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Ron
Ron, ASE Certified Technician
Category: Ford
Satisfied Customers: 23001
Experience:  23 years with Ford specializing in drivability and electrical and AC. Ford certs and ASE Certs
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Can the A4wd on a 2002 expedition be disabled. Is it as

Customer Question

Can the A4wd on a 2002 expedition be disabled. Is it as simple as just changing the switch to a four position switch with a 2h position on it?
Submitted: 1 year ago.
Category: Ford
Expert:  EricFromCT replied 1 year ago.

The AWD drive cannot be disabled. There is a different transfer case than the 4WD models.

Customer: replied 1 year ago.
there is nothing I can do except live with it or get ride of it. I love the vehicle but when it is slick out every time I take off from a stop it pops and bangs to the 4 wheel engages. Do these systems give a lot of trouble and do they need a lot of maintenance, or are they fairly trouble free. Does the front axle have power going to it all the time, even in A4wd or does it kick out completely on dry surfaces?
Expert:  EricFromCT replied 1 year ago.

In A4WD, the generic electronic module (GEM) varies the torque split between front and rear drivelines by controlling the transfer case clutch. Under most conditions, the GEM activates the transfer case clutch at a minimum duty cycle (percentage of time the clutch is turned on) which allows for a slight speed difference between the front and rear driveshafts which normally occurs when negotiating a corner on dry pavement. When the rear wheels are overpowered, the GEM detects this slip condition, and the duty cycle to the transfer case clutch is increased until the speed difference between driveshafts is reduced. In this manner, the GEM can redirect engine torque to the front wheels when the rear wheels lose traction yet still allow operation in the A4WD mode on dry pavement.

It is usually normal that a small bang will be felt when the front axle kicks in. It may do this more than it should or be even louder if your tires tires are not worn evenly or are different size. As much as 1/2 inch in tire circumference can cause a lot banging from the transfer case.

How do your tires look?