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Cher, Educator-40+ yrs
Category: General
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Experience:  M.A., B.A., Author, Information & Research Specialist
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what is the difference between seduce and induce

Resolved Question:

what is the difference between "seduce" and "induce"?
Submitted: 6 years ago.
Category: General
Expert:  Cher replied 6 years ago.
HelloCustomer and welcome back to JustAnswer!

From a summary of their dictionary meanings (Merriam Webster):

"Seduce" means to persuade to be disobedient or disloyal; to lead astray, usually with persuasion or false promises; to carry out the physical seduction of--entice into sexual acts; to attract or lure.

"Induce" means to move by persuasion or inflluence; to call forth or bring about by influence or stimulation; effect, cause--bring about; to cause the formation of; to produce (as an electric current) by induction; to determine by induction, specifically--to infer from particulars.

As you can see, the one thing both these verbs have in common is 'persuasion', however, to 'seduce' usually infers a persuasion with not so honorable intentions and/or with the intention to lead astray. It most often has a sexual implication, but not always. For example: "He attempted to seduce the investors with promises of huge future sales."

To 'induce' is used more in the sense of 'to bring about', or to cause, as in inducing 'labor' (in childbirth), or inducing vomiting, sometimes necessary in the event of ingestion of a toxic substance.

Please let me know if you need any further explanation. If you have seen or heard these words used in a particular context and need additional help, please let me know and I will explain further, based upon that.

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