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Ask Dr. Arun Phophalia Your Own Question
Dr. Arun Phophalia
Dr. Arun Phophalia, Doctor (MD)
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 33897
Experience:  MBBS, MS (General Surgery), Fellowship in Sports Medicine
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I get severe stomach cramp pain with noisy belching ...

Resolved Question:

I get severe stomach cramp pain with noisy belching frequently followed by vomiting or diarhea This usually lasts two days. I have tried to link it to certain foods but no obvious connection
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Health
Expert:  Dr. Arun Phophalia replied 8 years ago.

Greetings.

Since when is this happening? Are any investigations done? Can you pin point an area of maximal cramping? How old are you? Are you on any medications? Any previous significant illness?

Dr. Arun

Customer: replied 8 years ago.
This has happened on and off for about five years now happening about every two weeks. No investigations done just given pain killers and anti vomiting pills. Area around navel worst. I am 70. Fifteen years ago had cancer of uterus, hysterectomy followed by radiotherapy I am on candesartan (high blood pressure ) and diclofenac for osteo arthritis
Expert:  Dr. Arun Phophalia replied 8 years ago.

Hello,

Just the frequency of these episodes (every two weeks) demand investigations like ultrasonography and may be CT scan of the abdomen to get the diagnosis. I would consider the following;

1) diverticulitis,

2) chronic intestinal obstruction; with a previous abdominal surgery, adhesions are very common

3) recurrent appendicitis

4) gall stones.

You should contact your primary care physician for these investigations, so a diagnosis can be established and further management is instituted.

Please feel free for your follow up questions.

Dr. Arun

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