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The Geezer
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at 7000 feetabove sea level,at what temperature (+/- 2 ...

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at 7000 feetabove sea level,at what temperature (+/- 2 degrees fahrenheit) will h2oboil?assume that tha barometric pressure is 30.00 inches hg.
Submitted: 9 years ago.
Category: General
Expert:  The Geezer replied 9 years ago.
The boiling point of water at 7000 feet above sea level, with normal barometric pressure at sea level being 30.00 in HG, will be 199.4 degrees F.

Source (including a chart): http://www.biggreenegg.com/boilingPoint.htm

The following link indicates the assumptions and computational methods used to determine the boiling point given:

http://www.biggreenegg.com/boilingPoint.htm#pressure

Wikipedia also explains the phenomenon:

"...The boiling point of a substance is the temperature at which it can change its state from a liquid to a gas throughout the bulk of the liquid at a given pressure. A pure liquid may change to a gas at temperatures below the boiling point through the process of evaporation. Any change of state from a liquid to a gas at boiling point is considered vaporization. However, evaporation is a surface phenomenon, in which only molecules located near the gas/liquid surface could evaporate. Boiling on the other hand is a bulk process, so at the boiling point molecules anywhere in the liquid may be vaporized, resulting in the formation of vapor bubbles...."

"...The boiling point corresponds to the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the substance equals the ambient pressure. Thus the boiling point is dependent on the pressure. Usually, boiling points are published with respect to standard pressure (101.325 kilopascals or 1 atm). At higher elevations, where the atmospheric pressure is much lower, the boiling point is also lower. The boiling point increases with increased ambient pressure up to the critical point, where the gas and liquid properties become identical. The boiling point cannot be increased beyond the critical point. Like wise, the boiling point decreases with decreasing ambient pressure until the triple point is reached. The boiling point cannot be reduced below the triple point...."

"...The boiling point corresponds to the temperature at which the vapor pressure of the substance equals the ambient pressure. Thus the boiling point is dependent on the pressure. Usually, boiling points are published with respect to standard pressure (101.325 kilopascals or 1 atm). At higher elevations, where the atmospheric pressure is much lower, the boiling point is also lower. The boiling point increases with increased ambient pressure up to the critical point, where the gas and liquid properties become identical. The boiling point cannot be increased beyond the critical point. Like wise, the boiling point decreases with decreasing ambient pressure until the triple point is reached. The boiling point cannot be reduced below the triple point.

If the Heat of Vaporization and the vapor pressure of a substance at a certain temperature is known, the normal boiling point (under standard pressure) can be calculated by..."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boiling_point
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Expert:  The Geezer replied 9 years ago.
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