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Cher
Cher, Educator-40+ yrs
Category: General
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Experience:  M.A., B.A., Author, Information & Research Specialist
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This is more a grammar question than etiquette, but they do

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This is more a grammar question than etiquette, but they do go hand in hand (it is bad etiquette to have bad grammar). My wife uses the word "well" when I think she means "good". She often says, "I do not like it as well" to compare two things as in, "I like the blue one one more. I don't like the green one as well". She doesn't use it as a synonym of "in addition to". We are looking for clarification on this point. Maybe I should post this in relationship advice instead!
Hello, and welcome back to Just Answer!

My name is XXXXX XXXXX it will be my pleasure to be of assistance to you.

Using 'well', when comparing two items, and placing 'as' before and after 'well', it is appropriate in the comparative sense. Example: I don't like the green one as well as the blue one; I like the blue one more (or better). Better yet, using 'much' is also appropriate: 'I don't like the green one as much as the blue one.'

The grammar in your example does sound rather 'stilted' and in this sentence, 'much' would be a better word than 'as well.' As you mentioned, 'as well,' is usually used as a synonym for 'in addition to,' so saying, "I like the blue one one more. I don't like the green one as well," the implication is almost contradictory, because 'as well as the blue one' is implied in this second sentence and would be basically understood, but its meaning would come across as: "I don't like the green one either."

I hope this clarified the issue for you! Laughing

Best regards,
Cher
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