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MPMoore
MPMoore, GM WORLD CLASS/ASE MASTER W/L1 GMC
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2006 GMC Yukon Denali: tow..behind a mortorhome in neutral

Resolved Question:

Is it possible to tow a 2006 GMC Yukon Denali behind a mortorhome in neutral?
Submitted: 7 years ago.
Category: GM
Expert:  MPMoore replied 7 years ago.

This info came from GM. This information is for a non-denali, and is for 2wd and 4wd trucks, not all-wheel drive like most denali's are. last section below is for the awd trucks and states that it can not be towed in this fashion with causing damage. to tow like this, you will have to remove thedriveshafts.

 

Recreational Vehicle Towing

Recreational vehicle towing means towing your vehicle behind another vehicle - such as behind a motorhome. The two most common types of recreational vehicle towing are known as dinghy towing, towing your vehicle with all four wheels on the ground, and dolly towing, towing your vehicle with two wheels on the ground and two wheels up on a device known as a "dolly".

With the proper preparation and equipment, many vehicles can be towed in these ways. See "Dinghy Towing" and "Dolly Towing", following.

Here are some important things to consider before you do recreational vehicle towing:

What's the towing capacity of the towing vehicle? Be sure you read the tow vehicle manufacturer's recommendations.
How far will you tow? Some vehicles have restrictions on how far and how long they can tow.
Do you have the proper towing equipment? See your dealer or trailering professional for additional advice and equipment recommendations.
Is your vehicle ready to be towed? Just as you would prepare your vehicle for a long trip, you'll want to make sure your vehicle is prepared to be towed. See Before Leaving on a Long Trip.

Dinghy Towing

Two-Wheel-Drive Vehicles

 

Notice: If a two-wheel-drive vehicle is towed with all four wheels on the ground, the transmission could be damaged. The repairs would not be covered by the vehicle warranty. Do not tow a two-wheel-drive vehicle with all four wheels on the ground.

Two-wheel-drive vehicles should not be towed with all four wheels on the ground. Two-wheel-drive transmissions have no provisions for internal lubrication while being towed.

Four-Wheel-Drive Vehicles (NP8)

 

Use the following procedure to tow your vehicle:

  1. Shift the transmission to PARK (P).
  2. Turn the engine off, but leave the ignition on.
  3. Firmly set the parking brake.
  4. Securely attach the vehicle being towed to the tow vehicle.

    Caution: Shifting a four-wheel-drive vehicle's transfer case into N (Neutral) can cause the vehicle to roll even if the transmission is in P (Park). The driver or others could be injured. Make sure the parking brake is firmly set before the transfer case is shifted to N (Neutral).

  5. Shift the transfer case to NEUTRAL (N). See Four-Wheel Drive for the proper procedure to select the NEUTRAL (N) position for your vehicle.
  6. Release the parking brake only after the vehicle being towed is firmly attached to the towing vehicle.
  7. Turn the ignition off.

Dolly Towing

 

Two-Wheel-Drive Vehicles

 

Notice: If a two-wheel-drive vehicle is towed with the rear wheels on the ground, the transmission could be damaged. The repairs would not be covered by the vehicle warranty. Never tow the vehicle with the rear wheels on the ground

 

 

 

Two-wheel-drive vehicles should not be towed with the rear wheels on the ground. Two-wheel-drive transmissions have no provisions for internal lubrication while being towed.

Two-wheel-drive vehicles can be towed on a dolly with the front wheels on the ground provided that the wheels are straight and the steering column has been locked.

Four-Wheel-Drive Vehicles

 

If your vehicle is equipped with StabiliTrak, it is not designed to be dolly towed. If you need to tow your vehicle, see "Dinghy Towing" earlier in this section.


Object Number:(NNN) NNN-NNNN Size: B4

If your vehicle is not equipped with StabiliTrak, use the following procedure to tow your vehicle:

  1. Drive the vehicle up onto the tow dolly.
  2. Shift the transmission to PARK (P).
  3. Turn the engine off, but leave the ignition on.
  4. Firmly set the parking brake.
  5. Securely attach the vehicle being towed to the tow dolly.

    Caution: Shifting a four-wheel-drive vehicle's transfer case into N (Neutral) can cause the vehicle to roll even if the transmission is in P (Park). The driver or others could be injured. Make sure the parking brake is firmly set before the transfer case is shifted to N (Neutral).

  6. Shift the transfer case to NEUTRAL. See Four-Wheel Drive for the proper procedure to select the NEUTRAL position for your vehicle.
  7. Release the parking brake only after the vehicle being towed is firmly attached to the towing vehicle.
  8. Turn the ignition off and lock the steering column.

 

 

Recreational Vehicle Towing

Recreational vehicle towing means towing the vehicle behind another vehicle - such as behind a motorhome. The two most common types of recreational vehicle towing are known as dinghy towing and dolly towing. Dinghy towing is towing the vehicle with all four wheels on the ground. Dolly towing is towing the vehicle with two wheels on the ground and two wheels up on a device known as a dolly.

Dinghy Towing and Dolly Towing

 

All-Wheel Drive Vehicles


Object Number:(NNN) NNN-NNNN Size: B3

 

 


Object Number:(NNN) NNN-NNNN Size: B3

 

Notice: Towing an all-wheel-drive vehicle with all four wheels on the ground, or even with only two of its wheels on the ground, will damage drivetrain components. Do not tow an all-wheel-drive vehicle with any of its wheels on the ground.

The vehicle is not designed to be towed with any of the wheels on the ground. If the vehicle must be towed, see "Towing the Vehicle" previously

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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