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Macy RN
Macy RN, RN CHPN
Category: Health
Satisfied Customers: 805
Experience:  RN of 19 years.Experienced in ER, Critical Care, Surgery, Nutrition, Peds,OB/Gyn and Hospice.
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Can Vaginal Prolapse cause severe pain in the legs, back ...

Can Vaginal Prolapse cause severe... Show More
Can Vaginal Prolapse cause severe pain in the legs, back and vaginal area? What are the repercussions of vaginal prolapse - can it tear and cause bleeding, for instance? I have no problem with urinating or defecating - just problems sitting, wearing tight fitting clothing and PAIN. What causes the pain?
Submitted: 8 years ago.
Category: Health
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replied 8 years ago.

HiCustomer


A vaginal prolapse is a condition in which structures such as the uterus, rectum, bladder, urethra, small bowel, or the vagina itself may begin to prolapse, or fall, out of their normal positions.

Without medical treatment or surgery, these structures may eventually prolapse farther and farther into the vagina or even through the vaginal opening if their supports weaken enough.

The symptoms that result from vaginal prolapse commonly affect sexual functions and bodily functions such as urination and defecation.

Pelvic pressure and discomfort are also common symptoms.

The following are types of vaginal prolapse:

  • Retrocele (prolapse of the rectum) - This type of vaginal prolapse involves a prolapse of the back wall of the vagina (rectovaginal fascia). When this wall weakens, the rectal wall pushes against the vaginal wall, creating a bulge. This bulge may become especially noticeable during bowel movements.

  • Cystocele (prolapse of the bladder, bladder drop) - This can occur when the front wall of the vagina (pubocervical fascia) prolapses. As a result, the bladder may prolapse into the vagina. When this condition occurs, the urethra usually prolapses as well. A urethral prolapse is also called a urethrocele. When both the bladder and urethra prolapse, this condition is known as a cystourethrocele. Urinary stress incontince (urine leakage during coughing, sneezing, exercise, etc) is a common symptom of this condition.

  • Enterocele (herniated small bowel) - The weakening of the upper vaginal supports can cause this type of vaginal prolapse. An enterocele results when the front and back walls of the vagina separate, allowing the intestines to push against the vaginal skin.

  • Prolapsed uterus (womb) - This involves a weakening of a group of ligaments called the uterosacral ligaments at the top of the vagina. This causes the uterus to fall, which commonly causes both the front and back walls of the vagina to weaken as well. The following are stages of uterine prolapse:

    • First-degree prolapse: The uterus droops into the upper portion of the vagina.

    • Second-degree prolapse: The uterus falls into the lower part of the vagina.

    • Third-degree prolapse: The cervix, which is located at the bottom of the uterus, sags to the vaginal opening and may protrude outside the body. This condition is also called procidentia, or complete prolapse.

    • Fourth-degree prolapse: The entire uterus protrudes entirely outside the vagina. This condition is also called procidentia, or complete prolapse.
  • Vaginal vault prolapse - This type of prolapse may occur following a hysterectomy, which involves the removal of the uterus. Because the uterus provides support for the top of the vagina, this condition is common after a hysterectomy, with upwards of 10% of women developing a vaginal vault prolapse after undergoing a hysterectomy. In vaginal vault prolapse, the top of the vagina gradually falls toward the vaginal opening. This may cause the walls of the vagina to weaken as well. Eventually, the top of the vagina may protrude out of the body through the vaginal opening, effectively turning the vagina inside out. A vaginal vault prolapse often accompanies an enterocele.

If this continues to hurt you surgery might be needed.

It might be possible that a different hormone could help more.

If you haven't seen you doctor for a while let him/her re-evaluate you to see if there is further prolapse.

Let me know if you have more questions.

I am here to help.

Best Wishes,

Macy

Customer reply replied 8 years ago.
This answer did not address my concerns regarding my pain and possible complications.
Macy RN, RN CHPN replied 8 years ago.

Hi again Pinklady,

As I mentioned previously:

Without medical treatment or surgery, these structures may eventually prolapse farther and farther into the vagina or even through the vaginal opening if their supports weaken enough.

You are going to have pain if the prolapse worsens because it is putting pressure on all the organs that it is pressing on.

If it is a uterine prolapse your uterus can literally prolapse out of yoru vagina.

As it presses on organs and nerves you can have leg pain.

I do urge you to see your doctor again if your pain has worsened.

Take Care,

macy