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Chris (aka- Moose)
Chris (aka- Moose), Technician
Category: Ford
Satisfied Customers: 45647
Experience:  16 years experience
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97 ford t-bird 4.6 liter both horn and cruise control stop

Customer Question

97 ford t-bird 4.6 liter both horn and cruise control stop working what should i do
Submitted: 11 months ago.
Category: Ford
Expert:  Chris (aka- Moose) replied 11 months ago.

Welcome, I'm Chris (aka Moose). Experts aren't employees / agents of Just Answer. We are independent service providers using the Site to sell their Expert knowledge to Customers. I strive to provide EXCELLENT 5 STAR service, let me know what's needed from me so your pleased.

Normally this results in the issue being the clock sping between the steering column and steering wheel or the wiring under the horn pad faulty. Remove the horn relay under the hood. Pin 30 and 86 should have power. If you jump a wire from pin 30-87 the horns should blow. Check pin 85, ohm testing it to ground. When you press the horn this pin should have no resistance to ground, a 0.0 reading. If your not getting this signal then we need to remove the horn but leave it plugged in. One wire at the connector should be ground and when the horn is pressed the other wire also grounded. If you get that result, then its the clock spring. If you get half the result then its the horn switch. If you do not even get ground then OHM test the 2 wires from the cruise switch dark green/orange and light blue/black from the switches to the speed control amplifier. If there is an open circuit then the clock spring is the most likely culprit. The Horn gets its ground from the speed control amplifier.

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