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SpecialistMichael, MS, CSCS
Category: General
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Experience:  Senior Information Specialist
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I need help with saying "she smiled" or "he smiled at t

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I need help with saying "she smiled" or "he smiled at them" in my fiction novel. I seem to be using smiled or grinned or beamed over and over again. Please give me several examples of how I can word this differently. I've said "she flashed a smile" and I've used that too much. I am using this in between dialogue primarily to describe real-time events, I've looked up all the synonyms but I just need different ways of saying "she smiled nervously" "she flashed a worried smile" etc. Thank you
Hi There~

My name is XXXXX XXXXX I am here to help with your question.

How does this sound to you:

“She beamed, but with an uneasy tremble on her lips”.

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My name is Mike:

How about using the words "grin" or "smirk" which both can be used couple with emotion as in "she quickly shot a nervous grin toward them as she walked by" or something to that effect?

For the delivery of the smile you can use things like:

She gave...

shooting over a short, fear-filled grin

smiling carelessly she....

Then there are times you may not even need to use the word for a smile or grin. You can simply describe the situation and allow the reader to envision the expression.

"Casually walking, careless and lightly as the sun beaming down on her skin, the corners of her lips rising with each thought of her.... .... or whatever the case is in your storyline.

Hopefully this helps, keep in mind you don't always need to use the direct words to get people to envision what is going on. It just takes a minute for those "wheels" to spin up and get us thinking a different way about description.

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SpecialistMichael, MS, CSCS
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 508
Experience: Senior Information Specialist
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