate is when this is occurring. Has your doctor considered a cardiac monitor? Do you have any symptoms such as pain or shortness of breath when this occurs? Even if you don't have symptoms, it seems that a cardiac evaluation would be an important thing to have completed.

 

I do agree that at 49 you are close to the average age of menopause (which is 50) so it could be related, but tachycardia, no matter what the cause needs further evaluation.

 

 

Susan Ivy, Nurse (RN)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 4058
Experience: BSN, MSN, CNS
Susan Ivy and other Health Specialists are ready to help you