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SpecialistMichael
SpecialistMichael, MS, CSCS
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Experience:  Senior Information Specialist
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In 2000 northwestern football team had a hail mary pass where

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In 2000 northwestern football team had a hail mary pass where the receiver tapped the pass to another northwestrn player for the touchdown. Was it a practiced play or just luck?
Do you remember what team they were playing?
Customer: replied 4 years ago.


They were playing Minnesota university

Customer: replied 4 years ago.

Universiy of Minnesota

Customer: replied 4 years ago.
,

Universiy of Minnesota

Hi Jim name is XXXXX XXXXX apologies on the slight technical difficulty and delay. I have worked with Division 1 college football and have thousands of hours in a D1 sport setting with various other teams and sports.

Let me know if this is clear and helpful.



Often times, football teams practice control of the field by practicing the "atypical" things that happen during pass or running plays. They intentionally do this so the team and its players maintain control both of themselves as well as the ball(and game) if something were to go a little wrong.

You will also see defensive skill players doing ball tips and other recovery drills in the event they are able to disrupt a pass play or something similar.

It is very common to see football teams practice "tipping" drills where they basically pass the ball if unable to catch or if they were to catch out of play.

The answer to this question is YES - this is a technique that is practiced and WAS in fact practiced by this team. Obviously when hail mary passes are thrown, there are a lot of bodies in a small area, getting 2 hands of the intended player to control the ball with all the other things going on is a lower percentage than at least a little bit of contact with it. The idea is if the pass is thrown and incomplete, then its an incomplete pass. If the ball is tipped from what would have been the "incomplete" person to another chance at a catch then obviously this is another chance to score. We have all seen the hail mary plays where 8 people jump in the endzone, just to disrupt a pass and usually that is what happens.

I did some further research to get to the exact bottom so we could figure out what happened in this particular game - so read on:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/college/news/2000/10/28/nwestern_minn_ap/ if you reference the article here: you will see the interview following the game and near the bottom the play is called "victory right" where the players practice tipping the ball to another player in the event of a poor pass or poor player placement. The article is quoted as saying ("We practice that every week," Kustok said. "Not just like that, but pretty close." )

So the answer to your question is yes, while it may or may not have been the intended play, it is a practiced play to maintain maximum control in any circumstance. That is what happened.

SpecialistMichael and 26 other General Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.



I just received an answer from you and it disapeared please resend Jim segerson




Here you go Jim

Hi Jim name is Mike, my apologies on the slight technical difficulty and delay. I have worked with Division 1 college football and have thousands of hours in a D1 sport setting with various other teams and sports.

Let me know if this is clear and helpful.



Often times, football teams practice control of the field by practicing the "atypical" things that happen during pass or running plays. They intentionally do this so the team and its players maintain control both of themselves as well as the ball(and game) if something were to go a little wrong.

You will also see defensive skill players doing ball tips and other recovery drills in the event they are able to disrupt a pass play or something similar.

It is very common to see football teams practice "tipping" drills where they basically pass the ball if unable to catch or if they were to catch out of play.

The answer to this question is YES - this is a technique that is practiced and WAS in fact practiced by this team. Obviously when hail mary passes are thrown, there are a lot of bodies in a small area, getting 2 hands of the intended player to control the ball with all the other things going on is a lower percentage than at least a little bit of contact with it. The idea is if the pass is thrown and incomplete, then its an incomplete pass. If the ball is tipped from what would have been the "incomplete" person to another chance at a catch then obviously this is another chance to score. We have all seen the hail mary plays where 8 people jump in the endzone, just to disrupt a pass and usually that is what happens.

I did some further research to get to the exact bottom so we could figure out what happened in this particular game - so read on:
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/football/college/news/2000/10/28/nwestern_minn_ap/ if you reference the article here: you will see the interview following the game and near the bottom the play is called "victory right" where the players practice tipping the ball to another player in the event of a poor pass or poor player placement. The article is quoted as saying ("We practice that every week," Kustok said. "Not just like that, but pretty close." )

So the answer to your question is yes, while it may or may not have been the intended play, it is a practiced play to maintain maximum control in any circumstance. That is what happened.