How JustAnswer Works:
  • Ask an Expert
    Experts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm.
  • Get a Professional Answer
    Via email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site.
    Ask follow up questions if you need to.
  • 100% Satisfaction Guarantee
    Rate the answer you receive.
Ask JB Umphrey Your Own Question
JB Umphrey
JB Umphrey, Consultant
Category: General
Satisfied Customers: 20233
Experience:  Skilled at assisting with general information needs.
14211116
Type Your Question Here...
JB Umphrey is online now
A new question is answered every 9 seconds

Is it bad for my tree to be somewhat hollow / have rot inside? I

This answer was rated:

Is it bad for my tree to be somewhat hollow / have rot inside?
I have some type of oak tree (I think) in my front yard. It's leaves and acorns are beautiful and healthy looking every year. However, it has had some a fairly large wound on it since I bought the house in 2007. I recently bought some tree repair spray I thought might help heal the wound. Instructions on the can said chip away any loose / dead material before applying. But I was surprised by how much loose material there is. I kept chipping and chipping deeper and found out the tree seems almost hollow at the base around this wound. Is this OK? Can it heal?
Welcome and thank you for your question!

I am sorry to learn of your experience. The tree will not heal. For all functional purposes, the tree is already dead. In older trees the bark and living sapwood can be "breached" so the center becomes hollow. As long as most of the bark and cambium linking the roots with the leaves is intact the tree continues to live.

The original breach may have been from a branch lost in a storm. This lets insects attack the wood making tunnels then birds follow widening the tunnels to eat the insects. Eventually the tree has a hollow. This can never be reversed. The tree is now structurally weakened and it's only a matter of time before it will fall. I personally know of a woman who was cutting grass on her riding lawnmower on a beautiful day who was killed by large falling branch from such a tree. It's a condition you should not ignore.

It has been my pleasure to assist you today with your information needs. It is my goal that you are satisfied.

What are your options now?

If you wish to continue this conversation, click on the Reply tab.
If you are satisfied that I have answered your question, then please rate the answer with “excellent service” so that I receive credit for assisting you. Positive ratings are the only way I receive credit for assisting you today.

IF you feel the need to click either
"Helped a little" or "I expected more," then do not rate me (not yet, anyway!). Instead, reply to me using the REPLY tab. Specify what additional information you need and I will be happy to continue further and do everything I can to provide you with the service you seek.


Thanks,
~~ J.B.
JB Umphrey and 38 other General Specialists are ready to help you
Customer: replied 4 years ago.

I appreciate your insight. My tree is large & mature. Its wound is at the base and it's hollow from the the wound pretty much to the other side so it is somewhat concerning.


 


I stubled across a page talking about filling a hollow with concrete to help strengthen it. Do you have any experience with or thoughts on filling a hollow?


 


I can't help but think of the giant redwoods with roads paved through the center of the tree, too!


 


Attachments are only available to registered users.

Register Here

Attachments are only available to registered users.

Register Here

Attachments are only available to registered users.

Register Here
View Full Image

Attachments are only available to registered users.

Register Here

A guy down the road from me did that about seven years ago and his wife was madder than a hornet when the tree still had to come down and then she was stuck with that huge cement "sculpture" in her yard and the guy had no way to remove it. She hammered him something fierce because it's easier and cheaper to just have the stump ground out -- can't do that when there was all that cement put in.

I have not personally filled a trunk with cement because, again, that does nothing to strengthen the branches which are also weakening in this process.

~~ J.B.

Related General Questions