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Michael Hannigan
Michael Hannigan, Internet Researcher
Category: General
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Experience:  Extensive experience in research and problem solving.
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lionel trains i have a lionel standed gauge no 33 blk ,what

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lionel trains
i have a lionel standed gauge no 33 blk ,what its worth ?
ed , works not bad shape ed

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

Hello. I can assist you with your question.

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

In 1906, Lionel ntroduced a new line of model trains that ran on track with a width (between rails) of 2.125 inches. In order to power the electric locomotives, the track included a third rail in the middle, which conveyed electricity.

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

After coming up with a slogan that proclaimed “Lionel—Standard of the World,” Lionel named the design “Standard Gauge” and filed a trademark. Lionel derived the name from an incorrect interpretation of a gauge defined by the German toy company Märklin. Whereas Lionel measured width between rails, Märklin measured the width from the center of one rail to the center of the other.

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

In fact, this “standard” gauge was decidedly non-standard—European manufacturers had settled on two inches, as had Carlisle & Finch, the company that invented the toy train. ...The No. 1 gauge was much smaller, at 1.75 inches. But “standard” stuck and, more importantly, implied the sizes of other brands were, in fact, the strange ones.

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

But the term "stuck" and it has always been known as the "standard gauge" train.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

The #33 Locomotive was produced in the early 1900s.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

The Standard Gauge #33 Black Locomotive in working condition is worth between $150-$180 at auction.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

If properly restored, it can fetch up to around $360.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

If you have any questions, please let me know.


 

Customer:

what do you mean properly restore .repainted,

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

No. Definitely not just painted.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

Professionally restored.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

I wouldn't recommend painting over the original.


 

Customer:

i figure it too be worth more ed old book value 450

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

The market varies wildly, and with the economy, many collectable values are down.


 

Customer:

thanks ed

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

The way I calculate the value is based on recent prices realized at auction.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

It's certainly not a science... and when you say "not in bad shape", I'm assuming that it's in average condition.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

The condition affects price a great deal, so if it's in better condition, it can be worth quite a bit more.


 

XXXXX XXXXXnigan :

Please remember to rate my level of service before leaving.


 

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